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he now owns upward of six hundred acres, upon which he has good farm buildings; he erected his two-story brick residence in 1860, and barn in 1870. Mr. Oliver was united in marriage with Clarissa Cutright Nov. 5, 1843 ; she was born in Ross Co., Ohio, May 19, 1821 ; seven chil. dren were the fruit of this union, viz., Henry, Sarah J. (deceased), Robert, Leroy P., Lewis D., John W., and one which died in infancy; they have also raised two orphans from infancy, one until 18 years of age, at which time she married ; the other is now 10 years, and is being educated as one of their own children. Mrs. Oliver was daughter of William Cutright, who was born in Ohio July 18, 1791, where he died Nov. 10, 1846. Mrs. Cutright was born Jan. 25, 1782, in Virginia ; she is now living with her daughter, Mrs. Oliver, and is in the 98th year of her age. Mr. Oliver has taken a deep interest in the cause of religion and education, having, with his wife, joined the C. P. Church in Le Roy in 1862, and has filled the office of School Director several years in the district where he lives. .

ROBERT OLIVER, farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Le Roy; one of the old settlers of McLean Co., born in Ross Co., Ohio, Aug. 16, 1849; at 5 years of age, ne emigrated with his parents to Illinois, and located upon Sec. 19, Empire Township; he is the second son of Jackson Oliver, whose biography appears among the sketches of this township in this work. The subject of this sketch attended the common schools until 19 years of age, and assisted his father upon the farm until 20 years of age, when he was united in marriage with Cornelia Watt March 17, 1870: she was born in Illinois Oct. 1, 1850; they have two children by this union-Pleasant Jackson, born Dec. 13, 1873 ; Milvin A., June 24, 1876. Upon the marriage of Mr. Oliver, he removed upon his present place, where he has since lived; he has good farm buildings, and owns upward of fortytwo acres and works eighty acres belonging to his father. Mrs. Oliver is a daughter of Pleasant Watt, who was born in Kentucky and died in McLean Co., Ili., March 26, 1876.

LE ROY W. PRAY, farmer and stock-raiser; P. 0. Le Roy; born in Franklin Co., Ohio, Feb 21, 1840; he emigrated to Illinois with his father, Daniel Pray, and located upon Sec. 25, Empire Township, McLean Co., in the fall of 1852, where he assisted his father in farming until 1861, when, after vain efforts to join a regiment from Illinois, the regiments having been made up, he went to St. Louis and enlisted as private in the 8th Mo. V. I., being mustered into service June 16, 1861; after being engaged in the interior of the State for a few months, they were stationed at Cape Girardeau two months, and from there to Paducah, Ky., where they remained until February, 1862, when they went up the Tennessee River to Ft. Henry, and from there to Ft. Donelson, on the Cumberland River, where, after severe fighting for two days, in which the 8th Missouri lost heavily, the fort was captured, with 15,000 prisoners, upon the 16th of February, 1862; he was next engaged in the battle of Shiloh, April 6, 1862, from which place, while on the march to Corinth, he was wounded at the skirmish of the Russell House, May 17, 1862, and was sent to the hospital at St. Louis, where he remained a short time and returned home on a furlough ; after returning again to the hospital he was refused a permit to join his regiment, but, watching his opportunity, he prepared himself, and, when the first detail was ready to march, he stole in their ranks and with them marched away ; by inquiry, he found his regiment lay at Memphis, where he succeeded in joining them, remaining here until December, 1862, when he was forwarded to Vicksburg, where, with his regiment, he was engaged upon the unsuccessful assault upon the above place on the 28th and 29th of December, 1862 ; he was then in the battle of Arkansas Post on Jan. 10 and 11, 1863, and, during a part of the winter, was engaged upon the canal opposite, which was within shelling distance of Vicksburg, and which rendered the labor dangerous and tedious; about the 17th of April, steps were taken for tbe reduction of Vicksburg, and from that date until the capture of the same, July 4, 1863, he was either on the march or in active service, being engaged in the battles of Jackson, Miss., on May 14; Champion Hills, May 16 ; seige and capture of Vicksburg; second battle of Jackson, July 14 to 18 ; he then returned to the rear of Vicksburg, remaining until fall, when they went to Chattanooga, Tenn., and engaged in the battle of Mission Ridge, which engagement was brought on by two companies of the 8th Missouri crossing the river, making their way in rear of the rebel pickets, when, capturing the same without alarming the rebel camp, they were sent to re-inforce the 9th Army Corps, but, before reaching Knoxville, the rebel army had withdrawn; during the winter following, he was stationed at Larkin's Ferry, guarding the pontoon bridges, and, in April, they started on the march to Atlanta, and were engaged in the battles of Rome Cross Roads, Lay's Ferry, Buzzard's Roost, Resaca and Kenesaw Mountain; arriving within a few miles of Atlanta, he was sent back to St. Louis ; mustered out of service, receiving his discharge July 7, 1864, having served in the Union army upward of three years; he then returned to Empire Township, where he has since followed farming, with the exception of two years, when he went to Nebraska and laid a soldier's claim. He married Sept. 14, 1864, to Mary, daughter of Hamilton Gilbert; she was born in this township July 15, 1844 ; she died June 14, 1876, leaving one child pow living-John H., born Jan. 23, 1866. His marri.ge with Emily, daughter of James Bishop, was celebrated Aug. 7, 1877; she was born in Empire Township Aug. 30, 1843.

