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8th, 429 ; 9th, 412; 10th, none; 11th, none ; 12th, none; 13th, 1; 14th, none; 15th, none.

The number of persons naturalized for fifteen days before and five days after the 5th of November, 1843, including that day, were as follows:

On the 7th, 241 ; 9th, 1; on the 7th November, 241; 9th, 1 ; on the other days, none.

The number naturalized for fifteen days before and five days after the 5th November, 1844, including that day, was as follows:

On the 21st October, 44; 22d, 47; 23d, 29; 24th, 33; 25th, 78; 26th, 83; November 4th, 127; 5th, 117; and the other days, none. I will add, that I am not able to answer as to the number of persons naturalized from the 1st October, 1840, to the 1st of May, 1843; because I was not then clerk of the court; and no register of persons naturalized appears to have been kept previous to the time of my appointment. And on examination of the minutes during that period, I am satisfied that it was not the practice of the clerk in all cases to enter in the minutes the names of persons naturalized. I have therefore no means of ascertaining the fact, except by examining the original papers, which would take more time than can be allowed me. And for the same reason, I cannot answer as to the number of persons naturalized in each of the last four years, ending at the fall election, further than I have already answered.

I would further add, that these calculations have been made with some haste ; but I believe them to be correct. I will add, on reflection, that among the persons naturalized on the day of the last fall election, and for some few weeks previous, there was a considerable number who stated themselves to be residents of other counties of this State than the city and county of New York; but the proportion of such persons to the whole number I cannot state.

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NUMBER NATURALIZED AT NEW ORLEANS.

Needler R. Jennings, being duly sworn, did depose and say: That he is Clerk of the United States District court, for the Eastern District of Louisiana; that, during the past year of 1844, there were 181 persons naturalized in said court, at the following periods, to wit: In the month of January, 4; in February, 2; in March, 6; in April, 7; in May, 4; in June, 7; in September, 6; in October, 95; in November, 49; in December, 1-total, 181. That during the same year, in said court, there were 112 declarations of intention to become citizens made by foreigners, at the following periods, to wit: In the month of January, 1; in February, 2; in March, 3; in April, 3; in May, 2; in June, 2; in July, 2; in August, 8; in September, 3; in October, 49; in November, 26 ; in December, 11-total, 112. Clerk's Office, Circuit Court of the United States, Fifth Circuit, and District of

Louisiana: I certify the foregoing to be a correct statement of the number of declarations of intention and certificates of naturalization issued from my office during the year 1844, viz. : 83 declarations of intention, and 89 certificates of naturalization, during the period above stated.

Witness my hand and the seal of the court, at New Orleans, this 3d of May, A. D. 1845.

For DUNCAN W. HENNEN, Clerk,

J. McCULLOCH, Deputy Clerk. State of Louisiana, City Court of the City of Lafayette : I, Edmond Burthe, judge of the City court of the city of Lafayette, do hereby certify, that, from the examination of the minutes of this court, it results :

That in the year 1841, B. C. Elliott being judge, 11 aliens were admitted citizens of the United States.

That in the year 1842, B. C. Elliott, judge, 13 aliens were admitted citizens of the United States.

That in the year 1843, the same B. C. Elliott, judge, 1,798 aliens were admitted citizens of the United States.

That in the year 1844, J. N. Carrigan being then judge, from the 18th April to the 30th December, 333 aliens were admitted citizens of the United States ; and that 130 aliens made the declaration required by law of their intention to become citizens of the United States.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of the court, this 28th day of April, A. D. 1845.

EDMOND BURTHE, Judge.

John L. Lewis, being duly sworn, did depose and say, that he is now, and has been for a number of years past, Clerk of the First Judicial District court of the State of Louisiana, held in the city of New Orleans.

That from the records of said court it appears, that in the past year of 1844 there were 187 certificates of naturalization granted to foreigners by said court, and that 28 declarations of intention to become citizens were made before the same, at the following periods, to wit:

Certificates of naturalization granted : In the month of January, 1; in February, 5; in March, 9; in April, 2; in May, 2; in June, 8; in July, 3; in August, 15; in September, 6; in October, 112; in November, 22 ; in December, 2 total, 187.

Declarations of intention to become citizens: In the month of February, 1; in March, 2; in April, 1; in May, 1; in June, 2; in August, 3; in September, 1; in October, 11; in November, 4; in December, 2-total, 28.

Victor Sere, being duly sworn, did depose and say, that he is the Deputy Clerk of the Parish court, in and for the parish of Orleans.

That from the records of said court it appears, that in the past year, 1844, there were 31 certificates of naturalization granted to foreigners, and 107 declarations of intention to become citizens, entered before said court at the following periods, to wit:

Certificates of naturalization granted: In the month of February, 1; in March, 5; in May, 1; in June, 2; in July, 9; in August, 7; in September, 5; in November, 1total, 31.

Declarations entered : In the month of January, 2; in March, 1; in April, 1; in May, 3; in June, 1; in July, 39; in August, 29; in September, 23; in November, 6; in December, 2-total, 107.

That during the present year of 1845, up to the present time, there have been 5 certificates of naturalization issued, and 21 declarations of intention to become citizens, entered in said court.

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Edward Gardere, Esq., being duly sworn, did depose and say, that he is at this present time, and has been for the last year, Clerk of the Commercial court of New Orleans. That in the year 1844 there were 58 foreigners naturalized by said court, at the following periods, to wit:

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Number of persons naturalized in the District and Circuit courts of the United States, from February 5, 1823, to January 1, 1845, 171.

