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PARAGRAPH 237–MACARONI. List of macaroni and noodle factories out of business since July 1, 1905Continued.

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STATEMENT BY AMERICAN MACARONI CO., CAMDEN, N. J.

CAMDEN, N. J.,.January 13, 1913. Hon. WILLIAM J. BROWNING,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR SIR: We are advised that on Monday, January 20, the Ways and Meang Committee will hold a hearing on Schedule G, agricultural products and provisions. In all probability there will be an attempt to reduce the tariff macaroni.

Any reduction in the present tariff means the closing of the macaroni factories which are now in operation and the consequent loss of a large part of the many millions of dollars now invested in manufacturing macaroni, and the absolute crippling of all new plants now under construction.

The United States Government introduced into this country at a vast expense the durum wheat, which is used almost entirely by manufacturers of macaroni or similar products. With the reduced tariff on macaroni or kindred products the American consumption of durum flour is gone.

We urge you to oppose any downward change in tariff on macaroni products as the percentage of profit is now so small that a downward revision means the flooding of our markets with foreign-made goods at a price which will render any competition impossible. Very respectfully, yours,

AMERICAN MACARONI Co.,

B. F. MILLER, Secretary.
SUNDRY STATEMENTS CONCERNING MACARONI.

GUANO & RAGGIO,

Philadelphia, January 13, 1913. Hon. WM. REYBURN,

United States Congress, Washington, D. C. Dear Sir: We are informed that actually the fate of the macaroni industry will be decided next Monday (January 20), with the probable tariff cut-off to appease the popular cry of “high cost of living."

Às manufacturers we protest strongly against any change, as it would in no way benefit the consumer, being that the wholesalers and retailers are the ones reaping the profits of sometimes 400 per cent.

The domestic article is placed on the market at as low a margin of profit as possible, and “no tariff” would result in flooding the American market with the foreign product, which would not only injure the manufacturers, but also all lines used in our trade.

Attached herewith hand you status of our business and also a comparison of the cost and hours of labor, here and abroad.

PARAGRAPH 237-MACARONI. There are hundreds of macaroni factories in the State of Pennsylvania and thousands in the United States, so we sincerely trust you will see how needy is your cooperation. Advancing thanks, we are, respectfully, yours,

GUANO & Raggio.

STATUS OF OUR FIRM. Capital.

$70,000 Machinery (included in capital).

9,000 Flour used annually.. Wooden boxes used annually.

100,000

8, 500 Papers used annually.

2,000 Twines used annually

150 Printings used annually.

1, 200 Coal used annually.

800 Machinery repairs annually...

1, 200 Strawboard cartons used annually.

2,500 Freights, sundries, annually.

1, 800 Wages and salaries, annually.

16,000

COMPARISON OF cosT AND HOURS OF LABOR.

Foreign labor laws admit children to work from ages of 10 to 16, whereas under our laws they must be over 16.

The foreign daily hours are 12 and Sunday forenoon, while our day's work averages 10 hours.

American skilled labor is paid from $1.75 to $2.50 per day;
Foreign skilled labor is paid from 40 cents to 60 cents per day.
Foreign common labor is paid from 20 cents to 40 cents per day
American common labor is paid from $1.25 to $1.75 per day.
Foreign child labor is paid from 10 cents to 20 cents per day.
American child labor-none allowed.

GUANO & RAGGIO.

THE CONTINENTAL CEREAL Co.,

Leavenworth, Kans., January 11, 1913. Hon. D. R. ANTHONY, Jr.,

Washington, D. C. My Dear MR. ANTHONY: We understand that the Ways and Means Committee of the House of Representatives are holding hearings daily, preliminary to preparing a bill to present to the special session of Congress which President Wilson will call to revise the tariff. Monday, January 20, is set for hearings on Schedule G, agricultural products and provisions, and you know the tendency will be to cut tariffs in this schedule to satisfy the popular cry against the "high cost of living." We want you to protest against a change in tariff on macaroni, which is now 14 cents per pound. The fact that the United States Government has spent vast sums of money in introducing macaroni wheat into this country and that the increased acreage is being sown every year in the arid regions of the West with this wheat, which is used almost absolutely in the manufacture of macaroni, should be a strong argument for you to use with the Ways and Means Committee against making it possible for the foreign products to be admitted upon any more favorable terms than those it now enjoys. °Remember that the tariff now is not sufficient to equalize the cost of production at home and that the American product is placed upon the market at as low a margin of profit as is possible, and that the result of “no tariff” or with the reduction of the tariff would be to flood the American market with the foreign product at the expense of the American manufacturer without in any way reducing the price to the consumer, besides making the cost to the Government to introduce durum wheat an enormous waste of money. We are placing in the hands of jobbers our manufactured macaroni at 5 cents per pound in packages and 4 cents per pound in bulk. This goes to the consumer at the rate of 3 pounds for a quarter for the package goods and 4 pounds for a quarter for the bulk goods. You will note at a glance that the above prices to the consumer is a very cheap article of food, and as stated above if there is any further reduction on account of change of tariff it would almost close every macaroni manufactory in this country.

