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With this view he attended medical lec- leaders of thought in this century were tures in Pittsfield during the ensuing year, then young men with him, or even boys. while teaching a part of the time in his Emerson was one year younger; Longfelnative town. The two following years, low, five; Holmes, Lincoln, Winthrop, 1825-27, we find him a tutor in Williams Tennyson, and Gladstone, seven ; Wendell College, and at the close of this period de- Phillips and Charles Sumner, nine; Henry livering a master's oration on Mystery, Ward Beecher, eleven. The great works which must have marked an epoch in his in our American literature were almost all career. It was a clear, scholarly, and, for unwritten in the year 1833 ; the movement so young a man, remarkable oration for the abolition of slavery had hardly

At the time of his tutorship, in the year begun. Professor Hopkins went on quietly 1826, he united with the church in Stock- but with earnest enthusiasm in his work. bridge. In 1827 he resumed his medical During this year, 1833, he published A studies, partly at Pittsfield and partly in Review of the Argument from Nature for New York City, and two years later re- the Divine Existence. In 1834 he pubceived his degree of M.D. at Pittsfield. lished an address on Human Happiness, He was now a full-fledged doctor, and the which was followed the next year by an question naturally arose, where to begin oration on Originality. The man was now practice. He seems to have been in no fitted for the graver duties and weightier haste to settle this important matter. In responsibilities about to be placed upon the summer of 1830 he had about decided him. to go to New York to practice, when, most Dr. Griffin having resigned the presiunexpectedly to himself, he was elected to dency of the college at commencement in fill the professorship of rhetoric and moral the summer of 1836, it did not take the philosophy in Williams College, just made trustees long to decide upon the proper vacant by the death of Professor William man to succeed him. They proceeded A. Porter. The young tutor who had given with great unanimity to elect Professor so keen and striking an analysis of Mys- Hopkins to the presidency of the college tery three years before had not been for- and to the professorship of moral and ingotten.

tellectual philosophy. On the fifteenth day The mind of the young professor now of September, 1836, he was formally inturned into a wholly different channel. ducted into the office, and also ordained Medicine gave place to the consideration to the pastorate of the college church. His of philosophical and spiritual themes. He inaugural address was a calm, broad, and here found a fitting field for his noblest powerful production. “I enter upon the powers. As his mind dwelt upon these duties of the office to which I am called," themes, and as he discussed them in the he said in closing, “ with no excitement classroom and in private, his religious life of novelty, with no accession of influence deepened. He was led to think seriously to the college from abroad, and with no of using his gifts as a preacher. We find expectation of pleasing everybody. I have him appearing before the Berkshire Asso- . no ambition to build up here what would ciation, at Dalton, in May, 1833, and re- be called a great institution; the wants of ceiving their approbation to preach. Sel- the country do not require it. But I do dom was a young licentiate so thoroughly desire and shall labor that this may be a equipped for the presentation of the gospel safe college ; that its reputation may be of Christ. On the preceding Christmas sustained and raised still higher; that the day, December 25, 1832, he had married plan of institution I have indicated may Mary Hubbell of Williamstown. For more be carried out more fully; that here there than half a century they walked together may be health and cheerful study and in happiness, and to her his last words on kind feelings and pure morals ; and that earth were spoken.

in the memory of future students college The years now passed pleasantly. He life may be made a still more verdant spot. was full of physical and intellectual vigor. ... This college has for a long time been His home and college surroundings were regarded, and not without reason, with inpleasant; his mental powers were expand- terest and affection by the churches. Of ing, and all saw in him one of the coming its whole number of graduates as many as great men. Those who have been the one-third have devoted themselves to the Christian ministry, and recently a larger pointed the way to the heights, but walked proportion. It is on this ground that that way himself. American missions had their origin. It President Hopkins was a very busy man. was here that Mills and Hall prayed, and During the first years of his administration their mantle has so descended on the insti- there was a great deal to be done. He tution that now we can hardly turn our instructed the seniors in anatomy, - for eyes to a missionary station where one or this his medical training had specially fitted more of its sons are not to be found.” He him, — in rhetoric, ethics, and metaphysics. desired that his students should find study He preached a large part of the time on “nerved to its highest efforts by Christian Sunday. He prepared and delivered imbenevolence, and young men shall grow portant public addresses. During the year up at the same time into the light of 1837, for example, he delivered an address science and the beauty of holiness." at Andover, a lecture on State and Mor

