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But how he will come, and whither he goes, There's never a scholar in England knows.

God has given a kindlier power To the favoured strawberry-flower. Hither soon as spring is fled You and Charles and I will walk; Lurking berries, ripe and red, Then will hang on every stalk, Each within its leafy bower ; And for that promise spare the flower !

1802.

He will suddenly stop in a cunning nook,
And ring a sharp 'larum ;—but, if you should look,
There's nothing to see but a cushion of snow
Round as a pillow, and whiter than milk,
And softer than if it were covered with silk.
Sometimes he 'll hide in the cave of a rock,
Then whistle as shrill as the buzzard cock ;
-Yet seek him,-and what shall you find in the

place!
Nothing but silence and empty space;
Save, in a corner, a heap of dry leaves,
That he's left, for a bed, to beggars or thieves !

CHARACTERISTICS OF A CHILD THREE

YEARS OLD. Loving she is, and tractable, though wild ; And Innocence hath privilege in her To dignify arch looks and laughing eyes ; And feats of cunning ; and the pretty round Of trespasses, affected to provoke Mock-chastisement and partnership in play. And, as a faggot sparkles on the hearth, Not less if unattended and alone Than when both young and old sit gathered round And take delight in its activity ; Even so this happy Creature of herself Is all-sufficient ; solitude to her Is blithe society, who fills the air With gladness and involuntary songs. Light are her sallies as the tripping fawn's Forth-startled from the fern where she lay couched ; Unthought-of, unexpected, as the stir Of the soft breeze ruffling the meadow-flowers, Or from before it chasing wantonly

The many-coloured images imprest Upon the bosom of a placid lake.

As soon as 'tis daylight to-morrow, with me
You shall go to the orchard, and then you will see
That he has been there, and made a great rout,
And cracked the branches, and strewn them about ;
Heaven grant that he spare but that one upright

twig
That looked up at the sky so proud and big
All last summer, as well you know,
Studded with apples, a beautiful show!

Hark! over the roof he makes a pause,
And growls as if he would fix his claws
Right in the slates, and with a huge rattle
Drive them down, like men in a battle :
-But let him range round; he does us no harm,
We build up the fire, we ’re snug and warm ;
Untouched by his breath see the candle shines bright,
And burns with a clear and steady light;
Books have we to read, but that half-stifled knell,
Alas ! 'tis the sound of the eight o'clock bell.
-Come now we 'll to bed ! and when we are there
He may work his own will, and what shall we care?
He may knock at the door,— we'll not let him in ;
May drive at the windows,—we 'll laugh at his din ;
Let him seek his own home wherever it be ;
Here's a cozie warm house for Edward and me.

1806.

1811.

VI.

ADDRESS TO A CHILD, DURING A BOISTEROUS WINTER EVENING.

BY MY SISTER.

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