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THE

Chicago National Bank

Dearborn and Monroe sts.,
CHICAGO.

CAPITAL • • $500,000

SURPLUS AND PROFITS. 500.000

CURRENT ACCOUNTS kept in conformity with the practice of Chicago Banks. Parties keeping current accounts can have approved commercial paper discounted and can obtain loans on negotiable securities.

DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS. Money in sums of fifty dollars and upward received from the public generally, repayable on demand. If deposited for a fixed term, interest is allowed according to the state of the money market. Parties keeping current accounts can transfer any part of their balance to deposit account.

LETTERS OF CREDIT FOR TRAVELERS issued available in the principal cities of the world. Foreign Exchange bought and sold.

CORRESPONDENCE or a personal interview with a view to business relations respectfully invited.

DIRECTORS: F. MADLENER, FERD. W. PECK,

ADOLPH LOEB, J. R. WALSH,

HENRY H. NASH, WILLIAM COX,

ANDREW McNALLY.

J. R. WALSH, President.

H. H. NASH, Vice-President.
WiLLIAM COX, Cashier.

F. M. BLOUNT, Ass't-Cashier.

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COMPILED BY GEO. E. PLUMBE, A. B., LL. B.

SEVENTH YEAR.

ISSUED BY

THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS.

The year 1890 has been one of the most remarkable ones in the history of American politics. The legislation of congress has been unusually important. The tariff has been entirely remodeled; pension expenditures have been largely in creased; new stales have been aamilted; provision has been made for the holding of the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago; the eleventh census has been taken, and the currency system of the nation has been unsettled by silver legislation. Not for many years have so gieat changes been noted in the political sentiments of the people. For these reasons the political statistics of 1890 are of unusual interest and value, and every effort has been made to make the record accurate and complete. The reports if the eleventh census—only partially completed at this date—have been laid under contribution in so far as they are available.

The DAIL Y NE WS ALMANAC for 1891 is unusually replete with information in all departmentseducatwtial, political, financial and s'attsticaland will so equp the reader with accurate knowledge of the facts involved as to enable him to apply an intelligent judgment to the consideration of every important public question.

The DAILY NEWS ALMANAC for 1891 is nearly double the size of any preceding issue and is submitted to its patrons with the confident expectation that it will be found to still better meet the requirements of a comprehensive, accurate and concise American year-book. At the same time it is remembered that statistical works of this kind can never, in th^e nature of the case, be absolutely without error, and while every effort has been made to approximate perfection in this issue the editor renews his invitation to all friends of the work to be favored with their criticisms and suggestions for the still further improvement of the issue for 1892.

Chicago, January, 1891.

1891.

ECLIPSES. *

In the year 1891 there will be four eclipses—two of the Sun and two of the Moon, and a Transit of Mercury over the Sun's Disk.

I. A Total Eclipse of the Moon, May 23. Invisible. Visible more or less to Europe, Asia* Africa, Australia, the Western Pacific and South Atlantic Oceana.

II. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, June 6. Visible to North America, as a partial eclipBe, north and west of a line drawn from the mouth of the St. Lawrence River, through Ottawa, Detroit, St. Louis, Dallas (Texas), and Sinaloa (Mexico): to Europe. Siberia and the Arctic Ocean. Being annular in Siberia and adjacent Arctic Ocean. Occurring as follows:

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III. A Total Eclipse of the Moon, November 15. Visible more or less to Europe. Asia, Africa. North and South America, Atlantic and Eastern Pacific Oceans. Occurring as follows:

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First contact of shadow 55 degrees from north point of the Moon's limb toward the east. Magnitude of eclipse equals 1.393 (.moon's diameter equals 1).

IV. A Partial Eclipse of the Sun, December 1. Invisible. Visible around the South Pole and to the southern extremity of South America.

A Transit Op Mercury, May 9. Visible more or less to North America, west of Maine and Quebec, Europe, Asia, eastern Africa, Australia, and Pacific Ocean.

MORNING AND EVENING STARS.

Mercury will be Morning Star about February 6, June 5, and September 28; and Evening Star about April 18, August 16, and December 11.

Venus will be Morning Star till September 18; and Evening Star the rest of the year.

Jupiter will be Evening Star till February 13; then Morning Star till September 5, and Evening Star again the rest of the year.

CHURCH DAYS AND CYCLES OF TIME.

Circumcision Jan. 1

Epiphany Jan. 6

Septuagesima Ian. 25

Candlemas Feb. 2

Shrove Sunday Feb. 8

Ash Wednesday Feb. 11

First Sunday in Lent..Feb. 15

Purim Alar. 24

8. Patrick Mar. 17

Palm Sunday Mar.22

Good Friday Mar. 27

EaBter Sunday Mar. 29

LowSunday Apr. 5

First day of Pesach Apr. 23

Rogation Sunday May 3

Ascension Day May 7

Whitsunday May 17

Trinity Sunday May 24

CorpusChrlstl May 28

Mohammedan New Y'r. Aug. 7

Michaelmas Day Sept.29

Hebrew New Year(5652).Oct. 3

Advent Sunday Nov. 29

Dominical Letter D.

Epact 20

Golden Number 11

Solar Cycle 24

Roman in diction 4

Julian Period 6604

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