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I love to plough ; I love to sow;
I love to gather; love to mow;
I love the new-mown grass to smell,
I love to hear the tinkling bell;
I love to tread the grassy lawn,
Along the brooks, among the corn;
I love the whole,—but can't rehearse
Its pleasures all, in prose or verse.

AN ODE TO RAIN.-COLERIDGE.

1. I KNOW it is dark; and though I have lain

Awake, as I guess, an hour or twain,
I have not once open'd the lids of my eyes,
But lie in the dark, as a blind man lies.
O Rain! that I lie listening to,

You're but a doleful sound at best:
1
owe you

little thanks, 'tis true
For breaking thus my needful rest,
Yet if, as soon as it is light,
O Rain! you will but take your flight,
I'll neither rail nor malice keep,
Though sick and sore for want of sleep.
But only now for this one day,
Do
go,

dear Rain ! do go away

2. O Rain! with your dull two-fold sound,

The clash hard by, and the murmur all round !
You know if you know aught, that we,
Both night and day, but ill agree :
For days, and months, and almost years,
Have limp'd on through this vale of tears,
Since body of mine and rainy weather,
Have lived on easy terms together.

Yet if as soon as it is light,
O Rain! you will but take your flight,
Though you should come again to morrow,
And bring with you both pain and sorrow;
Though stomach should sicken, and knees should swell-
I'll nothing speak of you but well.
But only for this one day,
Do go, dear Rain! do go away!

3. Dear Rain! I ne'er refuse to say

You're a good creature in your way.
Nay, I could write a book myself,
Would fit a parson's lower shelf,
Showing how very good you are.
What then? sometimes it must be fair,
And if sometimes, why not to-day?
Do go, dear Rain! do go away!

4. Dear Rain ! if I've been cold and shy,

Take no offense! I'll tell you why.
A dear old Friend e'en now is here,
And with him came my sister dear;
After long absence now first met,
Long months by pain and grief beset
With three dear Friends ! in truth, we groan
Impatiently to be alone.
We three you mark! and not one more !
The strong wish makes my spirit sore.
We have so much to talk about,
So many sad things to let out;
So many tears in our eye-corners,
Sitting like little Jacky Horners
In short, as soon as it day,

dear Rain! do go away.

Do go,

5. And this I'll vow to you, dear Rain !

Whenever you shall come again,
Be you as dull as e'er you could ;
(And by the bye 'tis understood,
You're not so pleasant, as you're good ;)
Yet knowing well your worth and place,
I'll welcome you with cheerful face;
And though you stay a week or more,
Were ten times duller than before;
Yet with kind heart, and right good will,
I'll sit and listen to you still ;
Nor should you go away, dear Rain !
Uninvited to remain,
But only now, for this one day,
Do go, dear Rain! do go away.

THE SHIP “EXTRAVAGANCE."

1. OH! Extravagance saileth in climes bright and warm

She is built for the sunlight, and not for the storm;
Her anchor is gold, and her mainmast is pride-
Every sheet in the wind does she dashingly ride!
But Content is a vessel not built for display,
Though she's ready and steady—come storm when it may,
So give us Content as life's channel we steer,
If our pilot be Caution, we've little to fear!

2. Oh! Extravagance saileth ʼmid glitter and show,

As if Fortune's rich tide never ebbed in its glow;
But see her at night, when her gold-light is spent,
When her anchor is gone, and her silken sails rent;
When the wave of destruction her shatter'd side drinks,
And the billows-ha! ha!-laugh and shout as she sinks ;
No! give us Content, as life's channel we steer,
While our pilot is Caution, there's little to fear

A CURIOUS COSMETIC.

1. The Rev. J. Williams, the well-known missionary so long resident in the South Sea Islands, taught the natives to manufacture lime from the coral of their shores. The effects it produced upon them, and the uses to which they applied it, he thus facetiously describes :-“ After having laughed at the process of burning, which they believed to be to cook the coral for food, what was their astonishment when, in the morning, they found his cottage glittering in the rising sun, white as snow. They danced, they sang, they shouted, and screamed

with joy.

2. The whole island was soon in a commotion, given up to wonder and curiosity; and the laughable scenes which ensued, after they got possession of the brush and whitewash tub, baffle description. The bon ton immediately voted it a valuable cosmetic, and superlatively happy did many a swarthy coquette consider herself could she but enhance her charms by a daub with the white brush.

3. Now party spirit ran high, as it will do in more civilized countries, as to who was, or who was not, best entitled to preference. One party urged their superior rank and riches; a second had got the brush, and were determined at all events to keep it; and a third tried to overturn the whole, that they might obtain some of the sweepings. They did not even scruple to rob each other of the little share that some had been so happy as to procure.

4. But soon new lime was prepared, and in a week not a hut, a domestic utensil, a war-club, or a garment, but was white as snow-not an inhabitant but had his skin painted with the most grotesque figures—not a pig but was similarly whitened—and even mothers might be seen in every direction, capering with extravagant gestures, and yelling with delight at the superior beauty of their whitewashed infants."

THE LOVE OF THE WORLD DETECTED.-COWPER.

1. Thus says the prophet of the Turk :

Good Mussulman abstain from pork:
There is a part in ev'ry swine
No friend or follower of mine
May taste, whate'er his inclination,
On pain of excommunication,

2. Such Mahomet's mysterious charge,

And thus he left the point at large.
Had he the sinful part express'd,
They might with safety eat the rest :
But for one piece they thought it hard
From the whole hog to be debarr'd;
And set their wit at work to find

What joint the prophet had in mind. 3. Much controversy straight arose :

These choose the back, the belly those ;
By some 'tis confidently said,
He meant not to forbid the head;
While others at that doctrine rail,
And piously prefer the tail.
Thus, conscience freed from ev'ry clog,

Mahometans eat up the hog.
4. You laugh ; 'tis well : the tale applied,

May make you laugh on t other side.
“Renounce the world,” the preacher cries :
“We do," a multitude replies.
While one as innocent regards
A snug and friendly game at cards;
And, one, whatever you may say,
Can see no evil in a play;
Some love a concert, or a race,
And others, shooting and the chase.

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