Imágenes de páginas
PDF
[ocr errors][graphic][graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]

S E QUEL

THE ENGLISH READER :

ELEGANT SELECTIONS

IN PRose AND PoETRY.

nesigned to IMPROVE
THE HIGHEST CLASS OF LEARNERS IN READING

TO ESTABLISH
A TASTE FOR JUST AND ACCURATE COMPOSITION:

ANd to promote

THE INTERESTS OF PIETY AND VIRTUE.

BY LINDLEY MURRAY,

AUTHOR OF AN “ENGLISH GRAMMAR ADAPTED TO THE DIFFERENT
CLAsses of LEARNERs,” &c.

N E W Y O R K :
PUBLISHED BY J()HN S. TAYLOR & CO.

AT T:IE NEW YORK SUNDAY SCHOOL AND JUVENILE BOOK DEPOSITORY
Brick Church Chapel, 145 Nassau Street.

1844.

[merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]

INTRODUCTION. o

The “English Reader” has been so favourably received by the public, as to encourage the Compiler to hope, that the present volume will not be deemed unworthy of attention. It pursues the same objects as the former work; it preserves the same chaste attention to the morals of youth; its materials are taken from the most correct and elegant writers: and as the pieces are generally more extended, and contain a greater variety of style and composition, it is presumed that it forms a proper “Sequel to the Reader,” and is calculated to improve, both in schools and in private families, the highest class of young readers. In selecting materials for the poetical part of his work, the Compiler met with few authors, the whole of whose writings were unexception able. Some of them have had unguarded moments, in which they have written what is not proper to come under the motice of youth. He must not therefore be understood as recommending every production of âll the poets who have contributed to his selection.* Judicious parents and tutors, who feel the importance of a guar.'ed education, will find it incumbent upon them to select for their children and pupils, such writings, both in prose and poetry, as are proper for their perusal; and young persons will evince their virtue and gon,... sense, by cordially acquiescing in the judgment of those who are deeply interested in their welfare. Perhaps the best reason that can be offered, in favour of poeti cal selections for the use of young and innocent minds, is, the tendenc which they have, when properly made, to preserve the chastity of their sentiments, and the purity of their morals. In “The Sequel,” as well as in “The English Reader,” several pieces are introduced, which in a striking manner display the beauty and excellence of the Christian religion. Extracts of this kind, if frequently diffused amongst the elements of literature, would doubtless produce happy effects on the minds of youth; and contribute very materially to counteract, both the open and the secret labours of Infidelity. With these views, the Compiler derived particular satisfaction, in selecting those pieces which are calculated to attach the young mind to a religion perfectly adapted to the condition of man; and which not only furnishes the most rational and sublime enjoyments in this life, but secures complete and permanent felicity hereafter.

*Justice to the authors from whose writings the extracts were made, and regard to the credit of the present work, rendered the insertion of names indispensable.

« AnteriorContinuar »