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equations, the conjunctions and eclipses of the heavenly bodies, their positions at any given time, and the various changes through which they pass for thousands of years. It points out apparent time, mean or real time, and ecclesiastical time.

10. On its face you see the motion of the stars, of the sun and planets, of the moon and her satellites. Two little cherubs, who sit, the one on one side, the other on the other, strike the quarters of the hour; Death strikes the hour with a mace, while four figures pass and repass before him, representing the various stages of human life.

11. At twelve o'clock every day, when Death strikes twelve — the apostles, who are represented each with the badge of his martyrdom, come out from the clock, and pass before an image of the Saviour, bowing as they pass, and receiving his benediction, which he gives with a movement of the head.

12. When the apostle Peter makes his appearance, a gilded cock, which is perched on one side of the clock, flaps his wings, raises his head, and crows so long and so loud as to make the whole cathedral ring again. This he repeated three times, in memorial of the cock that crowed three times before the fall of Peter, during the crucifixion of our Saviour. Of course the cock makes no further noise or motion till the next day at twelve o'clock, when he repeats the same loud and startling crow, flapping his wings and raising his head.

13. Now I dare say you will all exclaim, — What a wonderful clock ! and what a wonderful man he must be that made it! Yes, my young friends, but how much more wonderful the mechanism of the universe, and the God who made it! How wonderful that Being who made you and me, and all mankind, and keeps the whole universe going, and every heart beating, from day to day and from year to

Lo, these are but a part of his ways; but the thunder of his power who can understand !” 14. But suppose

some boy should say,- That's all

year!

nonsense, - nobody made the clock, - it made itself,-it came by chance, and has kept going ever since, without any help from without. Why, you would say that boy was crazy, would you not ? What, then, shall we think of those who tell us that there is no God? - that the earth, the sun, moon and stars, men and women, trees and flowers, birds and beasts, came by chance, and that they keep living and moving and growing without the help from without? It seems to me that we must think of these just what the Bible says, – “ The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God."

CHAPTER XXVI.

PSALM CXLVIII.

1. Praise ye the Lord ! let sounds of praise

From every mountain-top be poured ;
And from the heavens your voices raise

In songs of glory to the Lord.

2. Praise Him, ye angel throngs who stand

In radiant ranks around his throne;
Ye hosts, who wait at his command,

Make his eternal glory known.

3. Sun! burning in thy path of light,

And flinging thy rich gifts abroad;
Stars! watchers of the solemn night,
Praise

ye the everlasting God !

4. Called into being by His word,

Who still his watch around you keeps ;
Sing praises to the sovereign Lord,

Ye heavens of heavens — ye upper deeps !

5. Earth and her waters — fire and hail

Vapors obedient to His will
The fleecy snow, the stormy gale,

His word commissioned to fulfil

6. The mountains, tossing to the sky

Their snowy heads in proud disdain –
The hills, beneath whose shadows lie

The riches of the ripening grain —

7. Trees, laden with their luscious fruit.

Cedars, that rise like columns tall -
The creeping insect, and the brute

Obedient to his master's call.

8. The joyous bird, whose winnowing wings

Are freely to the breezes given,
That soars exultingly and sings,

As if its song were learned in heaven

9. Kings of the earth, whose sceptred hand

Is clothed with majesty and power -
Princes and judges of the land,

Before whose presence guilt doth cower

10. High-hearted youth, within whose breast

Heaves darkly passion's lava-tide —
Maidens, in virgin beauty dressed –

Old age, with childhood by his side

11. Reverent let all, with glad accord,

Blending their many tones in one,
Shout hallelujahs to the Lord,

Whose name is excellent alone!

12. Whose glory, above earth and heaven,

Untarnished, evermore shall dwell;
Praise Him, ye saints ! to God be given
The praises of His ISRAEL !
9*

CHAPTER XXVII.

A BAD HABIT.

“Oh! mother, I am tired to death !said Jane Mills, as she threw herself into a chair on her return from school.

Tired to death!” repeated her mother, slowly.
“ Yes, mother, I am - almost, I mean,” she added.
No, my daughter, not even almost," said Mrs. Mills.

Well, at any rate,” continued Jane, “I would not walk from here to school again, to-day, for anything in the world !

“Oh, yes, you would, my dear,” said her mother gently.

“ No, mother, I am sure I would not ; I am certain nothing would tempt me.

“But I am nearly certain you could be induced to go without any urging," answered her mother.

· Well, mother, try me, and see if anything could make me willing to go."

Suppose,” said Mrs. Mills, “I should offer to take you with me to the new panorama this afternoon ?-I expect to visit it."

“Do you, mother?” said Jane, with great animation. “May I go? You promised to take me when you went.”

“I intended to have done so," replied her mother; “but the place where it is exhibited is a very long way beyond

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your school.

“ But I am quite rested now, dear mother !” said Jane ; “I would not fail of going for all the world! Why do you smile, mother?

“ To think what an inconsistent little daughter I have.” “ What do you mean by inconsistent, mother ?

Why, when a little girl says one minute that she would not walk a particular distance for anything in the world,' and in the next minute says she would not fail' of walking still further for all the world,' she not only talks inconsist

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ently and extravagantly, but foolishly. It is a very bad habit to use such expressions. Yesterday, when you came home from school, you said you were almost frightened out of your life ; and when I inquired as to the cause of your alarm, you replied that you had met as many as a thousand cross dogs on your way home from school. Now, my daughter, I wish you to break yourself of this bad habit. When you are tired, or hungry, or frightened, use the simple words that express your meaning. For instance, you may be tired — very tired — or exceedingly tired; or you may be alarmed, or frightened, or terrified. From this time, let your lips speak the thing you mean. The Bible

says,
· Let
your yea

be
yea,
and

your nay nay;' and adds, that whatsoever is more than these cometh of evil.' Will you try to remember what I have been saying, and strive to correct this fault, my dear child ? ” said Mrs. Mills.

“Yes, dear mother," replied Jane; "for I know it is wrong, and I feel ashamed and sorry for it.”

Well, my dear," added her mother, IMPROVE! And now you may get ready to go with me to see the panorama.”

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CHAPTER XXVIII.

SONG OF THE SOIL.

1. I start the bulb of the beautiful flower,

And feed the bloom of the wild-wood bower ;
I rear the blade of the tender herb,
And the trunk of the stalwart oak I curb;
I force the sap of the mountain pine,
And curl the tendrils of the vine ;
I robe the forest, and clothe the plain
With the ripest of fruits and the richest of grain.

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