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engaged at the time of carriage of the explosives or other dangerous articles or substances subject to the regulations in this part, i.e., a cargo vessel, a passenger vessel, a ferry vessel, a railroad car ferry or a barge. § 146.03–8 Dangerous articles defined.

A dangerous article within the meaning of the regulations in this subchapter is an article falling within any of the following classifications: Explosives. Inflammable Liquids. Inflammable Solids and Oxidizing Materials. Corrosive Liquids. Compressed Gases. Poisons. Hazardous Articles. Ships' Stores and Supplies of a Dangerous

Nature. For definitions covering these classifications see the appropriate section within this subchapter. These are $$ 146.20-1146.20-11; § 146.21-1; $ 146.22–1; $ 146.23-1; $ 146.24–1; $ $ 146.25-1146.25-20; $ 146.27-1; and $$ 147.02–1147.02–2. Combustible Liquids are defined in § 146.26–1. (CGFR 53–26, 18 F.R. 5205, Sept. 1, 1953) § 146.03–9 Flammable or inflammable.

For the purpose of the regulations in this subchapter, the words "inflammable” and “flammable," are interchangeable or synonymous terms. (CGFR 51-19, 16 F.R. 7212, July 24, 1951) § 146.03-10 Explosive range.

The vapors of inflammable liquids (and to a lesser extent of combustible liquids) when mixed with air will in proper proportions form an explosive concentration. The low or “lean" limit and the high or “rich" limit vary in accordance with the characteristics of the liquid involved. The mixture or percent by volume between the “lean" and the "rich" mixtures is termed the “explosive range”. Any percentage of the vapor in air between these limits will be likely, upon ignition, to continue to burn with rapidity and violence, sometimes with explosive effects. § 146.03-11 Finely divided metals.

The phrase "finely divided metals" is used to describe metals that have been divided into small parts such as aluminum powder, bronze powder, metal cuttings or borings such as are produced in working metals.

$ 146.03-12 Finely divided organic ma.

terial. This phrase is used to describe organic material such as charcoal, peat moss, sugar, sulfur, sawdust, powderous materials such as flour, granular materials such as seeds, grains, and cereals, or like substances.

146.03-13 Fire point.

The term "fire point" denotes the temperature at which the vapors given off by the substance, if ignited, will continue to burn. The fire point is generally higher than the flash point, although occasionally they coincide as in the case of ether, carbon disulfide, and a few other substances. $ 146.03–14 Flashpoint.

The term "flashpoint” means the temperature at which the substance gives off inflammable vapors which in contact with spark or flame will ignite. § 146.03–15 Hermetically sealed.

The term “hermetically sealed” means perfectly closed or closed airtight by, or as by, fusion, or crimping, so that no gas nor vapor can enter or escape. [Order 74, 6 F.R. 259, Jan. 11, 1941, as amended by Order 103, 6 F.R. 1893, Apr. 11, 1941) $ 146.03–16 Holds gas tight.

This term means that the structural boundaries of the hold are free of openings and constructed suficiently tight to withstand a gas pressure not in excess of 1 pound per square inch. A hold that will withstand a hose test without leakage may be assumed as being gas tight. Cargo or other openings in the structural boundaries of such holds (except over deck cargo hatches) shall be provided with tight closing means. Cargo hatch openings in the over deck provided with hatch covers and tarpaulins are accepted as satisfactory closing means for such compartment or hold. [Order 74, 6 F.R. 259, Jan. 11, 1941, as amended by Order 103, 6 F.R. 1893, Apr. 11, 1941) $ 146.03-17 ICC.

The initials "ICC" refer to Interstate Commerce Commission. § 146.03–18 ICC regulations.

The term "ICC Regulations" when used in the regulations in this part refers to regulations of the Interstate Commerce Commission for "Explosives and Other Dangerous Articles" (49 CFR Parts

71–78) in effect at the time a shipment is moving and subject to the regulations in this part. [Order 74, 6 F.R. 260, Jan. 11, 1941, as amended by CGFR 53–26, 18 F.R. 5205, Sept. 1, 1953) $ 146.03–19 Inside containers.

(a) The following abbreviations when used in the tables indicate that the substance is packed in “Inside Containers” of the following descriptions:

“WIC" means With Inside Containers, which may be glass, earthenware, metal, polyethylene or other authorized materials.

“WIL” means With Inside Liners.

“WIMC” means With Inside Metal Containers.

WIMIL” means With Inside Metal Liners. "WPL” means With Inside Paper Liners.

(b) The inside containers and packing, if required, shall comply with the requirements of the Interstate Commerce Commission Regulations in effect at the time of shipment. (CGFR 53–54, 18 F.R. 8229, Dec. 16, 1953, as amended, CGFR 62–11, 27 F.R. 5280, June 5, 1962] 8 146.03-20 Label.