WILLIAM PFITZENMEYER, farmer and brick manufacturer; P. O. Le Roy ; born in Wurtemburg, Germany. April 14, 1827. He attended school until 14 years of age, when he learned and worked at brick-making until he attained his majority, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York in May, 1848. Coming West, he worked two years at his trade in Pulaski, Logan Co.; then two years in Bloomington, McLean Co., and, in 1854, returned to Germany, where he was married, March 27, 1855, to Sophia Rutter; she was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, Jan. 18, 1827.

Upon the 3d of May, 1855, he, with his wife, sailed from Germany, and landed in New York the June following. Coming West, he located upon Sec. 28, Empire Township, McLean Co., where he has since lived. He now owns sixty acres of land, upon which he has good farm buildings, his two-story brick residence being erected in 1876. He cultivates about thirty acres of his farm, but has given his attention mostly to burning brick, of which he bas burned as high as six hundred thousand in a single season, Two children were the fruit of this union--Sophia Matilda, born April 9, 1857, died July 28, 1862; Hugo Ulrich Gustav, born July 9, 1868.

WILLIAM M. ROSS, farmer, Sec. 35; P. 0. Empire; born in Pickaway Co., Ohio, Feb. 8, 1848, where he attended school and followed farming until 19 years of age, when he emigrated to Ilinois, and located in Empire Township, McLean Co., in the spring of 1867. He then hired as farm-laborer, until he was united in marriage with Mary E. Ross, April 6, 1871; she was born in Pickaway Co., Ohio, Sept. 26, 1853 ; she was the daughter of Talmage Ross, who emigrated from Ohio, and located in McLean Co., in 1855. The children of William M. and Mary E. Ross were four in number, viz. : Lemuel Talmage, born Aug. 14, 1872; Harly Davie, Sept. 25, 1874; William A.. Oct. 16, 1876, and George, Sept. 11, 1878. In 1871-72, he farmed upon rented land, and in Sept., 1872, he purchased eighty acres on Sec. 35, upon which he located in the spring of 1873, and to which he has since added by purchase, until he now owns 118 acres, upon which he has good farm buildings, all of which he has made by his own hard labor.

