Over-population, and Its Remedy: Or, An Inquiry Into the Extent and Causes of the Distress Prevailing Among the Labouring Classes of the British Islands, and Into the Means of Remedying it

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1846 - 446 páginas

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Página 209 - That call'd them from their native walks away ; When the poor exiles, every pleasure past, Hung round the bowers, and fondly...
Página 209 - The man of wealth and pride Takes up a space that many poor supplied ; Space for his lake, his park's extended bounds, Space for his horses, equipage, and hounds...
Página 209 - Where then, ah! where, shall poverty reside, To 'scape the pressure of contiguous pride? If to some common's fenceless limits strayed, He drives his flock to pick the scanty blade, Those fenceless fields the sons of wealth divide, And even the bare-worn common is denied.
Página 260 - ... wretched, nasty cabins, without chimney, window, or doorshut ; even worse than those of the savage Americans, and wholly unfit for the making merchantable butter, cheese, or the manufactures of woollen, linen, or leather.
Página 205 - ... would be your answer to the people of Washington, Oregon, and California to that problem? Mr. BOWER. First of all, not all of the 28,000 come from the Pacific Coast States. Only half of them probably. Senator BONE. Well, seasonal workers. They don't come from Idaho and Utah and Montana. Mr. BOWER. There is only a certain amount of work to be done and the problem is how to divide it. Senator BONE. That is the problem in this whole thing. If we take it from one fellow we make a problem for the...
Página 86 - They are a frugal, industrious, and intelligent race, inhabiting a district for the most part inferior in natural fertility to the southern portion of Ireland ; but cultivating it better, and paying higher rents in proportion to the quality of the land, notwithstanding the higher rate of wages.
Página 86 - ... day ; yet the peasantry are a robust, active, and athletic race, capable of great exertion ; often exposed to great privations ; ignorant, but eager for instruction ; and readily trained, under judicious management, to habits of order and steady industry.
Página 109 - These are, it appears, the beggars' houses : any one may build a lodge against that wall, rent-free ; and such places were never seen ! As for drawing them, it was in vain to try ; one might as well make a sketch of a bundle of rags. An ordinary pig-sty in England is really more comfortable. Most of them were not six feet long or five feet high, built of stones huddled together, a hole being left for the people to creep iu at, a ruined thatch to keep out some little portion of the rain.
Página 192 - I'll therefore buy some cottage near his manor, Which done, I'll make my men break ope his fences, Ride o'er his standing corn, and in the night Set fire on his barns, or break his cattle's legs. These trespasses draw on suits, and suits' expenses, Which I can spare, but will soon beggar him.
Página 192 - I'll make my men break ope his fences, Ride o'er his standing corn, and in the night Set fire on his barns, or break his cattle's legs. These trespasses draw on suits, and suits' expenses, Which I can spare, but will soon beggar him. When I have harried him thus two or three year, Though he sue in forma pauperis, in spite Of all his thrift and care, he'll grow behindhand.

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