Hoping that you will lend your aid to assist us, with the many other macaroni manufacturers, to keep in existence, we are, Yours, very truly,

CONTINENTAL CEREAL Co.
E. E. BREWSTER.

PARAGRAPH 237–MACARONI.

San FRANCISCO, CAL., January 17, 1918. Hon. Julius Kaun,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. The undersigned manufacturers here of alimentary paste (macaroni, spaghetti, noodles, etc.) earnestly desire yours and your colleagues hearty cooperation and efforts help defeat any cut present tariff Schedule G. Agricultural products and provisions on January 20, wherein same affects our product. Irreparable injury result our industry to say nothing useless waste vast sums money expended by our Government to introduce suitable wheat into this country for paste manufacture, also retarding development great tracts arid land in West sown almost exclusively wheat suitable manufacture paste. Reduction tariff effectually kill growing industry yet in infancy that to-day constitutes one of solutions to high cost of living, taking place meat to millions people in this country. Foreign product now enjoying most favorable terms; no necessity further favorable terms expense ourselves. Tariff even now not sufficient equalize cost of production here and abroad even taking into consideration fact great quantities wheat exported Europe eventually returning as paste. This part of same wheat mentioned above as having been introduced by our Government at great expense. Million boxes imported article now sold this country, even though our product placed on market at as low margin profit as possible. No tariff or reduction same result flooding our market with foreign product expense American manufacturer.

Vesuvio Paste Co.; Peidmont & Neapolitan Paste Co., San Francisco; Cali

fornia Paste Co.; L. R. Podesta (Inc.); H. J. Sosuo & Bro.; Roma
Macaroni Factory; Columbus Paste Co.; Star Macaroni Factory; Genoa
Macaronia Factory; Golden Gate Macaroni Factory; New Century
Macaroni Factory; Pompeii Macaroni Factory; Gragnano Macaroni
Co.; Green Valley Macaroni Co.; Phoenix Macaroni Factory; Italian-
American Macaroni Co.; Semolino Food Co.; Piedmont & Neapolitan

Paste Co.; Oakland Westberkley Paste Co. The undersigned millers here also append their signatures and bespeak your best efforts:

Fisher Flouring Mills Co.; Sperry Flour Co.; Centennial Mill Co.; Ham

mond Milling Co.; Albers Bros. Milling Co.; Yosemite Flour Mills; Northern Flour Co.; C. A. Hutton Flour Co.

ABRUZZI MACARONI FACTORY,

Philadelphia, Pa., January 14, 1913. Hon. WILLIAM REYBURN,

United States Congress. Dear Sir: Information to the effect was received that Monday next will actually decide the fate of the American macaroni industry, with the probable "cut-off” in the tariff to satisfy the popular cry of “High cost of living."

As manufacturers we strongly protest against any change being made as same would not benefit the consumer in any way, and the ones who are to-day reaping as high as 400 per cent profits would do so under changed circumstances as well.

The domestic article is now placed on the market at as low as possible margin of profit and “no tariff” would be the means of flooding the home markets with the foreign product and not only bring injury to the manufacturers but also to all others doing business with us and of which the details of our branch calls for many.

Herewith attached beg to hand you a comparison of the cost and the hours of the foreign markets and also a statement of our business, and ask you to bear in mind that there are hundreds of such factories in the State of Pennsylvania and thousands in the United States; thus it is that we solicit your earnest cooperation. Trusting you will oblige one and all in this move, while advancing thanks, We remain,

ANTONIO RICCHEZZA,
D. CINI,

Abruzzi Macaroni Factory.

PARAGRAPH 239--OAT HULLS.

COMPARISON OF COST AND HOURS OF LABOR.

Foreign labor laws admit children to work from ages of 10 to 16, whereas, under our laws, they must be over 16.

The foreign daily hours are 12 and Sunday forenoon, while our day's work averages 10 hours.

Foreign skilled labor is paid from 40 to 60 cents per day against $1.75 to $2.50 paid to the American skilled labor.

Common foreign labor is paid from 20 to 40 cents per day, while we pay from $1.25
to $1.75.
Children are paid from 10 to 20 cents per day, while we can not employ them.

ANTONIO RICCHEZZA,
D. CINI,

Abruzzi Macaroni Factory.

