Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

and prepared, filled up, and executed in such manner as the Secretary of the Treasury may from time to time prescribe.

SEC. 3125. If the master of any enrolled or licensed vessel shall neglect or fail to comply with any of the provisions or requirements of the nine preceding sections, such master shall forfeit and pay to the United States the sum of twenty dollars for each and every failure or neglect, and for which sum the vessel shall be liable, and may be summarily proceeded against, by way of libel, in any district court of the United States.

SEC. 3126. Any vessel, on being duly registered in pursuance of the laws of the United States, may engage in trade between one port in the United States and one or more ports within the same, with the privilege of touching at one or more foreign ports during the voyage, and land and take in thereat merchandise, passengers and their baggage, and letters, and mails. All such vessels shall be furnished by the collectors of the ports at which they shall take in their cargoes in the United States, with certified manifests, setting forth the particulars of the cargoes, the marks, number of packages, by whom shipped, to whom consigned, at what port to be delivered, designating such merchandise as is entitled to drawback, or to the privilege of being placed in warehouse; and the masters of all such vessels shall, on their arrival at any port of the United States from any foreign port at which such vessel may have touched, as herein provided, conform to the laws providing for the delivery of manifests of cargo and passengers taken on board at such foreign port, and all other laws regulating the report and entfy of vessels from foreign ports, and be subject to all the penalties therein prescribed.

SEC. 3127. Any foreign merchandise taken in at one port of the United States to be conveyed in registered vessels to any other port within the same, either under the provisions relating to warehouses, or under the laws regulating the transportation coastwise of merchandise entitled to drawback, as well as any merchandise not entitled to drawback, but on which the import duties chargeable by law shall have been duly paid, shall not become subject to any import duty by reason of the vessel in which they may have arrived having touched at a foreign port during the voyage.

Sec. 3128. When any merchandise shall be imported from Canada into the United States, in any steamboat on Lake Champlain, and the merchandise shall have been duly entered, the duties thereon paid at the office of the collector of any district adjoining Lake Champlain, it shall be lawful to land such merchandise in the same or any other district adjoining Lake Champlain.

SEC. 3129. The Secretary of the Treasury, with the approbation of the President, provided the latter shall be satisfied that similar privileges are extended to vessels of the United States in the colonies hereinafter mentioned, is hereby authorized, under such regulations as he may prescribe, to protect the revenue from fraud, to permit vessels laden with the products of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island, or either of them, to lade or unlade at any port within any collection-district of the United States which he may designate ; and if any such vessel entering a port so designated, to lade or unlade, shall neglect or refuse to comply with the regulations so prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, such vessel, and the owner and master thereof, shall be subject to the same penalties as if no authority under this section had been granted to lade or unlade in

such port.

(THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS OF THE REVISED STATUTES AND STATUTES AT LARGE APPLY TO IM.

PORTATIONS.]

TOBACCO AND CIGARS.

SEC. 3377. All manufactured tobacco and snuff (not including cigars) imported from foreign countries shall, in addition to the import duties imposed on the same, pay the tax imposed by law on like kinds of tobacco and snuff manufactured in the United States, and have the same stamps respectively affixed. Such stamps shall be affixed and cancelled on all such articles so imported by the owner or importer thereof, while they are in the custody of the proper custom-house officers, and such articles shall not pass out of the custody of said officers until the stamps have been affixed and cancelled. Such tobacco and snuff shall be put np in packages, as prescribed by law for like articles manufactured in the United States before the stamps are affixed; and the owner or importer shall be liable to all the penal provisions prescribed for manufacturers of tobacco and snuff manufactured in the United States. Whenever it is necessary to take any such articles, so imported, to any place for the purpose of repacking, affixing, and cancelling such stamps, other than the public stores of the United States, the collector of customs of the port where they are entered shall designate a bonded warehouse to which they shall be taken, under the control of such customs officer as he may direct. And every officer of customs who permits any such articles to pass out of his custody or control without compliance by the owner or importer thereof with the provisions of this section relating thereto, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall be fined not less than one thousand or more than five thousand dollars, and imprisoned not less than six months nor more than three years. Provided, That scraps, cuttings, and clippings of tobacco imported from any foreign country may, after the proper customs duty has been paid thereon, be withdrawn in bulk without the payment of the internal-revenue tax, and transferred as material directly to the factory of a manufacturer of tobacco or snuff, or of a cigar manufacturer, under such restrictions and regulations as shall be prescribed by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue and approved by the Secretary of the Treasury. [As amended, Act of March 1, 1879.]

