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THE

SPECTATOR.

WITH

&Mt\ts nf t|t tiun nf tjit Slntjinrs,

AN INDEX,
EXPLANATORY NOTES.

IN TWELVE VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

PHILADELPHIA:

CRISSY & MARKLEY,

AND THOMAS, COWPERTHWAIT & CO.

1853.

[graphic]

ADVERTISEMENT.

The publisher of the present edition of the SpecTator has been desirous of adapting it to the convenience of all readers. The objection to a small type for a book so generally read, it will be perceived is completely obviated, and the size of the volumes renders it portable as a travelling companion. By referring to the Index in the last volume, which is arranged alphabetically for the original eight volumes, the reader may at once turn to any particular subject contained in the work.

The Spectator not only contains a vast fund of entertainment for the general reader, but it abounds with maxims and principles which may be rendered useful to every generation, and is, perhaps, the best history that can be referred to for a knowledge of the manners and peculiarities of the people of England in the days of Steele and Addison. It has an undiminished sale in England, and its popularity must increase with the extension of education and literature in this country.

In stereotyping this work, every care and attention has been bestowed upon it, to render it worthy the patronage of the public.

PREFACE.

Perhaps there is no book in the English language that has been so generally read and admired as the Spectator. It was so popular at the time of its publication, that twenty thousand papers were sometimes sold in a day. Nor has its reputation ever been on the decline. Notwithstanding the number of similar works, it still retains its place at the head of periodical writings, like the moon among the stars. Few years have passed without producing one or two editions of it; and so extensive has been the sale, that it forms one of the books of every person who has any pretensions to a library. Nor is the excellence of the Spectator inferior to its reputation. It was the joint production of several of the most distinguished genuises of the age; of men who possessed at once taste, learning, and religion, and who were influenced by an honourable desire of correcting the errors and improving the manners of society.

The plan of the Spectator was original, ingenious, and well executed. It enabled the authors to convey instruction in a form which could never give offence; but which, on the contrary, was fitted to attract the giddy, to charm the man of pleasure, as well as to edify the serious and thoughtful. The variety of its subjects is astonishing; the fopperies of dress are elegantly ridiculed; the improprieties in the manners of common life are humorously exposed; the principles of criticism are

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