The White House Looks South: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Lyndon B. Johnson

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LSU Press, 2005 - 668 páginas
Perhaps not southerners in the usual sense, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, and Lyndon B. Johnson each demonstrated a political style and philosophy that helped them influence the South and unite the country in ways that few other presidents have. Combining vivid biography and political insight, William E. Leuchtenburg offers an engaging account of relations between these three presidents and the South while also tracing how the region came to embrace a national perspective without losing its distinctive sense of place. According to Leuchtenburg, each man had one foot below the Mason-Dixon Line, one foot above. Their intimate associations with the South gave these three presidents an empathy toward and acceptance in the region. Roosevelt could speak as a neighbor and adopted son, Truman as a borderstater who had been taught to revere the Lost Cause, and Johnson as a native who had been scorned by Yankees.
 

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Contenido

PROLOGUE I
1
ROOSEVELT
18
Georgia Squire
29
The FDR Coalition
73
Liberalizing Dixie
79
Intimations of a Coming Storm
119
HARRY S TRUMAN
145
BorderState Democrat
147
The Lone Cowpoke from Dixie
229
Southerner with a National Face
267
Nigra Nigra Nigra
301
The Agony of Victory
327
The White House Looks South
347
The South on the Move
385
NOTES
419
BIBLIOGRAPHY
535

Scourging the Scalawag
175
The Liberal Nationalist
203
LYNDON B JOHNSON
219

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Acerca del autor (2005)

Born in Ridgewood (Queens), New York, William Leuchtenburg is currently William Rand Kenan, Jr. Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was educated at Cornell University and at Columbia University, from which he received his Ph.D. in 1951. After teaching briefly at Smith College and Harvard University, he began a 30-year tenure on the faculty at Columbia, where he became De Witt Clinton Professor of American History in 1971. He has served as president of the Organization of American Historians, the Society of American Historians, and most recently (1991) the American Historical Association. He has also been Harmsworth Professor at Oxford University. Leuchtenburg is an expert on twentieth-century U.S. political history, especially the era of the New Deal. His book Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal, 1932--1940 (1963) won both the Bancroft and Parkman prizes.

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