The Mating Mind: How Sexual Choice Shaped the Evolution of Human Nature

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Vintage, 2001 - 538 páginas
Many aspects of the human mind remain mysterious. While Darwinian natural selection can explain the evolution of most life on earth, it has never seemed fully adequate to explain the aspects of our minds that seem most uniquely and profoundly human - art, morality, consciousness, creativity and language. Yet these aspects of human nature need not remain evolutionary mysteries. Until fairly recently most biologists have ignored or rejected Darwin's claims for the other great force of evolution - sexual selection through mate choice, which favours traits simply because they prove attractive to the opposite sex. But over recent years biologists have taken up Darwin's insights into how the reproduction of the sexiest is as much a focus of evolution as the survival of the fittest.Witty, powerfully-argued and continually thought-provoking, Miller's cascade of ideas bears comparison with such critical books as Richard Dawkins' The Selfish Gene and Steven Pinker's The Language Instinct. It is a landmark in our understanding of our own species.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - Drifter83 - LibraryThing

I am always impressed when very smart people in very technical fields can effectively explain their work to the rest of us. Miller does this, and he does it in an entertaining (and sexy) way.What I ... Leer comentario completo

The mating mind: how sexual choice shaped the evolution of human nature

Crítica de los usuarios  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Miller (senior research fellow, Centre for Economic Learning and Social Evolution, Univ. Coll., London) here argues that the human mind and human behaviorDincluding language and moralityDhave evolved ... Leer comentario completo

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Acerca del autor (2001)

Geoffrey Miller studied at Columbia, Stanford, Sussex and Munich Universities and until recently was at University College, London. He now teaches at the University of New Mexico.

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