Constructive English for the higher grades of the grammar school

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C. Scribner's sons, 1915 - 465 páginas
 

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Contenido

How to Work Out a Subject
24
Sources of Material
25
Story Plot Problems
26
Story Plot Problems continued
29
Story Plot Problems continued
32
Story Plot Problems continued
36
Story Plot Problems continued
38
A Worker and an Industry
41
The Hero
44
vii
46
The Dell and the Brook
47
A River
51
The Story of Peepsy and the Moon
53
The Seasons
59
The Dandelion
60
Purple Sandwort
61
Sweet Peas
63
The Bluebells Reward
64
V1olets
67
A Song of Clover
69
The Vine
70
The Tree
72
Woodman Spare That Tree
74
Robert of Lincoln
78
To the Cuckoo
79
Some SongBirds
82
Some SongBirds continued
84
The Magpie
85
The Rook
86
The Crow
87
Some Birds That Fish
88
The Stormy Petrel
89
The Owl
90
LESSON PAGE XLV The Eagle
95
Building a Nest
98
A Wrens Nest
99
The Usefulness or Birds
101
A Bird and a Butterfly
103
The Butterfly
104
The Ant
113
The Ant continued
114
The Ant continued
117
Ly Story Features Afforded by the Ant
119
Scenes of Ant Activity
120
Ants as Actors
124
An Ant Compared to a Human Being
125
How to Write the Story Composition
128
The Bee
132
The Bee continued
135
The Beehive
141
The Spider
143
The Spider continued
144
Story Construction on the Spider
149
The Snail
151
Squirrels
153
The Horse
158
PART II
162
The House Site
166
How a House May be Given Life
171
A Type of House
173
The House as a Home
175
The Ethical Teaching of Building
178
A WordPicture of a House
181
The People or Characters
185
How to Describe People
188
A Type of Character
192
Character Studies
193
Character Studies continued
194
Working from Suggestion
196
A House and Its People
201
The Farmer and His Land
206

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Página 288 - I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay; Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
Página 393 - Over earth and ocean with gentle motion This pilot is guiding me, Lured by the love of the genii that move In the depths of the purple sea...
Página 424 - And fast through the midnight dark and drear, Through the whistling sleet and snow, Like a sheeted ghost, the vessel swept Tow'rds the reef of Norman's Woe. And ever the fitful gusts between, A sound came from the land; It was the sound of the trampling surf On the rocks and the hard sea-sand.
Página 221 - How often have I blest the coming day, When toil remitting lent its turn to play, And all the village train, from labour free, Led up their sports beneath the spreading tree, While many a pastime circled in the shade, The young contending as the old surveyed; And many a gambol frolicked o'er the ground, And sleights of art and feats of strength went round.
Página 425 - At daybreak, on the bleak sea-beach, A fisherman stood aghast, To see the form of a maiden fair, Lashed close to a drifting mast. The salt sea was frozen on her breast, The salt tears in her eyes ; And he saw her hair, like the brown sea-weed, On the billows fall and rise. Such was the wreck of the Hesperus, In the midnight and the snow ! Christ save us all from a death like this On the reef of Norman's Woe ! THE LUCK OF EDENHALL.
Página 325 - What thou art, we know not ; What is most like thee ? From rainbow clouds there flow not Drops so bright to see, As from thy presence showers a rain of melody.
Página 370 - Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Página 23 - Knowledge never learned of schools, Of the wild bee's morning chase, Of the wild-flower's time and place, Flight of fowl and habitude Of the tenants of the wood; How the tortoise bears his shell, How the woodchuck digs his cell, And the ground-mole sinks his well; How the robin feeds her young, How the oriole's nest is hung...
Página 327 - Yet if we could scorn Hate, and pride, and fear; If we were things born Not to shed a tear, I know not how thy joy we ever should come near.
Página 412 - Unwarmed by any sunset light The gray day darkened into night A night made hoary with the swarm And whirl-dance of the blinding storm, As zigzag, wavering to and fro, Crossed and recrossed the winged snow: And ere the early bedtime came The white drift piled the window-frame, And through the glass the clothes-line posts Looked in like tall and sheeted ghosts.

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