Constitutional History of the American Revolution

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Univ of Wisconsin Press, 1995 - 149 páginas

Designed for use in courses, this abridged edition of the four-volume Constitutional History of the American Revolution demonstrates how significant constitutional disputes were in instigating the American Revolution. John Phillip Reid addresses the central constitutional issues that divided the American colonists from their English legislators: the authority to tax, the authority to legislate, the security of rights, the nature of law, the foundation of constitutional government in custom and contractarian theory, and the search for a constitutional settlement. Reid's distinctive analysis discusses the irreconcilable nature of this conflict—irreconcilable not because leaders in politics on both sides did not desire a solution, but because the dynamics of constitutional law impeded a solution that permitted the colonies to remain part of the dominions of George III.

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Contenido

THE AUTHORITY OF THE CONSTITUTION
3
THE AUTHORITY TO Tax
26
THE AUTHORITY TO LEGISLATE
49
THE AUTHORITY TO REGULATE
73
THE AUTHORITY OF THE PREROGATIVE
85
CONCLUSION
100
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
109
SHORT TITLES
110
NOTES
129
INDEX
141
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Acerca del autor (1995)

John Phillip Reid is professor of law at New York University. His Constitutional History of the American Revolution includes four volumes also published by the University of Wisconsin Press: The Authority of Rights, The Authority to Tax, The Authority to Legislate, and The Authority of Law.

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