Darwinianism: Workmen and Work

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T. & T. Clark, 1894 - 358 páginas
Pt. I. The workmen : Introductory ; Of contemporary philosophy in the time of Dr. Darwin ; Dr. Thomas Brown and Dr. Erasmus Darwin ; Dr. Erasmus Darwin ; Dr. Robert Waring Darwin ; Charles Darwin -- pt. II. The work : Authorities used, compilation, etc. ; What led to the work and the success of it ; What in Mr. Darwin himself conditioned the work and its success ; The struggle for existence ; The survival of the fittest ; Determination of what the Darwinian theory is ; Design ; Natural selection criticised ; Criticism of natural selection ; Concluding considerations ; Result.

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Página 14 - The impulse of one billiard ball is attended with motion in the second. This is the whole that appears to the outward senses. The mind feels no sentiment or inward impression from this succession of objects: Consequently, there is not, in any single, particular instance of cause and effect, any thing which can suggest the idea of power or necessary connexion.
Página 79 - Whilst on board the Beagle I was quite orthodox, and I remember being heartily laughed at by several of the officers (though themselves orthodox) for quoting the Bible as an unanswerable authority on some point of morality.
Página 227 - I happened to read for amusement 'Malthus on Population', and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long-continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that under these circumstances favourable variations would tend to be preserved, and unfavourable ones to be destroyed. The result of this would be the formation of new species. Here then I had at last got a theory by which to work...
Página 241 - A celebrated author and divine has written to me that he has "gradually learnt to see that it is just as noble a conception of the Deity to believe that He created a few original forms capable of self-development into other and needful forms, as to believe that He required a fresh act of creation to supply the voids caused by the action of His laws.
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Página 143 - I would far rather burn my whole book, than that he or any other man should think that I had behaved in a paltry spirit.
Página 230 - ... natural selection, accumulating those slight variations in all parts of its structure which are in any way useful to it, during any part of its life.
Página 170 - The interest excited was intense, but the subject was too novel and too ominous for the old school to enter the lists, before armouring. After the meeting it was talked over with bated breath : Lyell's approval, and perhaps in a small way mine, as his lieutenant in the affair, rather overawed the Fellows, who would otherwise have flown out against the doctrine.

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