SEATTLE, Wash., January 18, 1913. Hon. F. E. HUMPHREY,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C.: In Schedule M hearing on Monday there will be a tendency to remove the present duty of 14 cents per pound on macaroni, the present tariff is not sufficient to equalize the cost of production here and abroad the American product is now placed upon the market at as low a margin of profit that is possible, and that the result of no tariff or a reduction of the tariff would be to flood the American market with the foreign product at the expense of the American manufacturer, besides making the cost to the Government to introduce durum wheat an enormous waste of money. Will appreciate your support in maintaining present duty.

A. F. CHIGLIONE & Sons.

SEATTLE, Wash., January 18, 1913. Hon. W. E. HUMPHREY,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C.: Understand contemplate taking duty off of macaroni and believe should this be done it would work a great hardship on macaroni and milling industry in this country, bringing them in contact with the cheap labor of Italy. Anything you do to prevent same will be appreciated.

THE CHAS. H. LILLY Co. PARAGRAPH 238.

Oats, fifteen cents per bushel. PARAGRAPH 239.

Oatmeal and rolled oats, one cent per pound; oat hulls, ten cents per hundred pounds.

OAT HULLS.

IMPORTS FROM CANADA.

JANUARY 11, 1913. Hon. Isaac R. SHERWOOD,

House of Representatives, Washington, D. C. DEAR GENERAL: In the matter of revising the tariff, there is just one point in which we are very much interested, and that is in reference to the duty on oat hulls coming into this country from Canada, which, under the present tariff, is taxed at the rate of $2 per ton.

Oat hulls are the offal of the oatmeal mills, and are made up of the hulls and fine stuff, and are used largely by feed manufacturers, as a filler or roughener, in some grades of feed. It is absolutely necessary to have them, in order to compete with some of the large cereal concerns in this country, notably the Quaker Oats Co., who practically control the oatmeal business of the country, but who refuse to sell this product to other manufacturers; for this reason, outside of a few small independent mills, it is necessary to purchase this material in Canada.

PARAGRAPH 240-RICE.

Under the Wilson bill, oat hulls were admitted free of duty, but when the tariff was again revised, this $2 duty was put on and remains there yet. We would earnestly urge your attention to this matter, with a view of having them include it in the free list, and if you desire any further information concerning it we will be very glad to furnish it. With best regards to you personally, we remain, Yours, very truly,

W. H. HASKELL & Co.

PARAGRAPH 240.

Rice, cleaned, two cents per pound; uncleaned rice, or rice free of the outer hull and still having the inner cuticle on, one and one-fourth cents per pound; rice flour and rice meal, and rice broken which will pass through a number twelve wire sieve of a kind prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, onefourth of one cent per pound; paddy, or rice having the outer hull on, threefourths of one cent per pound.

RICE.

STATEMENT OF HON. R. F. BROUSSARD, OF LOUISIANA.

Mr. BROUSSARD. Mr. Chairman, I have no desire to take up the time of the committee. The reservation of time I made was in behalf of the individual members of the Southern Rice Growers' Association, an association of farmers consisting of a membership of 1,525 in Louisiana, 1,020 in Texas, and 404 in Arkansas.

Since I made the reservation the association has, at a meeting at Beaumont, Tex., appointed a committee, consisting of S. Locke Breaux, chairman, New Orleans, La.; S. Arthur Knapp, Lake Charles, La.; and Fred. D. Gibson, Stuttgart, Ark., to present the matter to your committee.

The president of the association, Mr. W. B. Dunlap, of Beaumont, Tex., is here, and I would like for him to be heard briefly in my time, and 'then Mr. Breaux, on behalf of the committee, will present the other part of the hearing, after which they will submit the matter.

The CHAIRMAN. Mr. Dunlap will be heard.

TESTIMONY OF W. B. DUNLAP, PRESIDENT OF THE SOUTHERN

RICE GROWERS' ASSOCIATION, BEAUMONT, TEX.

The witness was duly sworn by the chairman.

Mr. DUNLAP. Gentleman, I come before you this morning representing the producers, irrigators, and millers of rice of the States of Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas; I come before you as the president of the rice growers' association, an association composed of about 3,000 members, growers of rice in the States of Louisiana, Texas, and 'Arkansas, and probably a few in Mississippi. This association was organized about three years ago for the purpose of bettering conditions in connection with rice growing.

Mr. LONGWORTH. Will you not talk a little louder, please? I am anxious to hear you.

Mr. DUNLAP. The growers of rice have so far found it an unprofitable proposition. At a directors' meeting held at Beaumont 30 or 40 days ago I was authorized to select a committee to get up the necessary data and information to be presented to you at this hearing.

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