Discourse Occasioned by the Death of Convers Francis, D. D.: Delivered Before the First Congregational Society, Watertown, April 19, 1863

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Priv. print., 1863 - 78 páginas

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Página 11 - And not a voice was idle ; with the din Smitten, the precipices rang aloud ; The leafless trees and every icy crag Tinkled like iron ; while far distant hills Into the tumult sent an alien sound Of melancholy not unnoticed, while the stars Eastward were sparkling clear, and in the west The orange sky of evening died away.
Página 11 - Tinkled like iron; while far distant hills Into the tumult sent an alien sound Of melancholy not unnoticed, while the stars Eastward were sparkling clear, and in the west The orange sky of evening died away. Not seldom from the uproar I retired Into a silent bay, or sportively Glanced sideway, leaving the tumultuous throng, To cut across the reflex of a star That fled, and flying still before me, gleamed Upon the glassy plain...
Página 26 - Touch us gently, Time ! Let us glide adown thy stream Gently, — as we sometimes glide Through a quiet dream ! Humble voyagers are We, Husband, wife, and children three — (One is lost, — an angel, fled To the azure overhead ! ) Touch us gently, Time! We've not proud nor soaring wings : Our ambition, our content Lies in simple things. Humble voyagers are We, O'er Life's dim unsounded sea, Seeking only some calm clime : — Touch us gently, gentle Time ! EBENEZER ELLIOTT.
Página 74 - When it is present, men take example at it; and when it is gone, they desire it: it weareth a crown, and triumpheth for ever, having gotten the victory, striving for undefiled rewards.
Página 74 - The memorial of virtue is immortal; Because it is known with God and with men. When it is present, mankind take example of it; And when it is gone they desire it. It weareth a crown and triumpheth forever, Having gotten the victory, striving for undefiled rewards.
Página 31 - When we were alone, he talked of his Discourse at the Divinity School, and of the obloquy it had brought upon him: he is perfectly quiet amidst the storm; to my objections and remarks he gave the most candid replies, though we could not agree...
Página 31 - ... in love for man and goodness, I have never met. Mr. Emerson is not one whose vocation it is to state processes of argument ; he is a seer who reports in sweet and significant words what he sees. He looks into the infinite of truth, and records what there passes before his vision. If you see it as he does, you will recognize him for a gifted teacher ; if not, there is little or nothing to be said about it.
Página 31 - ... processes of argument; he is a seer who reports in sweet and significant words what he sees; he looks into the infinite of truth, and records what there passes before his vision: if you see it as he does, you will...
Página 28 - I have long seen that the Unitarians must break into two schools, — the Old one, or English school, belonging to the sensual and empiric philosophy, — and the New one, or the German school (perhaps it may be called), belonging to the spiritual philosophy.
Página 59 - Wem Zeit ist wie Ewigkeit Und Ewigkeit wie Zeit, Der ist befreit Von allem Streit.

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