The Pleasures of Benevolence: A Poem

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Hunter, 1835 - 163 páginas
 

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Página 155 - An invisible and impalpable barrier made effectual against a force the most violent and irresistible in its operations ; and a power, that in its tremendous effects seemed to emulate the lightning and the earthquake, confined within a narrow space, and shut up in a net of the most slender texture, — are facts which must excite a degree of wonder and astonishment, from which neither ignorance nor wisdom can defend the beholder. When to this we add the beneficial consequences and the saving of the...
Página 154 - This is exactly such a case as we should choose to place before Bacon, were he to revisit the earth, in order to give him, in a small compass, an idea of the advancement which philosophy has made, since the time when he had pointed out to her the route which she ought to pursue.
Página 150 - Learn from yon orient shell to love thy foe, And store with pearls the hand that brings thee woe : Free, like yon rock, from base vindictive pride, Emblaze with gems the wrist that rends thy side : Mark where yon tree rewards the stony shower With fruit nectareous, or the balmy flower : All Nature calls aloud — " Shall man do less Than heal the smiter, and the railer bless ?
Página 152 - ... activity requisite in supporting such a desperate cause. This was Bartholomew de las Casas, a native of Seville, and one of the clergymen sent out with Columbus in his second voyage to Hispaniola, in order to settle in that island. He early adopted the opinion prevalent among ecclesiastics with respect to the unlawfulness of reducing the natives to servitude ; and that he might demonstrate the sincerity of his conviction, he relinquished all the Indians who had fallen to his...
Página 150 - Learn from yon Orient shell to love thy foe, And store with pearls the hand that brings thee woe: Free like yon rock, from base, vindictive pride, Emblaze with gems the wrist that rends thy side; Mark where yon tree rewards the stony shower With fruit nectareous, or the balmy flower, All Nature cries aloud : shall man do less Than heal the smiter, and the railer bless...
Página 151 - ... a few hours ; but that which he has appointed lasts many weeks, nay, sometimes years. The poor wretches are plunged into a noisome dungeon, as bad as the black hole at Calcutta, from which they are taken only if they confess what is laid to their charge.
Página 147 - ... because it has the misfortune to be rare or beautiful; nor shall I ever forget the couplet of...
Página 148 - The poor beetle, which we tread upon, In corporal sufferance feels a pang as great As when a giant dies.
Página 152 - A lady applied to him on behalf of an orphan. After he had given liberally, she said, ' When he is old enough, I will teach him to name and thank his benefactor.' ' Stop (said the good man), thou art mistaken — we do not thank the clouds for the rain. Teach him to look higher, and thank Him who giveth both the clouds and the rain.
Página 147 - ... perish in a cold nest, because it has gay plumage, and has never been accurately delineated, or deprive even a butterfly of its natural enjoyments, .because it. has the misfortune to be rare or beautiful...

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