SEC. 3386. There shall be an allowance of drawback on tobacco, snuff, and cigars on which the tax has been paid by suitable stamps affixed thereto before removal from the place of manufacture, when the same are exported, equal in amount to the value of the stamps found to have been so affixed; the evidence that the stamps

ere

so affixed, and the amount of tax so paid, and of the subsequent ex portation of the said tobacco, snuff, and cigars, to be ascertaiued under such regulations as shall be prescribed by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, and approved by the Secretary of the Treasury. Any sums found to be due under the provisions of this section shall be paid by the warrant of the Secretary of the Treasury on the Treasurer of the United States, out of any money arising from internal duties not otherwise appropriated : Provided, That no claim for an allowance of drawback shall be entertained or allowed until a certificate from the collector of customs at the port from which the goods have been exported, or other evidence satisfactory to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, has been furnished, that the stamps affixed to the tobacco, snuff, or cigars entered and cleared for export to a foreign country were totally destroyed before such clearance ; nor until the claimant has filed a bond, with good and sufficient sureties, to be approved by the collector of the district from which the goods are shipped, in a penal sum double the amount of the tax for which said claim is made, that he will procure, within a reasonable time, evidence' satisfactory to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue that said tobacco, snuff, or cigars have been landed at any port without the jurisdiction of the United States, or that after shipment the same were lost at sea, and have not been relanded within the limits of the United States. [As amended by Act of March 1, 1879.]

SEC. 3402. All cigars imported from foreign countries shall pay, in addition to the import duties imposed thereon, the tax prescribed by law for cigars manufactured in the United States, and shall have the same stamps affixed. The stamps shall be affixed and cancelled by the owner or importer of the cigars while they are in the custody of the proper custom-bouse officers, and the cigars shall not pass out of the custody of such officers until the stamps have been so affixed and cancelled, but shall be put up in boxes containing quantities as prescribed in this chapter for cigars manufactured in the United States, before the stamps are affixed. And the owner or importer of such cigars shall be liable to all the penal provisions of this Title prescribed for manufacturers of cigars manufactured in the United States. Whenever it is necessary to take any cigars so imported to any place other than the public stores of the United States, for the purpose of affixing and cancelling such stamps, the collector of customs of the port where such cigars are entered shall designate a bonded warehouse to which they shall be taken,under the control of such customs officer as such collector may direct.

* * *

[Here follows a penalty for infractions of the above by customs officers and by section 3103 a penalty is imposed for selling imported cigars not put up and stamped as required by section 3402.]

[By Act of March 3d, 1883, it is provided as follows:]

SEC. 4. That on and after May first, eighteen hundred and eighty-three, the internal taxes on snuff, smoking, and manufactured tobacco sball be eight cents per pound; and on cigars which shall be manufactured and sold or removed for consumption or sale on and after the first day of May, eighteen hundred and eightythree, there shall be assessed and collected the following taxes, to be paid by the manufacturer thereof:

On cigars of all descriptions, made of tobacco or any substitute therefor, three dollars per thousand ;

On cigarettes weighing not more than three pounds per thousand, fifty cents per thousand ;

On cigarettes weighing more than three pounds per thousand, three dollars per thousand :

1. Snuff is that article known and used in the trade as such. 2. Granulated tobacco and snuff are not synonymous terms.

Venable v. Richards, 105 U. S. 636.

VALUE OF FOREIGN COINS.

SEC. 3564. The value of foreign coin as expressed in the money of account of the United States shall be that of the pure metal of such coin of standard value ; and the values of the standard coins in circulation of the various nations of the world shall be estimated annually by the Director of the Mint, and be proclaimed on the first day of January by the Secretary of the Treasury.

See Cramer v. Arthur, supra, under § 2903. The actual value of an importation of wool was less than 12 cents per pound at the place and time of purchase; the value was stated in the invoice in roubles, which by the valuation fixed by the Secretary for coins, brought the value of the wool above 12 cents and doubled the rate of duty. Held that the collector and importer were bound by the Secretary's proclamation in force at the time of actual importation, although at time of purchase by the importer abroad a lower valuation to the rouble obtained, which would have reduced the value of the wool below 12 cents. Heinemann v. Arthur's Errs., 120 U. S. 82.

SEC. 3565. In all payments by or to the Treasury, whether made here or in foreign countries, where it becomes necessary to compute the value of the sovereign or pound sterling, it shall be deemed: equal to four dollars eighty-six cents and six and one-half mills, and the same rule shall be applied in appraising merchandise im ported where the value is, by the invoice, in sovereigns or pounds sterling, and in the construction of contracts payable in sovereigns or pounds sterling; and this valuation shall be the par of exchange between Great Britain and the United States; and all contracts made after the first day of January, eighteen hundred and seventyfour, based on an assumed par of exhange with Great Britain of fiftyfour pence to the dollar, or four dollars forty-four and four-ninths cents to the sovereign or pound sterling, shall be null and void.

« AnteriorContinuar »