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THE

SHIPPING-LAWS

OF

THE BRITISH EMPIRE:

CONSISTING OF

PARK ON MARINE INSURANCE

AND

ABBOTT ON SHIPPING.

EDITED BY

GEORGE ATKINSON, SERJEANT-AT-LAW,
AUTHOR OF “INTERNATIONAL LAW,” “THE SHERIFF LAW," ETC.

LONDON:
LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMANS.

1854.

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1, INNER Temple LANE.

April 25th, 1854.

My LORD,

Many years ago I resolved that I would, if spared, attempt to restore “ Park on Marine Insurance,” and “ Abbott on Shipping," to their original simplicity and design. The result of this resolve is now before you, under one cover and under one title, namely, “ The Shipping Laws of the British Empire.”

To effect this, I chose an early edition of each work ; which, as you know, were small 8vos sold at a few shillings, and so simple that he who ran could read them.

I have religiously kept them, as they originally were, works on general principles ; being well persuaded of this, that whoever attempts to make a law-book serve at once the threefold purpose of a treatise on general principles, statutes at large, and law reports, must fail to make it good for anything. Do not misunderstand me in saying so. I have omitted no Act of Parliament, nor any reported case that I know of. I have done this—where either the one or the other interfered with the original text, there I have introduced it not in extenso (a system no less derogatory to learning than injurious to the utility of a book) but analysed, abridged, and incorporated with

the text.

The way in which I have introduced the different Acts of Parliament is exemplified by the Pilot Acts (6 Geo. 4, c. 125; 16 and 17 Vict., c. 129); the Mercantile Marine Act 1850 (13 and 14 Vict., c. 93); the Mercantile Marine Act Amendment Act (14 and 15 Vict., c. 96); the Steam Navigation Act 1851 (14 and 15 Vict., c. 79); the Passengers Act 1852 (15 and 16 Vict., c. 44); the Customs Consolidation Act 1853 (16 and 17 Vict., c. 107); the Consolidation Register Act (8 and 9 Vict., c. 89); the Navigation Acts (12 and 13 Vict. c. 29, and 16 and 17 Vict., c. 131); the Wreck and Salvage Consolidation Act (9 and 10 Vict., c. 99); and the like. There is, at this moment, a Bill before Parliament for throwing open to the foreigner our Coasting Trade ; but as it has not yet received the Royal assent I cannot treat it as part of the law of the land. The way in which a judicial decision is introduced is exemplified by the case of Irving v. Manning in the first page of the work.

I have drawn largely upon the learning and industry found in the reports in the Admiralty Courts and in the Privy Council -- upon arguments and judgments equal to, if not surpassing, in excellence, those in the time of the great Lord Stowell. I have not overlooked foreign codes and ordinances. The ordinances of Louis XIV., although no longer the law of France, are so frequently referred to and quoted by Lord Tenterden, that I could not strike them out and substitute the Code de Commerce ; I have, therefore, left them as they were ;

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