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other narcotic drug may be so admitted, transferred, or transshipped. (Feb. 9, 1909, sec. 5; May 26, 1922, sec. 2.)

(a) It shall be unlawful for any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States Government to export or cause to be exported from the United States, or from territory under its control or jurisdiction, or from countries in which the United States exercises extraterritorial jurisdiction, any narcotic drug to any other country: Provided, That narcotic drugs (except smoking opium and opium prepared for smoking, the exportation of which is hereby absolutely prohibited) may be exported to a country only which has ratified and become a party to the convention and final protocol between the United States Government and other powers for the suppression of the abuses of opium and other drugs, commonly known as the International Opium Convention of 1912, and then only if (1) such country has instituted and maintains, in conformity with that convention, a system, which the board deems adequate, of permits or licenses for the control of imports of such narcotic drugs; (2) the narcotic drug is consigned to an authorized permittee; and (3) there is furnished to the board proof deemed adequate by it, that the narcotic drug is to be applied exclusively to medical and legitimate uses within the country to which exported, that it will not be reexported from such country, and that there is an actual shortage of and a demand for the narcotic drug for medical and legitimate uses within such country.

(b) The Secretary of State shall request all foreign Governments to communicate through the diplomatic channels copies of the laws and regulations promulgated in their respective countries which prohibit or regulate the importation and shipment in transit of any narcotic drug and, when received, advise the board thereof.

(c) The board shall make and publish all proper regulations to carry into effect the authority vested in it by this Act. (Feb. 9, 1909, sec. 6; May 26, 1922, sec. 2.)

Any person who exports or causes to be exported any of the aforesaid drugs in violation of the preceding section shall be fined in any sum not exceeding $5,000 nor less than $50 or by imprisonment for any time not exceeding two years, or both. And onehalf of any fine recovered from any person or persons convicted of an offense under any section of this Act may be paid to the person or persons giving information leading to such recovery, and one-half of any bail forfeited and collected in any proceedings brought under this Act may be paid to the person or persons giving the information which led to the institution of such proceedings, if so directed by the court exercising jurisdiction in the case: Provided, That no payment for giving information shall be made to any officer or employee of the United States. (Feb. 9, 1909, sec. 7; Jan. 17, 1914,

, . sec. 3.)

(a) A narcotic drug that is found upon a vessel arriving at a port of the United States or territory under its control or jurisdiction and is not shown upon the vessel's manifest, or that is landed from any such vessel without a permit first obtained from the collector of customs for that purpose, shall be seized, forfeited, and disposed of in the manner provided in subdivision (d) of section 2, and the master of the vessel shall be liable (1) if the narcotic drug

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is smoking opium, to a penalty of $25 an ounce, and (2) if any other narcotic drug, to a penalty equal to the value of the narcotic drugs

(b) Such penalty shall constitute a lien upon the vessel which may be enforced by proceedings by libel in rem. Clearance of the vessel from a port of the United States may be withheld until the penalty is paid, or until there is deposited with the collector of customs at the port, a bond in a penal sum double the amount of the penalty, with sureties approved by the collector, and conditioned on the payment of the penalty (or so much thereof as is not remitted by the Secretary of the Treasury) and of all costs and other expenses to the Government in proceedings for the recovery of the penalty, in case the master's application for remission of the penalty is denied in whole or in part by the Secretary of the Treasury.

(c) The provisions of law for the mitigation and remission of penalties and forfeitures incurred for violations of the customs laws, shall apply to penalties incurred for a violation of the provisions of this section. (Feb. 9, 1909, sec. 8; May 26, 1922, sec. 3.)

This Act may be cited as the “ Narcotic Drugs Import and Export Act.” (Feb. 9, 1909, sec. 9; May 26, 1922, sec. 4.)

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Duty to Stay By.
In

every case of collision between two vessels it shall be the duty of the master or person in charge of each vessel, if and so far as he can do so without serious danger to his own vessel, crew, and passengers (if any), to stay by the other vessel until he has ascertained that she has no need of further assistance, and to render to the other vessel, her master, crew, and passengers (if any), such assistance as may be practicable and as may be necessary in order to save them from any danger caused by the collision, and also to give to the master or person in charge of the other vessel the name of his own vessel and her port of registry, or the port or place to which she belongs, and also the name of the ports and places from which and to which she is bound. (Sec. 1.)

If he fails so to do, and no reasonable cause for such failure is shown, the collision shall, in the absence of proof to the contrary, be deemed to have been caused by his wrongful act, neglect, or default.

Every master or person in charge of a United States vessel who fails, without reasonable cause, to render such assistance or give such information as aforesaid shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be liable to a penalty of one thousand dollars, or imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; and for the above sum the vessel shall be liable and may be seized and proceeded against by

any

district court of the United States by any person; onehalf such sum to be payable to the informer and the other half to the United States. (Sept. 4, 1890, sec. 2.) Motor Boat Law.

The words “ motor boat" where used in this Act shall include every vessel propelled by machinery and not more than sixty-five feet in length except tug boats and tow boats propelled by steam. The length shall be measured from end to end over the deck, excluding sheer: Provided, That the engine, boiler, or other operating machinery shall be subject to inspection by the local inspectors of steam vessels, and to their approval of the design thereof, on all said motor

process in

boats, which are more than forty feet in length, and which are propelled by machinery driven by steam. (Sec. 1.)

Motor boats subject to the provisions of this Act shall be divided into classes as follows:

Class one. Less than twenty-six feet in length.

Class two. Twenty-six feet or over and less than forty feet in length.

Člass three. Forty feet or over and not more than sixty-five feet in length. (Sec. 2.) Every motor boat in all weathers from sunset to sunrise shall

carry the following lights, and during such time no other lights which may be mistaken for those prescribed shall be exhibited.

(a) Every motor boat of class one shall carry the following lights: First. A white light aft to show all around the horizon.

Second. A combined lantern in the forepart of the vessel and lower than the white light aft showing green to starboard and red to port, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on their respective sides.

(b) Every motor boat of classes two and three shall carry the following lights:

First. A bright white light in the fore part of the vessel as near the stem as practicable, so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of twenty points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light ten points on each side of the vessel, namely, from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on either side. The glass or lens shall be of not less than the following dimensions:

Class two. Nineteen square inches.
Class three. Thirty-one square inches.
Second. A white light aft to show all around the horizon.

Third. On the starboard side a green light so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of ten points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on the starboard side. On the port side a red light so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of ten points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on the port side. The glasses or lenses in the said side lights shall be of not less than the following dimensions on motor boats of

Class two. Sixteen square inches.
Class three. Twenty-five square inches.
On and after July first, nineteen hundred and eleven, all glasses

,
or lenses prescribed by paragraph (b) of section three shall be fresnal
or fluted. The said lights shall be fitted with inboard screens of
sufficient height and so set as to prevent these lights from being seen
across the bow and shall be of not less than the following dimen-
sions on motor boats of-

Class two. Eighteen inches long.

Class three. Twenty-four inches long: Provided, That motor boats as defined in this Act, when propelled by sail and machinery or under sail alone, shall carry the colored lights suitably screened but not the white lights prescribed by this section. (Sec. 3.)

(a) Every motor boat under the provisions of this Act shall be provided with a whistle or other sound-producing mechanical appliance capable of producing a blast of two seconds or more in

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