He was the fourth president of Williams als, and a sermon in commemoration of College. Dr. Fitch, the first incumbent, Dr. Griffin, all of which were published. had assumed the position in 1793. Dur- But there was much else to be done, for ing his administration, which lasted twenty- the college was poor and its existence a two years, 460 young men were graduated. struggle. He had to devote no little time, Dr. Moore filled the position for the next thought, and energy to obtain the necessary six years, in which time only 90 were funds both for running expenses and engraduated. The third president, Dr. Grif- dowments, and for the enlarging of the fin, entered upon the duties of the posi- college's field of work by the erection of tion in 1821, the same year that Mark new buildings and the securing of new Hopkins entered Williams as a sophomore, apparatus. His position was no sinecure. and continued in it fifteen years, during Mark Hopkins did not wish to occupy any which period 311 names were added to sinecure position. the list of graduates. The new president Honors began to flow in upon him. found larger classes ; for of those then in Dartmouth honored itself by bestowing the college, in were added to the list of degree of Doctor of Divinity upon him in graduates, and 896 in the first twenty-three 1837; and Harvard College did the same years of his administration. During all in 1841. In 1857 he was made a Doctor these years the percentage of those enter- of Laws by the Board of Regents of New ing the ministry (one-third) was still main York. The same year (1857) he was tained.

elected to the presidency of the American The new president was very popular Board of Commissioners for Foreign Miswith the students. They realized the sions, at its annual meeting at Providence, strength of his noble manhood and his Rhode Island, a position which he filled deep interest in their welfare. They felt with consummate ability for thirty years. that he stood near to them, and yet, be- He proved himself a worthy successor to cause of his exalted character and enthu- the Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen; and siasm in duty, no one was likely to be over- his mantle has fallen on an admirable sucfamiliar with him. There was that about cessor in the person of Dr. Storrs. In him which placed a proper barrier and these thirty years of his connection with warned the student that the kindly in the American Board, hundreds of thoustructor was not to be trified with. That sands of people looked on his imposing divinity which hedged him about shielded presence, and listened to his clear, comprehim from all disrespect and caused every hensive, luminous addresses. student to honor, to love, and in a measure President Hopkins was an exceptionally to fear him. He had a high ideal before tall man, and rather thin, but he was wiry his own mind, and he placed high ideals and quick in motion. His shoulders were before theirs. But, best of all, they saw broad, but slightly bent, and his forehead him before their very eyes going on from ample, rising above a pair of mild hazel strength to strength, from height to height. eyes. He spoke with reasonable deliberaAnd this living example served as a con- tion, in clear, full tones, which commanded stant and mighty incentive to noble exer- instant respect; every one felt at once that tion. The Williams College man must be some word of wisdom which he would not a hard student ; for his president not only willingly lose was about to fall from those eloquent lips. He did not gesticulate much; dress before the American Educational it was unnecessary to the expression of his Society, and the next year his Election thought. He did not grow excited. Each Sermon, delivered in May. In 1840 three thought carried its own weight. Gently addresses were published: one before the but powerfully his own mind was working, American Bible Society, another at South and well he knew it would leave an indelible Hadley to the students of Mount Holyoke impression upon the mind of each hearer. Seminary, and the third at Pittsfield. In

In raising funds for Williams College Dr. the decade 1841-50, he published three Hopkins did not resort to such measures addresses : at Williston Seminary, at the as the trustees of the Free School, out of semi-centennial of Williams College, and which it grew, had done half a century a temperance address; also nine sermons, earlier. According to the records, that including one before the American Board body voted on August 19, 1788, to build a at Brooklyn, in 1845, another at Plymouth, brick house for school purposes, seventy- December 22, 1846, and a baccalaureate two by forty feet, and three stories high; on Faith, Philosophy, and Reason. In and in order to secure the necessary funds 1846 appeared the Lowell Institute Lectherefor, they petitioned the General Court tures on the Evidences of Christianity, a to grant them the privilege of a lottery. book which met with the warmest recepTheir request was granted, and the lottery tion. The year following, a book made up netted them, not the full £1200 expected, of twenty-two discourses and addresses of but f1037 18s. 2d. Times had changed his was published under the title, Miscellain the fifty years. For a time the longed- neous Essays and Discourses. These exfor funds came in very slowly, and it was cellent volumes increased his reputation especially vexatious to the new president, for the country over. he had plans of enlargement which called From 1851 to 1859 he preached seven for a large outlay of money. At one time baccalaureate sermons, which were pubhe speaks of this, not complainingly, but in lished under these titles : Strength and sorrow. Being so far away from Boston, Beauty, Receiving and Giving, Perfect it was hard to interest her citizens deeply Love, Self-Denial, Higher and Lower in the college among the distant hills. We Good, Eagles' Wings, The Manifoldness must remember that in those days Williams of Man; also a sermon on Amos LawCollege was as far away from Boston com- rence (1853), on Science and Religion (Alparatively as Chicago is to-day. But it was bany, New York, 1856), on The Promise not long before the fame of President Hop- to Abraham (Bangor, Maine, 1857), on kins attracted both many niore students Religious Teaching and Worship. This and influential friends who were ready to last discourse was preached at the dedicacontribute liberally to its support. One tion of the college chapel in 1859. To of the foremost of these was Amos Law: these we must add four addresses, delivered rence, who gave nearly forty thousand dol- before the Williams College Society, Boslars to Williams College at different times. ton (1852); the Congregational Library

