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PARAGRAPHS 92–94—POTTERY. value of its contents; the freight from factory to port of exportation is $2.11, equal to 15.16 per cent and from that point to port of entry in the United States is $2.17, equal to 15.60 per cent. While the tariff provides a tax of 60 per cent on decorated goods, by the inclusion of the value of the case and packing at the same rate of duty, the actual duty is $9.79, equal to 70.37 per cent.

Taking into consideration all the various dutiable items as shown by this illustration, it costs the importer $16.82 to land $13.91 worth of merchandise, which makes 120.91 per cent actual protection on the cost price at factory. These are startling figures and show beyond cavil or question what the real protection is that has favored these domestic potteries and is driving the cheaper grades of imported ware from the market.

During the last ten years the importation of decorated china have on the whole remained about stationary; in some years showing a slight increase, in others a decrease. This, in spite of the fact that in these ten years the population of the United States bas greatly increased, and in the same period the production of domestic goods has increased annually, until now it reaches a yearly output of over $16,000,000. Attention is particularly directed to the fact that this growth and increase continued during the period when the duty on decorated china was only 35 per cent.

A cogent argument in the nature of a concrete proposition which shows clearly the relative positions of foreign and domestic wares are the exhibits we show herewith, giving the actual cost price of certain articles laid down at the port of entry, compared with that of similar merchandise of domestic manufacture. Attention is also directed to the fact that in selling the domestic goods the domestic manufacturer has his profit and selling cost figured in the prices stated and given in the illustrative exhibits, while the prices given for the imported goods do not include the importer's profit or selling expense, but represent the bare cost of importation laid down at the port of entry. If likewise the importer's profit should be added to the price of the imported article, the difference in percentage would be still more pronounced. The value at which domestic goods are put on the market and the cost of the imported article at the port of entry indicates plainly that the present tariff is highly excessive. These are concrete examples and speak for themselves more clearly than arguments or long tables of figures. Difference in percentage of value of imported and domestic articles based on foreign cost

and domestic selling price.

EXHIBIT 1.
Austrian dinner plate, costing $1.541 a dozen.
Dinner set, represented by Exhibit 1, consisting of 100 pieces-12 plates, 8

inches; 12 plates, 6 inches; 12 coupé soups, 6 inches; 12 saucers, 4 inches;
12 individual butters, 12 teas and saucers, 2 covered dishes, 1 sauceboat
and stand, 1 pickle, 1 baker, 1 covered butter and drainer, 1 covered sugar
30s, 1 cream 30s, 1 meat dish, 12 inches; 1 meat dish, 14 inches-costs laid
down at Baltimore, including all charges, excepting importer's profit and
selling expense, $9.69 a set.

ILLUSTRATIVE EXHIBIT 1. Domestic dinner plate, selling at $0.67} a dozen...

128. 10 Dinner set of 100 pieces, same combination as above, represented by Illustrative Exhibit No. 1, selling at $4.94 a set...

96.1 EXHIBIT 2. Austrian dinner plate, costing $1.32 a dozen. Dinner set, represented by Exhibit 2, consisting of 100 pieces, costs laid down

at Baltimore, including all charges, excepting importer's profit and selling expense, $8.37 a set.

ILLUSTRATIVE EXHIBIT 2.

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Domestic dinner plate, selling at 714 cents a dozen..
Dinner set of 100 pieces, represented by Illustrative Exhibit No. 2, same

combination as above, selling at $5.21 a set.....

603

EXHIBIT 3.

Austrian dinner plate, costing $2.57 a dozen.
Dinner set, represented by Exhibit 3, consisting of 100 pieces, costs laid down

at Baltimore, including all charges, excepting importer's profit and selling
expense, $16.24 a set.

PARAGRAPHS 92–94POTTERY.

ILLUSTRATIVE EXHIBIT 3.

801

Domestic dinner plate, selling at $1.424 a dozen....
Dinner set of 100 pieces, represented by Illustrative Exhibit No. 3, same

combination as above, selling at $10.40 a set

56%

EXHIBIT 4.

Austrian dinner plate, costing $1.54 a dozen.
Dinner set, represented by Exhibit 5, consisting of 100 pieces, costs laid down

at Baltimore, including all charges, excepting importer's profit and selling
expense, $10.11 a set.

ILLUSTRATIVE EXHIBIT 4.

1054

Domestic dinner plate, selling at $0.75 a dozen..
Dinner set, 100 pieces, represented by Illustrative Exhibit 5, same combina-

tion as above, selling at $5.48 a set......

841

EXHIBIT 5.
German dinner plate, costing $1.754 a dozen.
Dinner set, represented by Exhibit 6, consisting of 100 pieces, same com-

bination as above, costs laid down at Baltimore, including all charges,
excepting importer's profit and selling expense, $11.15 a set.

ILLUSTRATIVE EXHIBIT 5.

134

Domestic dinner plate, selling at $0.75 a dozen...
Dinner set of 100 pieces, represented by Illustrative Exhibit 6, same com-

bination as above, selling at $5.48 a set..

1031

EXHIBIT 6.

German plate, costs laid down in Baltimore, including all charges, excepting

importer's profit and selling expense, $0.70 10/12 a dozen.

ILLUSTRATIVE EXHIBIT 6.

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Domestic plate comparable with Exhibit No. 11. Sold in this market by the domestic potteries at $0.404 a dozen.....

