"Fiction Distorting Fact": The Prison Life, Annotated by Jefferson Davis

Portada
Mercer University Press, 1987 - 168 páginas
This new study of 'Prison life' places the work and these two years in proper perspective. Davis was imprisoned and Craven was assigned to be his physician, not much more than that should be accepted as fact. This edition reproduces Davis's annotations and comments from his personal copy, along with editorial notes and explanations. It also provides a clear, objective description of Davis's life at Fort Monroe, based on evidence and Davis's own letters from prison.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

PREFACE
vii
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
ix
INTRODUCTION
xi
CHAPTER 1
1
CHAPTER 2
5
CHAPTER 3
10
CHAPTER 4
15
CHAPTER 5
20
CHAPTER 13
74
CHAPTER 14
80
CHAPTER 15
85
CHAPTER 16
90
CHAPTER 17
94
CHAPTER 18
102
CHAPTER 19
108
CHAPTER 20
114

CHAPTER 6
26
CHAPTER 7
32
CHAPTER 8
37
CHAPTER 9
43
CHAPTER 10
54
CHAPTER 11
60
CHAPTER 12
68
CHAPTER 21
119
CHAPTER 22
128
CHAPTER 23
136
APPENDIX
141
BIBLIOGRAPHY
151
INDEX
165
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 110 - Tho' they may gang a kennin wrang, To step aside is human : One point must still be greatly dark, The moving Why they do it ; And just as lamely can ye mark, How far perhaps they rue it. Who made the heart, 'tis He alone Decidedly can try us, He knows each chord its various tone, Each spring its various bias : Then at the balance let's be mute, We never can adjust it ; What's done we partly may compute, But know not what's resisted.
Página 57 - There is that maketh himself rich, yet hath nothing: there is that maketh himself poor, yet hath great riches.
Página 143 - Whereas it appears from evidence in the Bureau of Military Justice that the atrocious murder of the late President, Abraham Lincoln, and the attempted assassination of the Hon. William H. Seward, Secretary of State, were incited, concerted, and procured by and between Jefferson Davis, late of Richmond, Va., and Jacob Thompson, Clement C.
Página 148 - I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend it." I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Página 25 - Or man, or woman. Yet I argue not Against Heaven's hand or will, nor bate a jot Of heart or hope, but still bear up and steer Right onward.
Página xli - But the true theory is, that all pretended acts of secession were, from the beginning, null and void. The States can not commit treason, nor screen the individual citizens who may have committed treason, any more than they can make valid treaties, or engage in lawful commerce with any foreign power. The States attempting to secede placed themselves in a condition where their vitality was impaired, but not extinguished...
Página 143 - In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this...
Página xii - I'm not trying to be funny, smart. I just want to understand it if I can and I dont know how to say it better. Because it's something my people haven't got. Or if we have got it, it all happened long ago across the water and so now there aint anything to look at every day to remind us of it...
Página xix - The past is dead; let it bury its dead, its hopes and its aspirations. Before you lies the future, a future full of golden promise, a future of expanding national glory, before which all the world shall stand amazed. Let me beseech you to lay aside all rancor, all bitter sectional feeling, and to take your places in the ranks of those who will bring about a consummation devoutly to be wished — a reunited country.

Acerca del autor (1987)

Jefferson Davis was born in Kentucky but grew up in Mississippi. After graduating from West Point in 1828, he served at frontier military posts and in the Black Hawk War. He resigned from the military in 1835. For the next 10 years, he managed his brother's isolated plantation in Mississippi. In 1845, he entered the world of politics as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Davis's reputation as a historian rests on one work - The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1878-81), an account based in large measure on his own intimate experiences. Chosen by the provisional congress as president of the Confederate States of America in 1861, Davis faced criticism throughout his tenure. After Lee surrendered without his approval, Davis was indicted by the federal government for treason. Although he spent several years in prison, he was never brought to trial. In 1867, he was released on bond, and he retired to his estate, Beauvoir, on the Gulf of Mexico in Mississippi. There he wrote The Rise and Fall to vindicate the South in general and his presidency in particular.

Información bibliográfica