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COLORADO COLLEGE.

INAUGURAL ADDRESS,

BY

E. P. TENNEY.

Nil desperandum Christo Duce.

COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO.:
REPUBLIC AND MOUNTAINEER PRINTING COMPANY.

COLORADO SPRINGS, JUNE I, 1882. Rev. E. P. Tenney, President of Colorado College :

Dear Sir:Permit the undersigned to express the earnest hope that your inaugural of yesterday may be given to the public through the press. We are sure that this must be the wish of all who heard it. Not only does the occasion which called it forth demand that it be put in permanent form, but its views of what should enter into our higher American education are so intelligent and elevated, and, withal, so admirably expressed that they must deeply interest all thoughtful minds. Especially the educators of our country, east and west, will be glad to see on what fair and strong foundations we of the Centennial State are purposing to build in this matter of so surprising moment.

Very truly we are yours,
Willis LORD,

GEO. T. LE BOUTILLIER.
T. C. KIRKWOOD,

IRVING HOWBERT,
CHARLES R. Bliss,

Geo. DE LA VERGNE,
F. L. MARTIN,

WINTHROP D. SHELDON,
James B. GREGG,

W. L. Slutz,
LEVI B. WILSON,

E. N. BARTLETT,
J. H. KERR,

R. C. BRISTOL.
R. T. Cross,

COLORADO SPRINGS, JUNE 2, 1882. To Willis Lord, L.L. D., Irving Houbert, Esq., Rev. Geo. T. Le Boutillier, Rev. R. C. Bristol, and others.

MY DEAR SIRS :- I cannot conceal from you my appreciation of the kind sentiments expressed in your favor of yesterday. In acceding to your request, I trust that the general interest among our people in the college and in the discussion of educational topics will not leave the address without readers. Very respectfully,

E. P. TENNEY.

ADDRESS

UPON THE OCCASION OF THE DEDICATION OF THE COLLEGE

BUILDING, AND THE INAUGURATION OF E. P. TENNEY, AS
PRESIDENT OF COLORADO COLLEGE, MAY 31, 1882.

By E. P. TENNEY.

These Commencement occasions which mark the opening summer all over the land, relating as they do to the world's youth, are as little likely to weary us by repetition as the sunrise. We, living far inland, to-day imitate the great educational bodies upon the Atlantic by holding a little commencement; as inter-oceanic waters, like Ontario and Superior, have tides of an inch or two imitating the great sea,

Our graduation class of two is, however, as many as Amherst began with; twice as many as the Yale College first class; and one-third the number of the first graduates of Princeton. The first class of Harvard went forth six years after the first steps were taken to found the University; the same time that has now elapsed since the revival of our college. So that in these points our first commencement is honorable as the beginnings of the foremost colleges in the land.

The first meeting of the trustees of an Illinois college, now coming to some dignity of age and usefulness, was held in an unfinished college building amid shavings and lumber and carpenter benches; and we are ourselves little inclined to offer apology for uncased windows and other indications of our need of money to make our house as good as our work.

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