JAMES RUTLEDGE, (decea-ed) farmer; one of the early pioneers of McLean Co.; born Feb. 22, 1808. He emigrated from Kentucky to Illinois, and located in McLean Co., about the year 1830, where he entered land, upon which he live l until his decease, which occurred Nov. 30, 1863. He was united in marriage with Prudy Vandeventer, in Logan Co., ill. ; she was born in Tenn., March 6, 1816; she came with her parents to Sangamon Co. in 1825; when 10 years of age, she came with John Buckles to this county, and was the first white woman that ever cooked a meal's viciuals at what is now known as Buckles' Grove, Empire Township. They were the parents of seven children now living Mrs. Rutledge is now 64 years of age, and is now keeping house in Le Roy, and has moved but once during the past forty-seven years. In a brief letter, written by her, to be presented to the meeting of old settlers, she makes mention of her first meal, cooked at Buckles' Grove, as being the first meal cooked by a white woman at that place, she then being but 10 years of age, and the date being 1826. She also draws a beautiful illustration of the contrast between that date and the present, showing the wonderful changes that have since occurred.

AMOS RUTLEDGE, farmer ; P. O. Le Roy. This gentleman is a native of McLean Co.; born in what is now Empire Township, Feb. 17, 1841. He is the son of James Rutledge, whose sketch appears among the biographies of Empire Township. The subject of this sketch was brought up on the form until he attained his majority, when he was united in marriage, upon the 25th of Nov., 1862, to Hannah Gilmore; she was born in Ohio, and located in Minois in 1856. He then commenced farming for himself, which he followed until 1867. He then engaged in the dry-goods and grocery trade in Le Roy one year, by which trans action he lost some $6,000, and, leaving him largely in debt, he then engaged as farm-laborer, and has since successfu ly followed farming, and has paid up his liabilities in full. He is now largely engaged in farming as well as purchasing gra n, upon a liberal salary, for the firm of J. 0. Peckham & Co., of Pruvidence, R. I., to which place he ships largely, having purchased upwards of 40,000 bushels during the last four months. The children of Amos and Hannab (Gilmore) Rutledge were six in number, of which five are now living, viz. : William, Etta. Almeda, Fred and Calla.

GEORGE M. SELLERS, farmer and stock-raiser; P. 0. Le Roy; born in Knox Co., Ohio, Sept. 8, 1837, where he followed farming until the fall of 1859, when he made a visit to Williamson Co., Texas ; after remaining during the winter, purchased a mule, upon which he started for home through the wilds of Texas and the Indian Territory. He arrivel at Smithion, Mo., upon the 18th of May, having made a trip of 800 miles alone, through a dangerous and perilous country. He then returned to Ohio, where he, with another party, purchased 1,500 head of sheep, and started to drive them overland to Texas; arriving in Edgar Co., he wintered his sheep, and, in the following spring of 1861, drove them to McLean Co., and herded the same for two years. In 1863 he sold a part of his sheep, and returned to Ohio, where he purchased 150 head of cattle, which he brought to this county and sold. In the spring of 1861 he purchased 136 acres of his present place, to which he has since added, until he now owns 230 acres, with good buildings, and is extensively engaged in farming and stock-raising. His marriage with Sarah C Bonnett was celebrated Oct. 8, 1863; she was born in Knox Co, Ohio, Oct. 21, 1835. They have two children by this union-Lizzie R., born Nov. 4, 1865, and Mary, born Sept. 19, 1871, died Sept. 20, 1873. Mrs. Sellers is a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Yonntz) Bonnett, whose biography appears in this work. The father of Mr. Sellers, John Sellers, lives upon the place upon which he located in 1824, and is upwards of 80 years of age.

He has held several offices, among which he was a member of the new Constitutional Convention in 1855. His wife died in Obio in

1838. After the marriage of George M. Sellers, he lived a short time in Le Roy ; then two years in Bloomington ; since which time he has lived upon his pleasant place, situated within view of, and at a distance of one mile from, Le Roy. In 1877 he was elected as Highway Commissioner for three years, which position he now holds.

