Report of the Federal Trade Commission on the Grain Trade, Volúmenes1-3

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1920

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Geographical distribution of different types of elevators
49
Individual mill elevators
51
Geographical distribution of warehouses
57
Diagram F Per cent distrlbution by types of elevators in each of 14
58
Average capacity of elevators and warehouses_
61
Average capacity of elevators and warehouses in the United
62
Construction materials of elevators and warehous
68
Materials of which elevators were constructed in specified
69
Character of the discussion
74
Distribution of mill elevators by specified States in comparison
79
Reasons for cooperative development
83
Effects of opposition to cooperatives
90
Numbers and percentages of cooperative elevators and ware
92
Number and percentage of elevators in specified States report
98
Outright sales by farmer to the elevator
99
Sale of grain by contracts
112
Variations in crop production and country elevator marketings
115
Seasonal variations in country elevator purchases
118
Diagram G Proportions of wheat corn oats rye and barley marketed
119
Monthly distribution of total grain purchases in specified States
122
Handling country elevator shipments
125
Number of cars shipped to specified markets receiving more
129
Relation of size of terminal markets to country grain movement
131
Shipments in territory outside ChicagoMinneapolis tributary
137
Shipments to interior brokers and others by kind of grain
143
Distribution of country elevator shipments of specified grains
144
Explanation of variations in grains
149
Number and proportion of cars of grain sold by country ele
150
Variations in elevation by type of house_
155
Variations of different types of elevators in cleaning facilities
161
Sideline business of country elevators_
168
Average number of price information services reported
181
Determination of country prices
187
Average buying margins of different types of elevators on speci
192
Summary of interviews on buying margins
195
Explanation of the profits and losses involved
203
Some technical details of country elevator hedging
212
not hedging in specified States and grand divisions
214
Type variations in hedging
219
Competition in grading and dockage_
256
Character of cooperative or farmer and mill elevator competition
262
Line elevator price policy
269
Lineelevator policies in meeting competition
275
Division of receipts
282
Closing and wrecking elevators on a rental basis
288
166
290
Letter of the President to the Chairman of the Federal Trade
315
Form of contract between country elevator and farmer
321
St Louis Daily Market Reporter facing
326
Construction materials of elevators and warehouses in specified
331
lules
333
Total purchases of each of the five principal grains made
339
1
340
185
342
Proportion of elevators handling specified side lines in the 14
345
Sources of price information
346
192
349
Average annual production of oats in the principal producing States
12
Average maximum and minimum rates of interest paid
14
Export grain rates from 10 primary markets to 6 Atlantic and Gulf
51
Receipts of grain at Cincinnati St Louis and Chicago in 1858 60
60
Movement of wheat corn and oats eastward from Chicago by fiveyear
70
Classification of interests represented on board of directors of
76
Elevator storage distribution at Chicago March 31 1868
102
Classification of resident members in the grain trade Milwaukee
135
Distribution of countryelevator shipments of specified grains
142
Classification of resident members in the grain trade Minneapolis
143
194
153
Distribution of country elevator shipments of specified grains
13
Scale ticket 103
103
1
157
Daily price card 176
176
Memberships of Pillsbury Flour Mills Co interests at Minneapolis
184
Diagram A Per cent ratio of commercial line elevators to all classes
198
Results of mixing operations in wheat by two Duluth elevator com
313
SECONDARY OR INCIDENTAL FUNCTIONS OF COUNTRY
321
Character of purchases of wheat reported by 198 wheat flour milling
332

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Página 91 - The true test of legality is whether the restraint imposed is such as merely regulates and perhaps thereby promotes competition or whether it is such as may suppress or even destroy competition. To determine that question the court must ordinarily consider the facts peculiar to the business to which the restraint is applied; its condition before and after the restraint was imposed; the nature of the restraint and its effect, actual or probable. The history of the restraint, the evil believed to exist,...
Página 101 - In this connection it must also be borne in mind that, although in 1874 there were in Chicago fourteen warehouses adapted to this particular business, and owned by about thirty persons, nine business firms controlled them, and that the prices charged and received for storage were such "as have been from year to year agreed upon and established by the different elevators or warehouses in the city of Chicago, and which rates have been annually published in one or more newspapers printed in said city,...
Página 269 - As liquidated damage, the seller shall pay to the purchaser not less than five per cent., nor more than ten per cent, of the value of the commodity as established by the committee ; the percentage, within said limits, to be such as In the judgment of the committee, may be just and equitable. Settlement shall be made without delay, and the damage, as determined under the provisions of this section, shall be due and payable Immediately upon the finding of the committee.
Página 100 - State having not less than one hundred thousand inhabitants, "in which grain is stored in bulk, and in which the grain of different owners is mixed together, or in which grain is stored in such a manner that the identity of different lots or parcels cannot be accurately preserved.
Página 320 - ... ascertain the facts bearing on alleged violations of the antitrust acts, and particularly upon the question whether there are manipulations, controls, trusts, combinations, conspiracies, or restraints of trade out of harmony with the law or the public interest.
Página 69 - Washington is in grain which passes through the elevators of Chicago. In this way the trade in grain is carried on by the inhabitants of seven or eight of the great States of the West with four or five of the States lying on the seashore, and forms the largest part of interstate commerce in these States.
Página 36 - South: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.
Página 141 - ... and that it is deliverable upon the return of the receipt, properly endorsed by the person to whose order it was issued, and the payment of proper charges for storage.
Página 69 - the great producing region of the West and North-west sends its grain by water and rail to Chicago, where the greater part of it is shipped by vessel for transportation to the seaboard by the Great Lakes, and some of it is forwarded by railway to the Eastern ports. . Vessels, to some extent, are loaded in the Chicago harbor, and sailed through the St. Lawrence directly to Europe. . The quantity [of grain] received in Chicago has made it the greatest grain market in the world.
Página 119 - Whoever contracts to have or give to himself or another the option to sell or buy, at a future time...

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