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Little more could be attempted in so limited a treatise than to give specimens of the several kinds of lessons proper to be given; but by studying the principles laid down in the work, the teacher may extend the series on each subject for himself. This may at first cause some difficulty; yet it will be found in the end, that those lessons which are the result of study are better taught and better understood, than such as are adopted ready made. No new theory is attempted to be set forth in the present work, such plans only being given as have been tested by experience, and found to promote the happiness and improvement of young children.

Infant Model School,
Office of National Education,

Dublin.

CONTENTS.

108

Development of Moral Ideas,

God

110

Creation

112

Life

114

The Mind

116

Conscience

119

Hope

121

Love, Fear

123

Additional Subjects

124

Sacred History

The Trial of Abraham's Faith 125

The Raising of Lazarus 129

POETRY

Verses for very little children..

Infant Prayer

Repentance

Obedience

Brotherly Love

Children brought to Jesus

Morning Hymn

God made the Sky

Myself

God's care of us

The Creation

God is in Heaven

Hymn

Morning Hymn

Evening Hymn

188

189

189

190

191

191

192

193

193

194

194

195

195

196

197

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245

203
203
203
204
204
205
205
206
206
207
2018
208
209
209
210
210
211
211
211
212
213
214
214
215
216
216

The Little Dog
Little Pussy
The Busy Bee
The North Wind
The Bodily Powers
The Lark
Spare the Insect
Lambs
The Fly
The Donkey
The Seed
Fortitude
Cleanliness
Playing with Fire
Facts for Little Folks
Tea and Sugar
Waste not Want not
One thing at a time
Play and Work
The Rainy Day
My Mother
Evening
Infant School Song
The Village Green
Butter Cups and Daisies
The Flowers
Pleasures of Industry and Con-

tentment

The Ant and Cricket

The Falling Rain

The Infant School

Song on Cheerfulness

Early to Bed

Industry

Pity for the Micted

The Runaways

Life and Labour

Perseverance

The Months

Spring

Summer

Autumn

Winter

The wineral Kingdom

SINGING

217

217

218

219

220

220

220

221

222

222

223

223

224

225

226

226

227

Music to Songs,

Spring,

Summer,

Autumn,

Winter,

One thing at a time,

The Falling Rain,

The Fly

The Village Green,

The Rainy Day,

Life and Labour,

Morning Thoughts,

Teaching from the Stars,

Morning Hymn
Infant's Prayer
Hymn for Infants

Note on School arrangements and

appointments.

THE TEACHER'S MANUAL.

INFANT SCHOOLS.

The idea of collecting very young children forelementary instruction is not new: schools for infants having long existed under the name of Dame Schools. Indeed the embarrassment arising from the union of children widely differing in age, generally led either to the separation of the younger portion, or to their entire neglect. Very little observation and reflection are required to convince us of the marked disparity in the state of mind in children of various ages, which, when we address them familiarly, we involuntarily admit, by bringing our language and ideas to their level; and they themselves generally divide into groups, according to their age, for conversation or play. No judicious teacher overlooks this fact, or attempts to unite in one class pupils of five

age, with others of ten and twelve. therefore, in the mere collecting of young children together, but in the kind of instruction given, and in the mode of communicating it, that the Infant School system differs essentially from any previous form of elementary teaching. Under the old system little was attempted until the child had learned to read; and, during this long and painful interval, the monotony of the school-room was seldom varied by anything to interest or amuse the little pupil. No physical exercises relieved the wearied body, but all was starched formality, and, what was called, good order. Immured in a close dull room_all

years of

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the joyous freedom of infancy repressed—the eyes vacantly poring over the unexplained mysteries of learning's first page, the only motives to exertion being the dread of the fool's cap, or of the

“ Tway birchen sprays, with anxious fear entwin'd;

With dark distrust and sad repentance filled ;
And steadfast hate, and sharp affliction join'd,

And fury uncontroll’d, and chastisement unkind." With such a system was it wonderful that the little sufferer longed to escape from school as from a prison house—that small progress was made—and, worst of all, that the temper and disposition were too often irremediably injured? But, with the advancing intelligence of the present century, it began to be perceived and felt that something more was required for the happiness and good of infancy than this, at best, negative system; that, in fact, much could be done in the formation of character and good habits, as well as in the development of the intellectual and physical powers, even with children in the earliest stages of life: hence, Infant Schools arising in an age of high intelligence, have had impressed upon them, at their commencement, enlarged and philosophical principles. Throwing aside, as unfit, all previously existing systems, the Infant School legislates for its pupils in accordance with their age and state, basing its plans on the simplicity of nature; taking advantage of those restless instincts, which were the terror of former teache it makes them subservient to the most perfect training, subduing to cheerful orderly activity that incessant restlessness, which, when suppressed, constantly breaks out in irregularities. That troublesome curiosity which so often annoys us in the young, is made to produce the rapid and apparently spontaneous development of the intellectual faculties; while the ever springing love of infancy opens the heart to receive the seeds of the purest virtue.

The following extract from an eminent Continental

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