The Chinese Enlightenment: Intellectuals and the Legacy of the May Fourth Movement of 1919

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University of California Press, 1986 - 393 pages
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It is widely accepted, both inside China and in the West, that contemporary Chinese history begins with the May Fourth Movement. Vera Schwarcz's imaginative new study provides China scholars and historians with an analysis of what makes that event a turning point in the intellectual, spiritual, cultural and political life of twentieth-century China.
 

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This book examines the May Fourth Movement and its impact on Chinese society, both short and long term. Schwarcz defines the enlightenment as an attempt to reform and modernize the nation’s character ... Read full review

Contents

The Particularity of
1
The Making of a New Generation
12
The demonstration of May 4 1919 ca 1976
14
Ye Shengtao Zhu Ziqing and Yu Pingbo in 1919
21
Aerial view of Beijing University 1915
39
One of the main entrances to Beijing University 1915
40
Cai Yuanpei president of Beijing University 1917
46
Dazhao
50
Zhu Ziqing Luo Jialun and Gu Jicgang of the New Tide 70
128
Entrance to first night school for workers Changxindian
132
Chinese students in Berlin 1923
135
Deng Zhongxia as Communist labor organizer ca 1924
143
The Crucible of Political Violence 19251927
145
Zhu Ziqing Ye Shengtao Yu Pingbo and GuJiegang
155
Toward a New Enlightenment 19281938
195
May Fourth as Allegory
240

Chen Duxiu
51
Hu Shi
52
Chen Hengzhe
57
Qian Xuantong
65
Beijing University students and teachers on an outing
66
Fu Sinian Yu Pingbo and Li Xiaofeng of the New Tide
68
The May Fourth Enlightenment
94
Society 1919
95
Cover of 1949 collection of essays commemorating the
253
Yu Pingbo at eightytwo
261
Zhang Shenfu during an interview with the author May
280
Members of the New Tide Society
303
Officers of the New Tide Society
305
Glossary
349
Index
377
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About the author (1986)

Vera Schwarcz is Professor of East Asian Studies and History at Wesleyan University.

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