The term "label" means the caution label required by the regulations in this subchapter and the regulations of the ICC to be affixed to outside containers of explosives or other dangerous articles or substances. § 146.03–21 Marking.

The term "marking” refers to the descriptive name, instructions, cautions, weight data, or specification marks that are required by the regulations in this subchapter and the regulations of the ICC to be placed upon outside containers of explosives or other dangerous articles or substances or combustible liquids. § 146.03–22 Miscible.

For the purpose of the regulations in this part the term “miscible" is applied to liquids, and means such liquids are capable of mixing freely, in many cases in all proportions, with water. § 146.03–23 Miscibility with water,

This term “miscibility with water" is shown in the regulations for the purpose of indicating the adaptability of water in volume in the event of ignition of the liquid. $ 146.03–24 Navigable waters.

Where used in the regulations in this part the term "navigable waters" in

includes the navigable waters of the United States, its Territories and possessions, but not the navigable waters of the Panama Canal Zone. (Order 74, 6 F.R. 259, Jan. 11, 1941, as amended by CGFR 47–35, 12 F.R. 4184, June 27, 1947] 8 146.03–25 N.0.S.

The abbreviation "N.O.S." means not otherwise specified by name in the regulations in this part. § 146.03-26 Not permitted.

The term “not permitted” means the dangerous articles or substances shall not be offered, placed on board, transported, or stored on a vessel subject to the regulations in this subchapter when the term is specifically applied in the regulations in this part to a particular substance or vessel. $ 146.03–27 Outside containers.

The term "outside containers" means the outer over-all container which is authorized by the regulations in this part to be used for the packing of the particular substance. As a rule they are specification containers, but in some instances nonspecification outside containers are authorized. § 146.03–28 Prohibited.

The term “prohibited" is applied to the explosive substances named and described in subsection (3) of R.S. 4472, as amended, and means such explosive substances shall not be offered to any vessel placed on board, transported, or stored on board any vessel within the navigable waters of the United States. § 146.03–29

Shipping papers. For definition of "shipping papers” see $ $ 146.05–12, 146.05-13 and 146.05–14.

146.03–30 Soluble.

For the purpose of the regulations in this part, the term "soluble" means capable of being dissolved in water, forming homogeneous or uniform mixtures. (It is to be noted that some substances freely dissolve and others dissolve very slowly.) § 146.03-31 STC and NRC.

The term "STC” means "single trip container" that must not be reused for shipment of dangerous articles unless approved by the Interstate Commerce Commission. The term “NRC” means "nonreusable container" that must not be reused for shipment of dangerous articles. (CGFR 58-9, 23 F.R. 4839, June 28, 1968] § 146.03–32 Storage.

The term "storage" as used in the regulations in this part means the placing of explosives or other dangerous articles or substances on board a vessel for purposes of safekeeping or accumulation, pending removal therefrom in whole or in part at a subsequent time; the process of “placing on board” and “removing therefrom” occurring without movement of the vessel being involved. $ 146.03–33 Stowage.

For the purposes of the regulations in this subchapter the term "stowage" embraces the art of placing and securing goods on board a vessel within the holds of the vessel, or on the decks, in such manner as to enhance safety during the period of transportation. $ 146.03–34 Stowage terms defined.

For the purposes of the regulations in this part the following stowage terms are defined:

(a) “On deck in open” means the articles may be stowed on the open weather deck of a vessel. Such cargo may be protected from the elements if necessary or advisable.

(b) "On deck protected" means the articles may be stowed on the open weather deck of a vessel. It is required that dangerous cargo stowed under such conditions shall be protected from the elements by structural erections or from the direct rays of the sun by means of awnings or dunnaging.

(c) “On deck under cover" means the articles may be stowed on the weather deck of a vessel under covered erections, such as forecastle, bridge house, poop, and deck houses, having permanent structural openings to the atmosphere, but no structural openings such as doors, hatches, companionways, or manholes to any living quarters, cargo carrying, or other compartments, unless such doors, hatches, companionways, or manholes are provided with hinged means for closing off and securing such openings. Stowage shall not be utilized in any deck house containing living quarters, a steering engine or refrigerating unit or refrigerated stowage boxes unless the areas occupied by such units are isolated from the stowage area by permanent and tight metallic division bulkheads.

(d) “Cargo hatch trunkway” means the articles may be stowed in a cargo hatch trunkway provided the trunk is constructed of steel without openings ex. cept such openings as are fitted with positive closing means, provided further, that noncombustible hatch closing means, or combustible hatch covers metal lined all over, are fitted at the lower terminus of the trunk securely closing off the cargo hold from the trunkway. A cargo hatch trunkway the upper terminus of which is located in a tween deck space shall not be utilized for such stowage unless fitted with steel hatch covers and then only when such terminus is always visible and accessible during the voyage.