GEORGE W. MORTON, Deputy Clerk.

CHAPTER XXII.

QUALIFICATIONS OF ELECTORS IN TERRITORIES.

LEGISLATION in relation to the qualifications of electors in the Territories of the United States, has not been uniform. The celebrated ordinance of 1787, establishing the Northwest Territory, which was passed prior to the formation of the Federal Government, provided that when the Territory should have five thousand male inhabitants over

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twenty-one years of age, it should have a legislative government, and that the right of suffrage should belong to all who were citizens of one of the United States, and had certain property qualifications; and that provision was successively extended

to the different Territories organized out of the northwestern Territory. It was also in substance extended to the Territories southwest of the Ohio, not in precisely the same form, but by a general provision that the inhabitants of the southwestern Territory should be entitled to all the right, &c., enjoyed by those of the northwestern Territory under the ordinance of 1787.

A similar provision was inserted in the act organizing the Mississippi Territory in 1798; and the policy of 1787 seems to have been invariably pursued until 1808, when an act was passed restricting the elective franchise of that Territory to those who were citizens of the United States and possessed certain property qualifications.

In 1812, on admitting Illinois into the second grade of Territorial Governments, the act provided that every free white male person, having attained the age of twenty-one, paid a territorial or county tax, and resided one year in the Territory, should enjoy the right of suffrage. The act organizing Missouri, passed the same year, contained a similar provision. In 1817, the Territory of Alabama was organized, and in that instance the precedent of 1812 was disregarded and that of 1787 followed. Arkansas was organized in 1819, and the precedent of 1812 was again adopted. In 1836, the elective franchise in Wisconsin was made the same as that of Missouri in 1812, except that the freehold qualification was not required. The same course was pursued with Iowa in 1838. The act organizing Minnesota, passed 1849, departed again from the precedent of 1812, which had with a single modification been followed in 1819, '36 and 38, by adding the following words to the proviso: "and those who shall have declared, on oath, their intention to become such, and shall have taken an oath to support the Constitution of the United States, and the provisions of this act." The acts organizing Oregon and Washington Territories contain similar provisions to that of Minnesota. Those establishing Utah and New Mexico contain the Missouri provision, and confine the elective franchise to citizens of the United States.

During the pendency of the bill to establish the Territorial Governments of Kansas and Nebraska, John M. Clayton introduced, in the Senate, an amendment, confining the elective franchise in those Territories to citizens of the United States, which gave rise to an animated debate, as will be seen by reference to the Appendix Congressional Globe of 1853 -54, p. 297. The amendment was to strike out the following :

" And those who shall have declared, on oath, their intention to become such, and shall have taken an oath to support the Constitution of the United States and the provi-'; sions of this act."

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So that the proviso will read:

Provided, That the rights of suffrage and of holding office shall be exercised only by citizens of the United States."

Jobo Pettit, of Indiana, opposed this amendment, and among other remarks, made the following:

Mr. President, in my views of propriety and policy, I shall be constrained to vote against the amendment, for the few brief reasons which I shall assign. In my State we recently held a constitutional convention, and put into it a clause the same in substance, if not in words, as that which it is now proposed to strike out of this bill. We did it after the fullest consideration and the fullest discussion. Allow me to say that I believe no injury has arisen, and none will arise from it; but, on the contrary, very great harmonizing, salutary results are produced by it. It does not follow at all that a man who has come from abroad, from Ireland, England, France, or Germany, understands any better our institutions or his local wants because he has taken two oaths, as is required in the bill as it stands, than though he had taken but one oath. But, sir, in a broader and more comprehensive view of the subject, I am in favor of the provision as it stands in the bill.

I live in the midst of a dense foreign population—Irish and German-and I now say that I believe no such thing can be found on record as a foreign party anywhere got up where they have declared, “ we are foreigners; we will vote thus because we are foreigners.". On the contrary, when they come here, they range themselves directly under the Whig or Democratic parties—mostly, I graut you, under the Democratic party, for they come here with their sympathies and their feelings with that party of liberty contradistinguished from the treatment they have had at home. They have been led to believe before they come here, and immediately on coming here they see the broad distinction between the parties

the one going for the utmost liberty that man can rightfully enjoy, the other voting to restrict, control and limit their liberty. They find immediately which party it is that has gone for the earliest naturalization, and they know almost instinctively who it was promulgated and advocated the alien and sedition laws. They know the party of liberty, of progress, and of freedom, and they know the party that opposes and grudges every right they receive and have ever enjoyed.

I am against the amendment of the Senator of Delaware. It proposes to exclude from suffrage and from office a large proportion of voters in several of the western States, who are, at least, so far fellow-citizens with us that we conceive ourselves bound to interfere for their protection against aggression in foreign lands. They are clothed, as the Secretary of State has said, with American nationality, and certainly so far citizens as justify and require their full admission to equal privileges and rights in every respect, with our own native born citizens in the Territories. I hope the amendment will be rejected.

David R. Atchison, of Missouri, said

Now, sir, in the State of Missouri—and that is one of the northwestern States, although it is generally, from its institutions, classed as one of the southwestern States no person can exercise the right of suffrage or hold office unless he be a citizen, of the United States; and, with due deference, I think it a good rule to apply to all the Territories of this Union.

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