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OLMA
ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS
1914

L

INDEX TO THE FOURTH VOLUME.

Reviews.

The Balloon

79

Cottage of Rosa, on visiting the 170

Barrett's Heroine

218 Days of Yore

344

Carnot on the Defence of Fortified Places 265 Delence of Fort M'Henry

433
Correspondence between Fox and Wake- The Dead Twins

518

field

89 Indian Gold Coin, Verses to

346

Cuvier on the Theory of the Earth 206 Kiss of the Rose

517

Damiano og Chess

273 Lines in Remembrance of a Lady the

Edgeworth's Patropage

Author saw but once

256

Essays on the Pleasures of Literary

to a Fire-Fly

434

Composition

105 Melo-drame, on the

171

Feinaigle's Art of Memory

117 Sabbath Morning

109

Horsley's Speeches in Parliament 268 Sonnet to *****, on a Moonlight View

Kirsao's Sermons

457 of Highland Scenery

78

Mare's Travels

353 to the same

ib.

Moore's Irish Melodies

282 Spencer, Rev. Thomas, Verses on the

Mudford's Life of Cumberland

368 Death of

347

Musical Biography

441 Stanzas on a Picture of Newstead

Nelson's Letters

452 Park

166

Semple's Tour

36 Tell-tale Eyes

256

Sir Hornbook

286 Tomb of the Humming Bird

344

Southey's Carmen Triomphale

19

Suinine Détails sur Moreau

25 DOMESTIC LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC

Tableau de la Litterature pendant le

INTELLIGENCE.

XVIII. Siecle

177

American Biographical Works

174

ORIGINAL

Buckminster's Sermons

262

Benschouten, Rev. Mr. V.

263

84

Biography of Barlow

higelow Flora

130

-Lord Byron

Clagessourg, Battle of

68

437

-Gov. Colden

307

Campaigns of Western Army

351

Cicero, Translations of

-Gen. Pike

380

261

Clarke's Naval History

174

-Capt. Porter

225

-Gen. Scott

Homer, New York edition of 520

Collections of New York Historical

Earthquake at Venezuela

B01

763

., Society

Ichthyology, Mitchill on

349

Porter's Journal

436

Cotcosh's Manual

289, 356

Review of Hunt's Feast of the Poets

520

243

Dunlap's Life of Brown

349

-Peters' History of Connecticut 49 Eustaphieve's Peter the Great

520

-Waterman's Life of Calvin

Harper's Works

42

The Lost Traveller

Henry's Herbal

435

158
Vanity and Flattery, a Vision

Gumipere's Surveying
486

175
French Statistics

175
Lafon's Urano Geography

83

SPIRIT OF FOREIGN MAGAZINES, &c. Literary and Philosophical Society,

Transactions of

350

Account of a familiar Spirit
313 Mr. Leslie

173
Arts, Present State of in England 489 Marion, Life of

521
Bona parte, Character of

513 Melsbesmer's Insects of Pennsylvania 83

Day by the Fire,

409 Mitchill op Fish

84

Entrecasteaux, Chev. D’, Petition of 339 Muhlenberg's Botany

83

Hunt, Leigh, Memoir of

73 New England Magazine

350

Johnson's, Dr. Preface

250 Original Pieces in prose and verse 520

252 Palmer's Register

172

Monks of La Trappe

430 Rodman's Commercial Code

81

Porson's Character of Gibbon

515 Reid's Works

262

Smith on Psalmody

435

Postky.

Wait's State Papers

261

Wellington, Life of

172

Arabian Deserted Village
257 Wheaton's Digest

437
79 Wilson's Ornithology

519

465

May-Day

Ballad

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Patronage. By Maria Edgeworth: Author of Tales of

Fashionable Life, Belinda, Leonora, &c. 4 vols. 8vo.

London, 1814.

[From the Edinburgh Review, for January, 1814.]

None of our regular readers, we are persuaded, will be sur-
prised at the eagerness with which we turn to every new produc-
tion of Miss Edgeworth's pen. The taste and gallantry of the
age may have at last pretty generally sanctioned the ardent admi-
ration with which we greeted the first steps of this distinguished
lady in her literary career ; but the calmer spirits of the south
cap bardly yet comprehend the exhilarating effect which her re-
appearance uniformly produces upon the saturnine complexion of
their northern reviewers. Fortunately, a long course of good
works has justified our first sanguine augury of Miss Edgeworth's
success, and the honest eulogy we pronounced upon her efforts in
the cause of good sense and virtue; and it is no slight consolation
to us, while suffering under alternate reproaches for ill-timed seve-

Vol. IV. Ner Series. 1

rity, and injudicious praise, to reflect, that no very mischievous effects have as yet resulted to the literature of the country from this imputed misbehaviour on our part. Powerful genius, we are persuaded, will not be repressed even by unjust castigation; nor will the most excessive praise that can be lavished by sincere admiration ever abate the efforts that are fitted to attain to excellence. Our alleged severity upon a youthful production has not prevented the noble author from becoming the first poet of his time ; and the panegyrics upon inore than one female writer, with which we have been upbraided, have not relaxed their meritorious exertions to add to the instruction and amusement of their age. In the prosecution of our thankless duties, it is, indeed, delightful now and then to meet with authors who neither dread the lash nor the spur; whose genius is of that vigorous and healthful constitution as to allow the fair and ordinary course of criticism to be administered, without fear that their ricketty bantlings may be crushed in the correction. No demands on the tenderness of the schoolmaster; -no puling appeal to sex or age ;-no depreciation of the rod! Praise may be awarded-severe truth may be told--and the reviewer be as guiltless of the blame which the author may afterwards incur—as he is uniformly held to be excluded from any share of the fame he may ultimately achieve.

Such a writer is Miss Edgeworth. In her case, we are not obliged to insinuate, to venture, to hint, but called upon openly to pronounce our opinion. The overweening politeness which might be thought due to her sex is forgotten in the contemplation of her manly understanding, and of a long series of writings, all directed to some great and paramount iinprovement of society ;to destroy malignant prejudices, and bring down arrogant pretenBious—to reconcile humble merit to its lot of obscure felicity, and expose the misery that is engendered on the glittering summits of human fortune, by the pursuits of frivolous ambition or laborious amusement--to correct, in short, the vulgar estimate of life and happiness, by exposing those errors of opinion which are most apt to be generated by a narrow observation, and pointing out the importance of those minor virtues and vices that contribute most largely to our daily sufferings or enjoyments. Her earlier essays were addressed to the middling classes of society. In her later productions, she has aspired to be the instructress of the fashionable world; a pursuit in wbich we ventured to predict that her direct success, at least, would not be extremely encouraging. We do not know whether she begins to think so too; but it seems to us that she has endeavoured to unite both these objects in the work before usa short analysis of which we shall present, without farther discussion, to our readers.

The work is intended, as its title indicates, as a picture of the miseries resulting from a dependence on patronage, in every form

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