(e) “Tween decks readily accessible" means the articles may be stowed in upper cargo spaces below or off the weather deck, and so stowed as to be readily accessible from the cargo openings (but not in the square of the hatch of the latter is made up of wooden hatch covers) or in a shelter deck directly in. board of structural openings from the weather deck. A vessel having cargo carrying holds which extend from the tank top or lower flat to the weather deck and having no enclosed cargo stowage space imposed above such single holds may substitute “Under deck away from heat” in lieu of “Tween decks readily accessible" stowage.

(f) “Tween decks" means the articles may be stowed in an upper cargo space below or off the weather deck, or in a shelter deck space. Any openings in the bulkheads forming boundaries of such tween deck spaces shall be fitted with positive closing means. Hatches shall be provided with a full complement of covers. After stowage of cargo all openings shall be closed and remain closed during the voyage, except for such ingress and egress as is necessary in the operation of the vessel.

(g) "Under deck away from heat" means the articles may be stowed in a cargo space in a deep hold or a tween deck hold capable of being ventilated and not subject to heat from any artificial source. Holds of which any boundary bulkhead or deck forms part of the boundary of a boiler room, engine room, coal bunker, or galley shall not be utilized for this type of stowage unless the dangerous substances are stowed not less than twenty (20) feet away from such bulkheads: provided, however, that this limitation shall not apply to cargo spaces in holds adjacent to the engine room of vessels fitted with internal combustion engines.

NOTE: Order 146, Sept. 10, 1941, 6 F.R. 4668, provides in part as follows: Any vessel having a wooden bulkhead constructed at least eight (8) inches off a boiler room, engine room, coal bunker or galley bulkhead, when one of these bulkheads forms a boundary of a cargo carrying compartment, and transporting a substantially full cargo of sisal or other vegetable fibers (except cotton), and such portion of the sisal or other vegetable fibers cargo (except cotton) as is stowed “Tween decks” or “Under deck away from heat” are exempt from that provision of g 146.03-34(g) of the regulations of the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard governing the transportation of explosives or other dangerous articles on board vessels which requires that such substances be stowed at least 20 feet away from boiler room, engine room, coal bunker or galley bulkhead.

All other provisions of the regulations applying to sisal or other vegetable fibers (except cotton) and all other applicable provisions of the general and detail regulations shall be observed.

(h) “Under deck" means that the articles may be stowed in a cargo space in a deep hold or a tween deck hold capable of being ventilated. A hold is defined as an area allotted entirely to the carriage of cargo and is bounded by permanent steel bulkheads and decks, and the shell of the vessel, the deck openings being provided with means for effectively closing the hold against the weather, and in the case of superimposed holds, effectively closing off each hold. A cargo space or hold coming within the above definition shall not be used for the stowage of explosives (except fireworks or relatively safeClass C-explosives) unless closed off to traffic while the vessel is on its voyage. A cargo space or hold containing a crew passage formed by battens or by a mesh or wire screen bulkhead shall not be used for stowage of other dangerous articles or substances, including fireworks and relatively safe explosives-Class C, unless watchman service is provided for such areas.

(i) (Reserved)

(j) "Under deck but not overstowedmeans the articles may be stowed in a cargo space in any hold as defined under paragraph (h) of this section, the characteristics of dangerous articles SO stowed being such as to prevent the stowage of any other type of cargo over same.

(k) "Ferry stowage (AA)” means that a highway vehicle loaded with any per

mitted explosives or other dangerous articles or substances, or combustible liquids in conformity with all the applicable provisions of these regulations, may be transported on board a ferry Vessel when stowed as directed by the vessel's representative. The vehicle need not be in a position to jettison but should be stowed as to be easily accessible.

(1) "Ferry stowage (BB)” means that a railroad vehicle loaded with any permitted explosives or other dangerous articles or substances ur combustible liquids in conformity with all the applicable provisions of the regulations in this part, may be transported on board a railroad car ferry when stowed in a location away from sources of artificial heat. The vehicle need not be in position to jettison but should be easily accessible. Railroad car ferries accepting highway vehicles loaded with any permitted dangerous substances indicated as utilizing “Ferry stowage (AA)” shall stow such vehicle away from sources of artificial heat and easily accessible. § 146.03–35 Vapor density.

The term "vapor density” is the relative density of the vapor given off by an infiammable liquid as compared with air. A figure less than one (1) indicates a vapor lighter than air and a figure greater than one (1) indicates a vapor heavier than air. § 146,03–36 Vessels defined.