CHARLES STERLING, farmer, Sec. 4, Town 21 ; P. 0. Le Roy; born in Fairfield Co., Ohio, Nov. 24, 1821 ; his father, Thomas Sterling, died when the subject of this sketch was 8 years of age, after which he assisted his mother until her second marriage, when he commenced labor for himself. His first wages were $4 per month, the receipts of which were used for the support of the family until he was 20 years of age; he was then employed by one man for a period of seven years in succession, when he commenced to farm for himself, in 1846, which business he followed in Ohio until the fall of 1854, when he emigrated to Illinois and located in Empire Township, McLean Co. The following spring, he, with his brother Samuel, rented land which they worked in partnership together, until he purchased 160 acres of land in Sec. 35, where he lived eight years, when, disposing of the above, he purchased his present place in 1864, where he has since lived. He now owns about 200 acres of land, upon which he has good farm buildings, which he has accumulated by his own hard labor, energy and economy, in which he has been nobly assisted by his amiable wife, to whom he was united in marriage Dec. 17, 1818; her maiden name was Anna Kesler ; she was born in Fairfield Co., Ohio, Jan. 7, 1827; they had seven children by this union-Thomas, born Feb. 21, 1851, now practicing law at Springfield, Ill. ; Isabella, Dec. 18, 1852, now teaching school at Decatur; Sarah E., Nov. 14, 1854, now Mrs. N. Vance, DeWitt Co.; John A., Feb. 1, 1857; Joseph, March 5, 1859; Eda Alice, Sept. 9, 1862, and one which died in infancy; of the above John A. and Joseph are now attending the Wesleyan University at Bloomington. Mr. Sterling has filled the office of School Director for several years, and is now School Trustee.

SAMUEL STERLING, farmer, Sec. 4, Town 21 ; P. 0. Le Roy; born in Pickaway Co., Ohio, Sept. 27, 1824 ; his father died when his family were quite young, after which he continued to live with his mother, working out what spare time he had uutil 18 years of age, when he engaged as farm laborer until he emigrated to Nlinois and located in Empire Township, McLean Co., in the fall of 1854; he then, with his brother, engaged in farming until 1859 ; then farmed alone for five years, after which he purchased forty acres, upon which he lived six years, when he disposed of the game and purchased eighty acres of his present place in 1871, where he has since continued to live. His marriage with Martha West was celebrated Sept. 18, 1860; she was born in Harrison Co., Ohio, Dec. 1, 1832; they have four children now living by this union, having lost five by death; the living are—John C., born Jan. 22, 1863 ; Elizabeth, March 27, 1866; Ada B., Sept. 15, 1876, and James E., April 17, 1878. Mrs. Sterling was the daughter of W. H. West, who emigrated from Harrison Co., Ohio, and located in Empire Township, McLean Co., in 1855; Mr. and Mrs. West both died in McLean Co. in the fall of 1862.

JOHN TIPTON, farmer, Sec. 29; P. 0. Le Roy; born in Pickaway Co., Ohio, Oct. 27, 1835, where he attended school until 11 years of age, when he emigrated to Illinois with his parents and located in McLean Co.; near where Towanda now stands; his father died some six months after his arrival, after which he remained with his mother and managed the farm until he attained his majority, when he rented land and engaged in farming for himself until 1870, when he purchased 120 acres of land upon Sec. 29, Empire Township, which he exchanged for his present place in 1878. His marriage with Nancy E. Rucker was celebrated July 4, 1871; she was born in Madison Co., Ky., and died in McLean Co., III., July 4, 1873, leaving no children. Mr. Tipton is a brother of Thomas F. Tipton, a prominent lawyer of Bloomington, more generally known as Judge Tipton, having held the office of Judge for eight years; his sister, Mrs. William S. Tuttle, now lives in Saybrook, McLean Co.

