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BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS
OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, ;014

221

SIXTIETH CONGRESS.

FIRST PRINT, No. 41.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1908.

WASIINGTON:
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

HF 1756
·A3

1908

COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

SERENO E. PAYNE, Chairman. JOHN DALZELL.

NICHOLAS LONGWORTH. BAMUEL W. MCCALL

EDGAR D. CRIMPACKER. EBENEZER J. HILL.

CHAMP CLARK. HENRY S. BOUTELL.

WILLIAM BOURKE COCKRAN, JAMES C. NEEDHAM.

OSCAR W. UNDERWOOD. WILLIAM A. CALDERHEAD.

D. L. D. GRANGER. JOSEPH W. FORDNEY.

JAMES M. GRIGGS. JOSEPH H. GAINES.

EDGAR W. POU. ROBERT W. BONYNGE.

CHOICE B. RANDELL

WILLIAM K. PAYNE, Clerk.
II

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COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS,

Tuesday, December 22, 1908. (The committee this day met, Hon. Sereno E. Payne in the chair.) ADDITIONAL STATEMENT OF MR. W. A. GRAHAM CLARK, OF

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Mr. CLARK. I am here to answer any question, but I would like to make one statement before that. Mr. Longworth asked me a question during the last hearing in regard to the difference of cost in production in England and America on some samples of Bradford stuffs that I submitted, four samples, and on which I showed the comparative cost in England and America. He called my attention to the fact that the weaving wage in America seemed to be four and one-quarter times that in England, and I told him that that was too large. I desire to call attention to the fact that the dyeing wage in England was separate, and if the dyeing wage was included with the weaving wage, so as to compare it exactly with the American, including the cost of the yarn and the finished cloth

The CHAIRMAN. As I understand your statement, it contains both the weaving and the dyeing wage in this country, but only the weav, ing wage in Great Britain; is that it? Mr. CLARK. Yes, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. Can you give us the weaving and the dyeing wage for both countries?

Mr. CLARK. On sample A, which is a cashmere made of cotton and low botany wool, the total cost in England is 15.6 cents a pound. In America the total cost is 26 cents a pound. The cost of the yarn to make that cloth in England is 9.3 cents a pound and in the United States it is 15.4 cents a pound; that is the cost of the yarn to make the cloth. The weaving wage in England would be 2.1 cents a pound and in the United States it would be 6.4 cents a pound, which is about three times. All other expenses in England would be 4.2 cents a pound and in the United States 4.2 cents a pound, making a total cost of 15.6 cents in England to our total cost of 26 cents. The figures of cost I gave before were correct, excepting that they were not exactly proportioned for comparison. In the English case they put the dyeing cost separate and in the American case it includes the weaving and the dyeing wage. One-third of the dyeing charge shown is for labor, which should be included in the total weaving wage. The CHAIRMAN. How is it on all-wool goods?

Mr. CLARK. That was on cotton and wool goods. On sample C, which is an all-wool sateen, the total cost in England is 31.12 cents

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