Year by year, under President Hopkins's Association (1855); at a Missionary Jubiquiet, thoughtful, earnest leadership, the lee (1856); and at Havana, New York college went steadily forward. As Mr. (1858). He also delivered an oration on Field well says : “He was a prince among The Central Principle, New York, Decemteachers. He made his pupils think and ber 22, 1853 ; published an article in the ask questions, as well as listen.” He could American Theological Review for 1859, be both kind and firm. The number of on “The Atonement as related to Sin and students rose to about two hundred. In- to a Divine Law-Giver." Since then a spired by his example, the students showed great number of his sermons, addresses, courage, energy, and power to think and and more extended writings have been act for themselves ; for he continually “al- given to the public. Many of them were lured to brighter worlds and led the way.” addresses at commencements, courses of He was simple and direct in his manner lectures at other colleges, and addresses of thinking, and he taught his pupils to hate at the annual meetings of the American all equivocation and all sham.

Board. All these years he was publishing more A mong his more extended works the or less. Thus, in 1838, appeared his ad- most important is The Law of Love and

Christian ministry, and recently a larger pointed the way to the heights, but walked proportion. It is on this ground that that way himself. American missions had their origin. It President Hopkins was a very busy man. was here that Mills and Hall prayed, and During the first years of his administration their mantle has so descended on the insti- there was a great deal to be done. He tution that now we can hardly turn our instructed the seniors in anatomy, - for eyes to a missionary station where one or this his medical training had specially fitted more of its sons are not to be found.” He him, — in rhetoric, ethics, and metaphysics. desired that his students should find study He preached a large part of the time on “ nerved to its highest efforts by Christian Sunday. He prepared and delivered imbenevolence, and young men shall grow portant public addresses. During the year . up at the same time into the light of 1837, for example, he delivered an address science and the beauty of holiness.” at Andover, a lecture on State and Mor

He was the fourth president of Williams als, and a sermon in commemoration of College. Dr. Fitch, the first incumbent, Dr. Griffin, all of which were published. had assumed the position in 1793. Dur. But there was much else to be done, for ing his administration, which lasted twenty- the college was poor and its existence a two years, 460 young men were graduated. struggle. He had to devote no little time, Dr. Moore filled the position for the next thought, and energy to obtain the necessary six years, in which time only 90 were funds both for running expenses and engraduated. The third president, Dr. Grif- dowments, and for the enlarging of the fin, entered upon the duties of the posi- college's field of work by the erection of tion in 1821, the same year that Mark new buildings and the securing of new Hopkins entered Williams as a sophomore, apparatus. His position was no sinecure. and continued in it fifteen years, during Mark Hopkins did not wish to occupy any which period 311 names were added to sinecure position. the list of graduates. The new president Honors began to flow in upon him. found larger classes; for of those then in Dartmouth honored itself by bestowing the college, III were added to the list of degree of Doctor of Divinity upon him in graduates, and 896 in the first twenty-three 1837; and Harvard College did the same years of his administration. During all in 1841. In 1857 he was made a Doctor these years the percentage of those enter- of Laws by the Board of Regents of New ing the ministry (one-third) was still main- York. The same year (1857) he was tained.

