The Youth and Manhood of Cyril Thornton, Volumen3

Portada
William Blackwood, 1829
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 218 - O Woman ! in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light quivering aspen made, When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou ! — Scarce were the piteous accents said, When, with the Baron's casque, the maid To the nigh streamlet ran.
Página 23 - All school-days' friendship, childhood innocence? We, Hermia, like two artificial gods, Have with our needles created both one flower, Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion, Both warbling of one song, both in one key; As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds, Had been incorporate.
Página 337 - Let his word be a lamp unto your feet and a light unto your path ; may He be your refuge and your strength.
Página 208 - Did I but purpose to embark with thee On the smooth surface of a summer's sea ; While gentle zephyrs play in prosperous gales, And fortune's favour fills the swelling sails ; But would forsake the ship, and make the shore, When the winds whistle, and the tempests roar...
Página 339 - But doth not the appetite alter? A man loves the meat in his youth, that he cannot endure in his age: Shall quips, and sentences, and these paper bullets of the brain, awe a man from the career of his humour? No: The world must be peopled. When I said, I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.— Here comes Beatrice : By this day, she's a fair lady : I do spy some marks of love in her.
Página 301 - DUKE'S PALACE. [Enter DUKE, CURIO, LORDS; MUSICIANS attending.] DUKE. If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it; that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken and so die.— That strain again;— it had a dying fall; O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south, That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing and giving odour.— Enough; no more; 'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.
Página 23 - Have with our needles created both one flower, Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion, Both warbling of one song, both in one key ; As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds, Had been incorporate. So we grew together, Like to a double cherry, seeming parted, But yet a union in partition, Two lovely berries moulded on one stem : So, with two seeming bodies, but one heart ; Two of the first, like coats in heraldry, Due but to one, and crowned with one crest.
Página 55 - Up, up, fair Bride! and call Thy stars from out their several boxes ; take Thy rubies, pearls and diamonds, forth, and make Thyself a constellation of them all...
Página 229 - It is decreed: nor shall thy fate, O Rome, Resist my vow. Though hills were set on hills, And seas met seas to guard thee, I would through, Ay, plough up rocks...
Página 187 - ... from our prime; Love is a thing to which we soon consent, As soon refuse, but sooner far repent. Then what must women be, that are the cause That love hath life ? that lovers feel such laws ? They're like the winds upon Lapanthae's shore, That still are changing : O, then love no more ! A woman's love is like that Syrian flower, That buds, and spreads, and withers in an hour.

Información bibliográfica