SILAS WATTERS, retired farmer and merchant, Le Roy; one of the early pioneers of McLean Co.; born in Stafford co., Va., Nov. 19, 1803. At 11 years of age, in 1814, be, with his parents and brothers and sisters, crossed the Alleghany Mountains in a two-wheeled cart drawn by one horse ; the parents have since passed away, but the children, of whom there were nine, all are living, the youngest being 65 and the oldest 79 years of age. In 1830, the subject of this sketch located in what is now Empire Township, McLean Co., where he has lived for & period of nearly half a century; he first entered 180 acres of land, to which he afterward added until he was in possession of 640 acres, a portion of which he still owns. He has always fol. lowed farming and stock-raising, and for a period of ten years was also engaged in the mercadtile business in Le Roy and neighboring towns. He has always taken a deep interest in the cause of religion and education, having been an active member of the M. E. Church since 1825, and filled every office in the Church which is given to a layman; he has had his full share of township and school offices, and held the office of Associate Judge of McLean Co. during the term of Judge McClum, in 1850–51. His marriage with Christiana Conaway was celebrated Feb. 12, 1824; she was born in Bourbon Co., Ky., June 9, 1799 ; she died Oct. 25, 1866, leaving four children, having lost two by death; the living are: Chalion D., born June 17, 1826; John T., born Aug. 22, 1827; America, born Nov, 9, 1828; Nancy, born Jan. 30, 1831. His marriage with Mary Jane (Baddeley) Barr was celebrated Dec. 21, 1868; she was born in Manchester, England, March 3, 1823 ; she emigrated with her parents in 1835.

CHALTON D. WATTERS was born in Bourbon Co., Ky., June 17, 1826 ; he settled with his parents upon his present place in 1830, and is the oldest contio uous resident upon any one place in Empire Township, having lived upon his present place for nearly half a century. He bas always followed farming, and has in his home farm 221 acres, situated one mile from Le Roy, upon which he has good farm buildings. His marriage with Sarah C. Moore was celebrated Dec. 29, 1852; she was born in Virginia, Sept. 20, 1829; eight children were the fruit of this union, of which six are now living-Silas, Miller C., John T., William, Christ Ann and Mattie May.

BRUCE WATT, farmer, Sec. 29; P. 0. Le Roy. The subject of this sketch was born in De Witt Co., II., June 19, 1855, where he attended the common school until ten years of age, when he located with his father upon Sec. 29, Empire Township, McLean Co., where he lived until the decease of his father, P. P. Watt, which occurred March 26, 1876. Mrs. Watt died in Logan Co., Ill., in October, 1853. The subject of this sketch lived in Le Roy one season after the death of his father, and in the winter of 1876 he purchased his present place, where he has since lived. His nuptials with Carrie Pence were celebrated April 26, 1877; she was born in McLean Co., Ili.. Sept. 25, 1857; they have one child by this union-Sibyl, born Oct. 31, 1878.

MATTHEW D. WEBB, farmer, Sec. 33: P. 0. Le Roy; born in Union Co., Ohio, Nov. 23, 1815, where he lived upon his father's farm until 17 years of age, when he enlisted March 17, 1863, in the 96th 0. V. I.; he remained in camp at Columbus. Ohio, until April 1, when he was sent to New Orleans, and was engaged in the Red River Expedition, where he was in many engagements, among which was the battle of Sabine Cross Roads and Pleasant Hill; he then remained at Morganzia Bend a short time, after which he was engaged in the capture of Ft. Gaines, Ft. Morgan, Ft. Blakely, and Spanish Fort, when the city of Mobile surrendered to the Union forces, where he remained a few months ; when he was forwarded to Galveston, Texas ; then to Brownsville, where he was mustered out of service and received his discharge, in the early part of the summer of 1866, at Columbus, Ohio, after serving in the Union army for a period of over three years ; in September, 1866, he came to Illinois, on horseback, and located at Le Roy, McLean Co., where he followed carpentering a short time, and in 1871, he located upon his present place, where he has since lived, and where he has a farm of eighty-five acres, two and one-half miles from Le Roy. His marriage with Nancy M. Rutledge, was celebrated Nov. 24, 1870 ; they have two children now living, by this union-Malinda M., born June 4, 1873, and Laura B., April 26, 1877. Mrs. Rutledge is the daughter of James and Prudy Rutledge, who were among the early settlers of McLean Co., and whose biography appears in this work.

