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THIRD ESTATE OF THE SOUTH, THE.........

.Rev. A. D. Mayo.........

299
UNCLEAN FICTION, OUR.......

..Joshua W. Caldwell......

434
UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, THE.............

........ Charles Morton Strahan, C. & M. E............
Illustrations: Josiah Meigs, LL, D., First President of Franklin College; The Campus, Showing Chapel and Library;

Moses Waddell D.D.; Alonzo Church, D.D.; A Corner of the Picture Gallery; The Chancellor's Residence; Andrew
A. Lipscomb, D.D., LL.D.; Patrick H. Mell, D.D., LL.D.; William Ellison Boggs, D.D., LL, D., Present Chan-

cellor of the University of Georgia; the Old College Dormitory.
WALL-FLOWER, THE STORY OF A...

... Dorothy Prescott...
WITCH OF WINNACUNNETT, THE..........

....Mabel Loomis Todd......

............... 587
WOMAN OF SHAWMUT, A. IV ...

......................Edmund Janes Carpenter................
WOMEN'S WORK IN SCIENCE .......
...................... Sarah A. Underwood ............

695
YANKEE VISITOR IN THE SOUTH, IMPRESSIONS OF A.........................Charles H. Levermore, Ph.D..................
YOSEMITE, A DAY IN THE, WITH A KODAK ..

....Samuel Douglas Dodge..

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Illustrations: The Start; We Reach Grant's for Dinner; First View of the Yosemite Falls; Nevada Falls and the Cap of

Liberty; First Glimpse of Vernal Falls; Bridal Veil Falls; The Yosemite, from Inspiration Point.

609

67

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POETRY.

................Julie M. Lippman....
............... .Edwin R. Champlin.
........... ..Emily Shaw Forman.....

Edgar Allen Poe...

--Henry W. Longfellow.

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.H. P. Kimball...

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Henry R. Howland........
.Wilbur Larremore ....
Zitella Cocke...

Clinton Scollard .......

... Laura E. Richards..
................H. P. Kimball....................

William Winfred Campbell..

H. P. Kimball...
................... Sarah K. Bolton...........

Allen Eastman Cross ...
................Hamlin Garland...............

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628

ABOVE THE Town.
ANOTHER MAID......
BEACH-GRASS.......
BELLS, THE..

Illustrated by W. J. Leonard.
CHRISTMAS BELLS..

With Fac-simile of first three verses.
DEAD, THE.
DELIGHT ROSE.
DISILLUSIONED ..................
FATHERHOOD .............................
Fox-GLOVE BELLS..
GENERAL KUKUSHKA....
IMPOSSIBLE ..............
LAKE HURON, To. ............
LIMITATION.......
LONELINESS...
MORRIS, WILLIAM .........
Music LAND......

Illustration: Beethoven.
MY SHIPS..
My Two FRIENDS ....
NOON
NOVEMBER DAYS, IN.
OCTOBER CAMP-FIRE, BY THE..
ONLY. ............
PELHAM HILLS...................
PERFECT DAY, A.............
PROBLEM, THE..............
QUEBEC ....
RAPPAHANNOCK, ON THE...............
SEA-PICTURES..........
SLEEPY HOLLOW, 1890...
SONG ON THE BATTLE-FIELD, THE ...........
THEY TURNED HER OUT IN THE STREET....
TRINITY CHURCH, IN..

With Illustration.
VERESTCHAGIN ........
VINCIT QUI PATITUR.

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...David Buffum ...............
.................S. W. Foss ....................

.. John C. Miller ............
........... Jefferson B. Fletcher.........

C. G. Rogers......
Katharine Lee Bates...

..Alice Ward Bailey..
................ .Clinton Scollard..
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James Buckham.
.............. ..Samuel M. Baylis.............
.............. Charles H. Tiffany.....

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Richard E. Burton......
.............. ..T. H. Farnham ...........
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Jessie F. O'Donnell....
Fred De Vine .......
Walter Littlefield.

..Annie Eliot...
............W. P. Dole..

