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In Cincinnati, Chicago, Detroit, and Milwaukie, there were 92,932, being 17 per cent. of their number in the Western and Northwestern States, comprising Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa. In the cities of St. Louis and Louisville, there were 50,858, being 43 per cent. of the number in the Southwestern States of Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas. In the cities of Baltimore, Richmond, Charleston, Mobile, and New Orleans, there were 94,924, being 54 per cent. of those in the Southern Atlantic States of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, and Louisiana.

An examination of the Census returns of 1850, will disclose these facts: That near 40 per cent of the foreign population then in the State of New York, resided in the cities of New York and Albany; that over one-fourth of those in Massachusetts were in Boston ; that there were 40 per cent. of those in Rhode Island, in Providence; that about one-sixth of those in Connecticut, resided in the cities of Hartford and New Haven; that the city of Newark alone had one-fifth of those in New Jersey; and Philadelphia about 40 per cent of those in Pennsylvania. So in the Southern States. Mobile had about 60 per cent. of the foreign population of Alabama; New Orleans, over 70 per cent. of those in Louisiana ; Savannah, about 37 per cent. of those in Georgia ; Charleston, considerably over one-half of those in South Carolina ; Louisville, near 40 per cent. of those in Kentucky; St. Louis, over one-half of those in Missouri; Nasbville and Memphis, over 40 per cent. of those in Tennessee; Baltimore, about 67 per cent. of those in Maryland; and Wilmington, about one-third of those in Delaware. And the same may be said of the Western States. Of those in Ohio, over one-fourth were in Cincinnati; of those in Illinois, over one-eighth in Chicago; of those in Michigan, about one-sixth in Detroit; and of those in Wisconsin, over one-ninth in Milwaukie.

A still further and more minute examination of the Census statistics of 1850, will disclose the fact, that of the 196,609 born in Ireland, residing in the New England States, there were over one-fourth of them in the cities of Boston, Portland, Providence, Portsmouth, Hartford, New Haven, and Manchester ; of the 525,926 residing in the States of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, 224,685 of them were in the cities of New York, Philadelphia, Newark and Albany, being over 40 per cent. ; and of those in the other non-slave-holding States, numbering 134,810, there were 26,594 in the cities of Cincinnati, Chicago, Detroit, and Milwaukie. Of the 104,374 in the slave States, 50,062 were in the cities of New Orleans, Baltimore, Charleston, Louisville, Savannah, Nashville, Memphis, Richmond, St. Louis, Washington, and Wilmington.

Of those from Ireland, residing in Massachusetts, nearly one-third were in Boston ; of those in Maine, one-sixth were in Portland; of those in Rhode Island, about one-half were in Providence; of those in Connecticut, one-fifth were in Hartford and New Haven; of those in New York, over 40 per cent. were in New York and Albany; of those in New Jersey, over one-sixth were in Newark; of those in Pennsylvania, nearly one-half were in Philadelphia ; of those in Ohio, over one-fourth were in Cincinnati; of those in Illinois, near one-fourth were in Chicago ; of those in Missouri, over two-thirds were in St. Louis ; of those in Michigan, near one-fourth were in Detroit; of those in Maryland, almost twothirds were in Baltimore; of those in Louisiana, over 80 per cent. were in New Orleans; of those in South Carolina, over one-half were in Charleston ; of those in Alabama, two-thirds were in Mobile ; of those in Kentucky, one-third were in Louisville ; of those in Tennessee, nearly one-half in Nashville and Memphis ; and of those in Georgia, one-half in Savannah.

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The Germans in the New England and Middle States were also principally in the cities and towns. Of the 7,000 in New England, about 2,500 were in the cities of Boston, Hartford, New Haven, Providence, Portland, and Portsmouth ; of the 210,360 in the Middle States of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, 85,859 were in the cities of New York, Philadelphia, Albany, and Newark; of those in the free States of the west, about one-fifth were in the cities of Cincinnati, Chicago, Detroit, and Milwaukie ; and of the 127,335 in the slave-holding States, over one-half were in the cities of Baltimore, Richmond, Washington, Wilmington, Charleston, Savannah, Mobile, New Orleans, St. Louis, Louisville, Memphis, and Nashville. Of those in Massachusetts, over 40 per cent. were in Boston ; of those in New York, about one-half were in New York city and Albany; of those in New Jersey, about one-third were in Newark; of those in Pennsylvania, about 30 per cent. were in Philadelphia ; of those in Ohio, about 30 per cent. were in Cincinnati ; of those in Illinois, about one-seventh were in Chicago; of those in Missouri, about one-half were in St. Louis, of those in Maryland, over two-thirds were in Baltimore; and of those in Kentucky, over one-half were in Louisville ; of those in Louisiana, near two-thirds were in New Orleans.

The English, Welsh and Scotch, were chiefly in the cities and towns. One-twelfth of the whole number of English and Welsh, and one-tenth of the Scotch, were in New York city. The French, Spanish and Italians, were also chiefly in the cities and

Considerably over one-fourth of the French were in the cities of New York, Philadelphia, and New Orleans. There were 1,150 Spaniards in New Orleans, 303 in New York, 291 in Philadelphia, 144 in Mobile : making an aggregate in these four cities of 1,888, and considerably over one-half of the whole number in the country. Of the Italians, 708 were

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in New York, 658 in New Orleans, 236 in Philadelphia, 152 in Cincin-'. nati, 134 in Boston, 112 in Louisville, and 101 in St. Louis : making an aggregate in these seven cities of 2,160, and more than one-half of their

and more than one han number in the Union.

A late California authority, quoted by Professor De Bow, in his Census report to Congress, in 1854, estimates the population of that State to be as follows: 215,000 Americans, 25,000 Germans, 25,000 French, 20,000 Spaniards, 17,000 Chinese, 5,000 other foreigners, 20,000 Indians, and 2,500 Negroes: making an aggregate of over 320,000, about one-third of whom are not natives of the United States. Of late years the Chinese immigration has increased immensely, and the number of these pagans is already so great in California as to prove the source of much difficulty, and to be a cause of considerable alarm to its inhabitants. According to a late report of Captain Heurtier, the number of immigrants from Hong Kong to California, up to the 30th of June, 1854, amounted to 45,000; to Australia (wives and children included), to 15,000. From January 1st to June 30th, 1854, 10,496 immigrants left Hong Kong for California, and 4,341 for Australia.

Another subject worthy of more attention than it has yet received, is that of the Mormon immigration. In a few years more, Utah will be a flourishing and powerful State, a large majority of whose citizens will be foreigners who are not naturalized and owe no sworn allegiance to the United States. Some statistics have recently been collected concerning the amount of immigration from Great Britain alone to Utah, which has taken place within the last year past, and the aggregate will be somewhat surprising to those unacquainted with the extensive system of proselytizing which the Mormons have now organized throughout Europe. The following is the statement as published, dating from the 27th of November, 1854, to the 26th of April, 1855 :

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