The Works of John Locke: Some thoughts concerning education. An examination of P. Malebranche's opinion of seeing all things in God. A discourse of miracles. Memoirs relating to the life of Anthony, first earl of Shaftesbury. Some familiar letters between Mr. Locke and several of his friends

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C. and J. Rivington, 1824
 

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Página 2 - A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description of a happy state in this world ; he that has these two has little more to wish for; and he that wants either of them will be but little the better for anything else.
Página 299 - For I see no contradiction in it, that the first eternal thinking being should, if he pleased, give to certain systems of created senseless matter, put together as he thinks fit, some degrees of sense, perception, and thought : though, as I think, I have proved, lib.
Página 54 - Tis virtue then, direct virtue, which is the hard and valuable part to be aimed at in education, and not a forward pertness or any little arts of shifting. All other considerations and accomplishments should give way and be postponed to this. This is the solid and substantial good which tutors should not only read lectures and talk of, but the...
Página 260 - And many of the people believed on him, and said, When Christ cometh, will he do more miracles than these which this man hath done?
Página 48 - ... rebukes, and so lessen their authority. And here is another great inconvenience, which children receive from the ill examples which they meet with, amongst the meaner servants. They are wholly, if possible, to be kept from such conversation : for the contagion of these ill precedents, both in civility and virtue, horribly infects children, as often as they come within reach of it. They frequently learn from unbred or debauched servants such language, untowardly tricks and vices, as otherwise...
Página 176 - The writing of letters has so much to do in all the occurrences of human life, that no gentleman can avoid showing himself in this kind of writing...
Página 23 - As the strength of the body lies chiefly in being able to endure hardships, so also does that of the mind. And the great principle and foundation of all virtue and worth is placed in this, that a man is able to deny himself his own desires, cross his own inclinations, and purely follow what reason directs as best, though the appetite lean the other way.
Página 50 - ... as great effects of his care of forming their minds to virtue, and their carriage to good breeding, as of forming their tongues to the learned languages, you must confess that you have a strange value for words, when preferring the languages of the ancient Greeks and Romans to that which made them such brave men, you think it worth while to hazard your son's innocence and virtue for a little Greek and Latin.
Página 163 - ... tis to me the strangest thing in the world that the father should desire or suffer it to be cherished or improved. Methinks the parents should labour to have it stifled and suppressed as much as may be ; and I know not what reason a father can have to wish his son a poet, who does not desire to have him bid defiance to all other callings and business.
Página 278 - God forbid that I should justify you : Till I die I will not remove mine integrity from me. My righteousness I hold fast, and will not let it go : My heart shall not reproach me so long as I live.

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