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THERE have been few Americans above, could not even in early years be

worthier of praise than Mark Hop- otherwise than a mystic. An ardent lover

kins. He built himself into the of nature, he instinctively turned from the mental fabric of two generations of men. study of nature to the joyful contemplaThey hold him in gentle, loving, and grate- tion of the God of nature. ful remembrance. He erected in their Mark Hopkins had an ancestry of which hearts the “ monument more enduring than a man might be justly proud. He was brass.” For many such it is unnecessary the grandson of a soldier, and bore his to speak of his exalted character, his ma- name. Colonel Mark Hopkins graduated jestic intellectual powers, and his command- at Yale in 1758, and, became the first ing personality. For the general public it lawyer in Great Barrington. But when is not unnecessary, and the word cannot the sound of war was heard, he sprang to be spoken too often. Many great eulo- arms, and died defending his country, at giums will yet be pronounced upon the White Plains, October 26, 1776. He was work and character of President Hopkins; but thirty-seven years of age when he fell. touching pictures will be drawn of his His wife, Electa Williams, was a half-sister person, his manner, and his inspiring com- of Ephraim Williams, who founded Wilpanionship; historians will dwell upon his liams College. The college was formally gentle but mighty influence in helping for- opened in 1793. An older brother of ward and upward the intellectual activities Colonel Hopkins was the famous theoloof the nineteenth century. Our aim is gian of Great Barrington, Dr. Samuel Hopsimply to scatter a few more powers upon kins, whose system of divinity is still held his grave before the enduring bronze of in honor in the theological world, and literature rises above it.

whose great purpose seems to have reapMark Hopkins was born in the town of peared in his great-nephew. The father Stockbridge, on February 4, 1802, and died of Mark Hopkins, Archibald Hopkins, at Williamstown on the 17th of June, 1887. was a farmer in Stockbridge, — we may Like a shock of corn fully ripe he came to be sure one of the sterling kind. He the end, and met death as the tired child lived to see his son at the head of meets and embraces sleep. God gave him Williams College, and died in January, his birth and appointed him to live in the 1839, at the age of seventy-three. His midst of some of the finest scenery of our wife was Mary Curtis of Stockbridge, a land. Stockbridge nestles between the woman of “uncommon strength and exmountains, and the little boy looked up cellence of character.” When in her youth reverently and heard the hills calling each she attended the first commencement of other to praise and worship. Do we won the college, in 1795, she little realized that der that this mountain farmer boy in after half a century later a son of hers would be years should exclaim : “I, too, am a mys- its honored president. Mary Curtis bore tic”? So great and luminous a soul, with to Archibald Hopkins three sons, but no the mountains about him and the stars daughters. One of these sons gave prom

Copyright, 1890, by New England Magazine Company, Boston. All rights reserved.

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ise of becoming a noted artist, but died too In his address delivered a year after early for the realization of the promise. The Dr. Hopkins's death, his life-long friend, other two, Albert and Mark, were long and the venerable and revered jurist, David intimately related to Williams College, and Dudley Field, recalls the days of their its success was largely due to their self-sac- common boyhood. Through his reminisrificing, enthusiastic, and unwearied labors. cent eyes we see the three friends — young Professor Albert Hopkins was a worthy co- Field, and Morgan (later the distinguished laborer of his older and greater brother. Oberlin professor), and Mark Hopkins —

We may be sure that such parents would students together at Stockbridge. The look well to the education of their sons. latter was at this time (1819) a lad of The farmer saw in his oldest boy the prom- seventeen years, and certainly they were ise of greater things than a quiet farmer's all, as Mr. Field phrases it, “lovers of life would satisfy. He saw the boy devel- knowledge and untiring in its pursuit." oping a strong, healthy body, in the pure Besides studying here, he spent some time mountain air. But he was developing at Clinton, New York, and at Lenox Acadsomething else. A great thirst for knowl- emy. In the fall of 1821 he entered Wiledge dominated him. The boy who as a liams as a sophomore, and three years later man was to lead hundreds of young men graduated, the valedictorian of his class. into the higher and broader realms of This was under the presidency of Dr. Griffin. thought was already beginning to feel his The question of a profession being now growing powers, and to long for entrance before the young valedictorian, he began into those realms himself.

to think seriously of a medical career.

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