elected to the presidency of the American The new president was very popular Board of Commissioners for Foreign Miswith the students. They realized the sions, at its annual meeting at Providence, strength of his noble manhood and his Rhode Island, a position which he filled deep interest in their welfare. They felt with consummate ability for thirty years. that he stood near to them, and yet, be- He proved himself a worthy successor to cause of his exalted character and enthu- the Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen; and siasm in duty, no one was likely to be over- his mantle has fallen on an admirable sucfamiliar with him. There was that about cessor in the person of Dr. Storrs. In him which placed a proper barrier and these thirty years of his connection with warned the student that the kindly in the American Board, hundreds of thoustructor was not to be trifled with. That sands of people looked on his imposing divinity which hedged him about shielded presence, and listened to his clear, comprehim from all disrespect and caused every hensive, luminous addresses. student to honor, to love, and in a measure President Hopkins was an exceptionally to fear him. He had a high ideal before tall man, and rather thin, but he was wiry his own mind, and he placed high ideals and quick in motion. His shoulders were before theirs. But, best of all, they saw broad, but slightly bent, and his forehead him before their very eyes going on from ample, rising above a pair of mild hazel strength to strength, from height to height. eyes. He spoke with reasonable deliberaAnd this living example served as a con- tion, in clear, full tones, which commanded stant and mighty incentive to noble exer- instant respect; every one felt at once that tion. The Williams College man must be some word of wisdom which he would not a hard student; for his president not only willingly lose was about to fall from those eloquent lips. He did not gesticulate much; dress before the American Educational it was unnecessary to the expression of his Society, and the next year his Election thought. He did not grow excited. Each Sermon, delivered in May. In 1840 three thought carried its own weight. Gently addresses were published : one before the but powerfully his own mind was working, American Bible Society, another at South and well he knew it would leave an indelible Hadley to the students of Mount Holyoke impression upon the mind of each hearer. Seminary, and the third at Pittsfield. In

In raising funds for Williams College Dr. the decade 1841-50, he published three Hopkins did not resort to such measures addresses : at Williston Seminary, at the as the trustees of the Free School, out of semi-centennial of Williams College, and which it grew, had done half a century a temperance address; also nine sermons, earlier. According to the records, that including one before the American Board body voted on August 19, 1788, to build a at Brooklyn, in 1845, another at Plymouth, brick house for school purposes, seventy- December 22, 1846, and a baccalaureate two by forty feet, and three stories high; on Faith, Philosophy, and Reason. In and in order to secure the necessary funds 1846 appeared the Lowell Institute Lectherefor, they petitioned the General Court tures on the Evidences of Christianity, a to grant them the privilege of a lottery. book which met with the warmest recepTheir request was granted, and the lottery tion. The year following, a book made up netted them, not the full £1200 expected, of twenty-two discourses and addresses of but £1037 18s. 2d. Times had changed his was published under the title, Miscellain the fifty years. For a time the longed- neous Essays and Discourses. These exfor funds came in very slowly, and it was cellent volumes increased his reputation especially vexatious to the new president, for the country over. he had plans of enlargement which called From 1851 to 1859 he preached seven for a large outlay of money. At one time baccalaureate sermons, which were pubhe speaks of this, not complainingly, but in lished under these titles : Strength and sorrow. Being so far away from Boston, Beauty, Receiving and Giving, Perfect it was hard to interest her citizens deeply Love, Self-Denial, Higher and Lower in the college among the distant hills. We Good, Eagles' Wings, The Manifoldness must remember that in those days Williams of Man; also a sermon on Amos LawCollege was as far away from Boston com- rence (1853), on Science and Religion (Alparatively as Chicago is to-day. But it was bany, New York, 1856), on The Promise not long before the fame of President Hop- to Abraham (Bangor, Maine, 1857), on kins attracted both many more students Religious Teaching and Worship. This and influential friends who were ready to last discourse was preached at the dedicacontribute liberally to its support. One tion of the college chapel in 1859. To of the foremost of these was Amos Law- these we must add four addresses, delivered rence, who gave nearly forty thousand dol- before the Williams College Society, Boslars to Williams College at different times. ton (1852); the Congregational Library

Year by year, under President Hopkins's Association (1855); at a Missionary Jubiquiet, thoughtful, earnest leadership, the lee (1856); and at Havana, New York college went steadily forward. As Mr. (1858). He also delivered an oration on Field well says : “He was a prince among The Central Principle, New York, Decemteachers. He made his pupils think and ber 22, 1853 ; published an article in the ask questions, as well as listen.” He could American Theological Review for 1859, be both kind and firm. The number of on “ The Atonement as related to Sin and students rose to about two hundred. In to a Divine Law-Giver." Since then a spired by his example, the students showed great number of his sermons, addresses, courage, energy, and power to think and and more extended writings have been act for themselves; for he continually “al- given to the public. Many of them were lured to brighter worlds and led the way.” addresses at commencements, courses of He was simple and direct in his manner lectures at other colleges, and addresses of thinking, and he taught his pupils to hate at the annual meetings of the American all equivocation and all sham.

Board. All these years he was publishing more Among his more extended works the or less. Thus, in 1838, appeared his ad- most important is The Law of Love and

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