GEORGE YONTZ WEST, farmer and stock-dealer; P. 0. Le Roy. The subject of this sketch was born in Knox Co., Ohio, Sept. 21, 1847 ; his father, John C West, was born in Knox Co., Ohio, and followed carpentering and farming until 1851, when he emigrated to Illinois, and located in Empire Township, McLean Co., and in 1869, he removed to Taylor Co., Iowa, where he now lives. He was married in Ohio, to Susan Bonnett; she was the daughter of John Bonnett, whose biography appears in this work; Mrs. West was born in Ohio, April 27, 1821; she died a few years after removing to Illinois, and lies buried in the Oak Grove Cemetery, one mile east of Le Roy ; at 20 years of age, George Y. West, made his home with James Bonnett, and commenced dealing in stock, his first purchase being ten hogs; he has since enlarged his business, buying, feeding and shipping cattle, horses and sheep to Chicago and the Eastern markets; he located upon his present place in April, 1878, where he has about 100 acres of land, which he purchased in 1874. His marriage with Hester I. Scott was celebrated March 21, 1878; she was born in Clinton Co., Ind., March 1, 1853 ; she is the daughter of William E. Scott, now living in Empire Township.

JAMES S. WILEY, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. Le Roy; a native of Empire Township, McLean Co., Ill.; born on the 5th day of Aug. 1839; his father, James Wiley, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, June 10, 1810; he emigrated from his native country to the West India Islands, in 1828, where he was employed as book-keeper and overseer of a large plantation upon the Island of Jamaica until 1835, when he emigrated to America, and to McLean Co., II., and until 1845, followed the mercantile trade at Le Roy and neighboring towns; he then engaged in farming, which business he followed until his decease, which occurred on the 5th of June, 1860; he now rests in the beautiful cemetery situated one mile east of Le Roy ; during his life he was largely identified with the interests of the township, was one of its most influential citizens and filled many offices, among which was Justice of the Peace for sixteen years, and was the first Supervisor of Empire Township, and held the office continuously until his decease. His widow now lives in Le Roy; she is a sister of our much respected and worthy citizen Silas Waters, and is one of a family of nine children, who, with their parents, crossed the Alleghany Mountains in 1814, in a two-wheel cart, drawn by one horse; the children are all now living; the youngest now 65 and the oldest 79. James S. Wiley lived with his father, attended school and followed farming until 17 years of age, since which time he has given his whole attention to farming ; he removed upon his present place, in February, 1869, where he owns 120 acres of land, under a high state of cultivation. His marriage with Kate Williams was celebrated Jan. 19, 1869; she was born in McLean Co., Sept. 10, 1843; they have two children-James B., born May 27, 1870, and Daisy A., Dec. 20, 1872 ; Mrs. Wiley was a daughter of Aaron S. Williams; he was born in White Co.,

Ill., and was one of the early settlers of this county. He married Nancy Conaway, who emigrated with her parents from Kentucky, and located in what is now Empire Township, McLean Co., in 18:30. Mr. and Mrs. Williams are now living in Normal.

THOMAS M. WHITAKER, farmer; P. O. Le Roy; one of the early settlers of McLean Co.; born in Mason Co., Ky., March 10, 1807. His father, James Whitaker, was born in Maryland, near Havre de Grace, and emigrated to Kentucky when quite young; here he followed farming, and worked at the trade of stone and brick m ison until his decease, which occurred in Kentucky about the year 1840; he married, in Kentucky, Cordelia Field; she was born in Maryland, and died in Kentucky, in 1815. The subject of this sketch learned the trade of s brick mason, which he followed, with farming, until 23 years of age, when he was united in marriage with Matilda Barnett upon the 27th of February, 1830 ; she was born in Dayton, Ohio. Nov. 11, 1811; she was the daughter of Moses and Catherine (Ellis) Barnett, who emigrated from Kentucky and located in Empire Township, McLean Co., in the spring of 1831; Mr. Barnett died in 1855; Mrs. Barnett died May 15, 1865. Mr. Whitaker followed farming eight years in Kentucky after his marriage, when he emigrated with his family to Illinois, and landed in Le Roy Dec. 31, 1837: he located upon his present place in 1841, where he has lived for a period of thirty-eight years ; upon his locating here he had no capital, save one team, a strong arm and willing hand; he then purchased forty acres of land on twelve months' time; he then put up a log house, in which he lived some fifteen years, when it gave place to his present pleas. ant and convenient place. Mr. Whitaker has suffered all the hardships and privations of frontier life; he now owns upward of 200 acres of land, which, aside from raising a large family, he has accumulated, with the assistance of his amiable wife, by their hard labor, energy and industry. Their children were ten in number—Charles A., born Nov. 3, 1832; Catherine, Sept. 10, 1834; Mary Jane, July 3; 1836; Alvin, Jan. 29, 1841; George M., Feb. 16. 1843; John 0., May 10. 1815: Alfred and Albert (twins), June 26, 1818, and two deceased; Alvin served in the Union army for upward of three years; at the battle of Petersburg, he was color-bearer of the 39th Regt. ; was wounded and taken prisoner while still holding to the glorious old flag; after laying in rebel prisons, he was paroled; the war closed soon after, and he received his discharge. In politics, Mr. Whitaker has been a life-long Democrat, having cast his first vote for Andrew Jacks n, and has worked hard for the success of the party; he has never sought political honor, but has held some petty offices, among which was School Director in his district for several years.

Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker have trod the path of life peacefully together for nearly half a century, and should their lives be spared but a few short months, by the kindness of the same Providence which has so long watched over and protected them, they will live to witness the anniversary of their golden wedding.

JAMES W. WRIGHT, blacksmith, Le Roy; one of the early pioneers of Illinois ; born in Indiana, Nov. 5, 1827. He emigrated with his parents when 1 year old, and located in Vermilion Co., near Danville, Ill., in the fall of 1828; he was raised to heavy farm labor until 21 years of age, when he met with an accident by a tree falling upon him, which broke his leg and caused him to relinquish farming; he then went to Danville, where he learned and workeu at the blacksmith trade for three years, and, in the winter of 1851, removed to Bloomington, McLean Co., where, after working one year, he came to Le Roy and associated with T. D. Gilmore, in the blacksmith trade two years ; then one year with John Kline, under the firm name of Wright & Kline; then two years with Robert Ingle, when Mr. Wright bought his partner's interest, and continued three years alone; he then admitted his old partner John Kline, which partnership continued two years,since which time Mr. Wright has continued business alone Of town and school offices he has held his share, having been Town Trustee, School Trustee, one of the first Alder. men, and was elected the second Mayor of the city of Le Roy, which office he held for two years. His marriage with Martha F. Gilmore was celebrated Feb. 14, 1853; she was born in Warren Co., Ky., Nov. 21, 1834; nine children were the fruit of this union, four of whom are living, viz.: Matilda, E., born Feb. 3, 1854, now Mrs. Townsend L. Smith ; William, born June 27, 1878; James W., born March 25, 1869; McLean, born March 22, 1877; the deceased are Thomas D., Stephen A. Douglas, Joseph Price, Cora Bell and Francis. Mrs. Wright was the daughter of Thomas D. Gilmore, one of the early settlers of McLean Co., who emigrated from Kentucky, and located in Empire Township, in 1836, where he now lives, at the age of 64 years. Her grand. father lived to the ripe old age of 98. Mr. Wright's mother was one of nine children, all of whom are now living, the youngest being 65 years, and the oldest being 79 years of age. Silas Waters is one of the number. The above family of nine children with their parents crossed the Alleghany Mountains in a two-wheel cart, drawn by one horse, during the year 1814.

JOAN YORK, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 4; P. O. Le Roy; born in Knox Co., Tenn., April 17, 1829; he removed with his parents to Monroe Co., Ind., when quite young, and was brought up on a farm here until 18 years of age, when he enlisted in the 4th Ind. V. I., to serre during the war with Mexico, leaving home June 8, 1847, going down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans, then by vessel to Brazos Santiago, Texas ; from there to Vera Cruz, where he landed in October; he served in Mexico during the war: leaving Mexico in July, 1818, he retured via New Orleans and Cairo, to Madison, Ind., where he received his discharge In the spring of 1819, he emigrated West, and located in Empire Township, McLean Co., III., where

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