74.9 It may be claimed that the imported articles for which prices are given above are china, while the domestic articles are earthenware. While this is true, we particularly direct attention to the fact that the appearance of both is the same, and that the articles of domestic earthenware above mentioned are sold in this country in direct competition with the imported chinaware. We point out further that many of the articles of domestic earthenware are plainly stamped with the word “china, indicating the intention of the domestic manufacturer to lead the consumer to believe that he is buying china and not earthenware (see Illustrative Exhibita No8. 4 and 8); Attention is further directed to Illustrative Exhibit No. 8, marked “Dresden china, and No. 9, marked "Limoges china," and Exhibit 7, all of which are earthenware of domestic manufacture.

Attention is also called to the fact that in making the above comparisons we have used similar classes of decorations.

Yesterday it was stated here that $15,000,000 worth of tableware was manufactured here against importations of $11,000,000 in foreign value, but this is not correct, because in this $11,000,000 is included a goodly portion of goods that are not tableware at all, for instance; vases, statuettes, busts, figures, umbrella stands, flower pots, clock cases, steins, plaques, cuspidores, lamps, pedestals, toy tea sets, etc. We have not the figures at our disposal as no separation is made for statistical purposes by the Government, but we believe there are from 25 to 33} per cent of the total importations of white and decorated chinaware.

Attention is also called to the fact that while the said $11,000,000 are correct so far as the year 1911 is concerned, during 1912 the importations decreased to $9,997,698.

In view of all these statements herein made it is respectively submitted that 35 per cent duty on decorated as well as white chinaware affords ample protection to the domestic potters and the revenue. In addition, it is submitted, that no duty should be imposed on the outside cases, casks, or crates.

PARAGRAPHS 92-94--POTTERY.

EXHIBIT B.

One case containing 60 dozen decorated German china creamers, at 1 mark, equalo 2316 cents a dozen, $14.28.

Weight, 517 pounds; measure, 44.97 cubic feet.

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On the basis of 1912 ocean freight rates it cost $16.62 to land $14.28 worth of china creamers in Baltimore.

EXHIBIT C.

One case containing 60 dozen decorated German china cups and saucers, at 1.50 marks, equals 357 cents a dozen, $21.42.

Weight, 770 pounds; measure, 39.7 cubic feet.

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On the basis of 1912 ocean freight rates, it cost $22,14 to land $21.42 worth of china cups and saucers in Baltimore.

EXHIBIT D. One case containing 12 dozen decorated German china cuspidors, at 4.25 marks, equals $1.01 a dozen.

Weight, 440 pounds; measure, 36 cubic feet.

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On the basis of 1912 ocean freight rates it cost $13.95 to land $12.12 worth of china cuspidors in Baltimore.

PARAGRAPHS 92-94-POTTERY.

Exhibit E. One case containing 60 dozen decorated German china cups and saucers, at 1.40 marks, equals 33} cents, $20.

Weight 770 pounds, measure 39.7 cubic feet.

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On the basis of 1912 ocean freight rates it cost $21.32 to land $20 worth of china cups and saucers in Baltimore.

EXHIBIT F.

One case containing 125 dozen decorated German china plates, at 1 mark, equals 23% cents a dozen, $29.79.

Weight 686 pounds, measure 29.6 cubic feet.

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On the basis of 1912 ocean freight rates it cost $26.24 to land $29.79 worth of china plates in Baltimore.

EXHIBIT G.

One case containing 60 dozen decorated German china plates, at 1.50 marks, equals 354 cents, $21.45.

Weight, 599 pounds; measure, 36 cubic feet.

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Cost of case.
Freight from German factory to European port..
Ocean freight to Baltimore (38 cents per 100 pounds).
Marine insurance, customs entry, loss 1 month interest, cartago.
60 per cent duty on value of goods.
60 per cent on value of case..

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$21.45

1.92

23.37

14.02

65.21

21.05

98. 12

On the basis of 1912 ocean freight rates it cost $21.05 to land $21.45 worth of china plates in Baltimore.

PARAGRAPHS 92-94-POTTERY.

ЕхнІвт Н.

One case containing 100 dozen decorated German china oatmeals at 1 mark equals 23 cents a dozen, $23.80.

Weight, 737 pounds; measure, 36 cubic feet.

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On the basis of 1912 ocean freight rates it cost $23.54 to land $23.80 worth of china oatmeals in Baltimore.

EXHIBIT I.

One case containing 120 dozen decorated German china fruit saucers, at 90 marks, equals 2140 cents a dozen, $25.68.

Weight, 647 pounds; measure, 25.4 cubic feet.

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On the basis of 1912 ocean freight rates it cost $23.44 to land $25.68 worth of china fruit saucers in Baltimore.

EXHIBIT J.

One case containing 132 dozen decorated German china fruit saucers, 80 marks, equals 19 cents a dozen, $25.08.

Weight, 544 pounds; measure, 26.6 cubic feet.

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Cost of case..
Freight from German factory to European port.
Ocean freight to Baltimore (38 cents per 100 pounds)..
Marine insurance, customs entry, loss 1 month interest, cartage
60 per cent duty on value of goods..
60 per cent duty on value of case...

.58

2.31

$25. OS

1.68

26. 76

16.06

64.03

22. 39

89. 27

On the basis of 1912 ocean freight rates it cost $22.39 to land $25.08 worth of china fruit saucers in Baltimore.

78939°-VOL 1--13--13

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