For the purposes of the regulations in this subchapter passenger carrying vessels or passenger vessels, barges and cargo vessels are defined as follows:

(a) Passenger carrying vessels or passenger vessels. (1) A passenger carrying vessel or a passenger vessel is any vessel which carries passengers: Provided, That no vessel of the following classes shall be considered a passenger carrying vessel or a passenger vessel:

(1) Any vessel subject to any of the provisions of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1948, which neither carries nor is authorized to carry more than 12 passengers.

(ii) Any cargo vessel documented under the laws of the United States and not subject to that Convention which neither carries nor is authorized to carry more than 16 persons in addition to the crew.

(iii) Any cargo vessel of any foreign nation that extends reciprocal privileges and not subject to that Convention which neither carries nor is authorized

come

to carry more than 16 persons in addition to the crew.

(2) Any passenger vessel that is not designed and built to receive railroad vehicles shall be considered a passenger ferry if it is engaged in a ferry operation.

(3) Any passenger vessel that is designed and built to receive railroad vehicles shall be considered a railroad car ferry.

(b) Barge. Any non self-propelled vessel having no passengers on board, shall be considered a barge.

(c) Cargo vessel. (1) Any vessel other than a passenger vessel or a barge shall be considered a cargo vessel.

(2) Any passenger ferry or railroad car ferry during any period it is being operated authority of a change of character certificate issued by an Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection. [Order 74, 6 F.R. 259, Jan. 11, 1941, as amended by CGFR 50–16, 15 F.R. 4503, July 15, 1950; CGFR 53–26, 18 F.R. 5205, Sept. 1, 1953) § 146.03–37 Volatility.

The term "volatility” is used to indicate the tendency of a liquid to assume the vapor state. The tendency of a liquid to evaporate is influenced by other factors than the vapor pressure. Increased volatility will result from the influence of a rise in temperature. $ 146.03–38 W.T.

The abbreviation "W.T." means watertight. $ 146.03–39 W or W/0.

The abbreviation “W” or w/o" mean "With” or “Without” (i.e. Ammunition for cannon w/o projectiles). (CGFR 56–29, 21 F.R. 7054, Sept. 20, 1956) Subpart 146.04—List of Explosives or

Other Dangerous Articles Containing the Shipping Name or Description of Articles Subject to the Regulations in this Subchapter SOURCE: $ $ 146.04-1 to 146.04–5 contained in Order 74, 6 F.R. 261, Jan. 11, 1941, except as otherwise noted. § 146.04–1 Proper shipping name.

The proper shipping name which shall be used and shown on bill of lading or other shipping paper and on outside of shipping containers where required by the regulations in this subchapter, appears in this list in roman type (not italics).

§ 146.04–2 Dangerous articles not

named. Any article not properly described by a name shown in this commodity list when such article classifies under the definitions contained herein as a dangerous article shall be prepared and offered for shipment in compliance with the regulations in this part. $ 146.04–3 Classification.

This list shows the classification of each permitted article or substance. It also shows the articles or substances that are prohibited by the provisions of R. S. 4472, as amended, or that are not permitted by the regulations in this part, for transportation or storage on board vessels. § 146.04–4 Signs and abbreviations.

The meaning of the signs and abbreviations used in $ 146.04–5 are as follows:

(*) Asterisk indicates the article may or may not

within the classification shown. If, in accordance with the definitions contained berein, the article does come within the classification it is subject to the regulations in this part. Inf. L.

Inflammable Liquid. Inf. S.

Inflammable Solid. Oxy. M.

Oxidizing Material. Cor. L.

Corrosive Liquid. Inf. G...

Inflammable Compressed

Gas. Noninf. G.----- Noninflammable Com

pressed Gas. Pois. A----- Poison Gas or Liquid, Class

A. Pois. B.

Poisonous Liquid or Solid,

Class B. Pois. C.

Tear Gas, Class C. Pois. D.

Radioactive Material, Class

D.
Expl. A--- Class A Explosives.
Expl. B..

Class B Explosives.
Expl. C.

Class C Explosives. Comb. L.

Combustible Liquid. Haz..

Hazardous Article. Prohibited Means prohibited by R. S

4472, as amended. Not permitted.. Means not permitted by

the regulations in this

subchapter.
No restrictions. Means this item is shown

in the regulations only to
distinguish it from arti.
cles under similar name
that are classed as dan.

gerous.
(Order 74, 6 F.R. 261, Jan. 11, 1941, as
amended by Order 103, 6 F.R. 1893, Apr. 11,
1941; CGFR 53-26, 18 F.R. 5205, Sept. 1,
1953

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