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enormous.

Their sales already average 5000 volumes a day, of first-class books, issued at from a fourth to a tenth of their usual cost. There are twenty type-setting machines at work in the establishment, and they issue such works as a reprint of Chambers's Encyclopedia in 15 volumes.

An account is given, with diagrams, of the photophone, the instrument that makes speech visible. Dr. Carpenter described this instrument in his first lecture in Melbourne.

There is in New York an establishment for the manufacture of nonconducting coverings for steam-pipes and boilers, named the ChalmersSpence Company. This new invention prevents the loss of heat through radiation, in steam-pipes, boilers, the hot-air pipes of blast furnaces, &c. The principal article used in the coverings is asbestos, which is found along the shores of the Mediterranean, in China, and in Canada. The use of the coverings saves from 40 to 45 per cent of the heat. This fact ought to create a general demand for the articles.

Some ingenious person has invented a kind of iron armour, studded with spikes, to guard sheep from the attacks of dogs and wolves.

“ But whether the sheep would be safer with a machine of this sort than with the dogs or wolves,” says the editor slily, “is a question which we leave to the reader to decide."

Phillips's new road waggon is an extremely light and swift locomotive, well deserving of the attention of the trade.

The enormous parlour furniture manufactory of Messrs. M. and H. Schrenkeisen, in New York, is figured and described in the number for 9th October. The home demand for the articles turned out is always sufficient to leave no surplus for exportation.

Perkins' improved three-wheeled velocipede is similarly described and figured; and an improved continuous draw-bar for use on railways seems to be an ingenious machine for preventing accidents.

There is also a description, with diagrams, of the cassions used in the excavations at the Hudson River Tunnel. Twenty workmen lost their lives by an accident at the Jersey City entrance of the tunnel on the 21st July last, and these cassions are intended to prevent such accidents in future.

The electric light is superseding gas in the chief American cities. As stated in the last number of the Review, Edison affirms that he has solved the last problem in the great invention; and the daily papers this morning (26th November) announce that the solution of this last problem has been made public. In the Scientific American of 23rd October, a full description is given of Mr. Maxim's incandescent lamp, and of his current regulator. For lighthouses and steamships at sea, this light is the only one, all others being mere makeshifts. There is also a description of the dynamoelectric machine, which shows the invention in a state of absolute perfection. The gas companies had better begin to wind up their affairs ! Edison and Maxim, between them, have superseded gas, just as gas superseded the ancient oil-burners.

Besides the papers enumerated above, these four numbers contain an immense variety of shorter articles on subjects in mechanics, mathematics, and natural history. Nothing in his wide department seems to escape the ken of the vigilant editor of the Scientific American.

269

SOME OPINIONS ON THE VICTORIAN REVIEW

IN ENGLAND AND AMERICA.

THE SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN.

From The Scientific American. New York, U.S.A., 23rd October, 1880.

This is one of the best magazines that comes to this office, from any country. The Victorian Review is published monthly, and its contributors

among the most able and profound writers of the day. The July number, just received, contains papers from several eminent writers, and to better convey an idea of the nature of the publication we append a list of the writers, and the subjects of their several contributions in the July

are

issue:

" Lewes' History of Philosophy,” by C. Hamilton BROMBY (Tasmania); “Nineteenth Century England,” by the Rev. W. H. FITCHETT ; “A Few Words about Béranger," by John E. PERRIN (New Zealand); “Proportional Representation," by GUIDO PADELLETTI (Florence); “Modern Biology," by EDWARD B. SANGER (Adelaide); “The Place of Religion in Fictitious Literature,” by Miss C. H. SPENCE (Adelaide); "A Venetian Dramatist,” by JAMES SMITH; “Sermons on Genesis, by Dr. Bromby," by the Very Rev. the DEAN OF MELBOURNE; “Gæthe's Faust and Byron's Manfred,” by R. COLONNA-CLOSE; "The Affairs of Europe," by Emilio CASTELAR (Madrid); “A Menacing Comet,” by RICHARD A. PROCTOR; "The Decay of Matrimony in Victoria," by the EDITOR; “The Contemporary Thought of Great Britain, Europe, and the United States."

We would like to see this Review more widely circulated than it has heretofore been in this country, for it merits an extensive subscription list, if it is published in a remote English colony, on the other side of the globe. We would, therefore, recommend it to the patronage of students, and all thoughtful persons, who, we are sure, will be both interested and benefited by receiving the publication regularly. D. Appleton, 3 Bond-street, New York, receives subscriptions, and furnishes the numbers to their subscribers as soon as they are received.

From The Boston Times, U.S.A., 26th September, 1880. T'he Victorian Review is a magazine of a high order of excellence, and bids fair to take rank in the world of literature with the International and North American Review. It is published in Melbourne, Australia, monthly, and can be found at most of the book-stores in the city.

270

From The Weekly Chronicle, San Francisco, U.S.A., 21st October, 1880.

The Victorian Review, for September (Melbourne, edited by H. MORTIMER FRANKLYN), has a very wide

range

of contents. Noticeable papers are those on “ Railroad Power in the United States," by ARTHUR A. PORTER;“Growth of Dramatic Art,” by WYBERT REEVE; and “The True Solution of the Labour Difficulty in Melbourne and Other Large Centres in Australia," by the Editor.

From Thomas BRASSEY, Esq., M.P. London, 24 Park Lane, W.-The Victorian Review is well-known to me as an ably-conducted magazine, in which are evidently men of great ability.--THOMAS BRASSEY.

London, 11 Downing-street.-I am desired by Lord Hartington to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 7th May.

The Victorian Review is well and favourably known to his lordship.

From HENRY REEVE, Esq., Editor Edinburgh Review. Whitehall, London.—Dear Sir, I have read, with great pleasure, the numbers of The Victorian Review, which you have been so good as to send me, as editor of The Edinburgh Review, and I congratulate you, and the colony on the production of so excellent a periodical.—Henry REEVE.

From CHARLES WARREN STODDARD, Esq.

Rincon Hill, San Francisco.—Your Review would be a credit to any country under the sun. It is astonishingly fine in appearance and in talent. -CHARLES WARREN STODDARD.

The Chicago Times, 28th August, 1880. If any one doubts that the Australians are deficient in learning, literary gifts, or acumen, he should be fair enough to judge them by one of their own standards—The Victorian Review, of Melbourne, of which Mr. H. MORTIMER FRANKLYN is editor. This admirable periodical compares favourably in every respect with the best monthly publications in England. The table of contents of the July number, printed entire, will give the American reader a fair idea of its general scope.

From Sir John LAMBERT, K.C.B. Let me congratulate you on the character and quality of the Victorian Review, which I cannot but regard as a bold undertaking in a young country. If it succeeds as I hope it will, I shall have a high opinion of the literary tastes of your community.—Sir John LAMBERT, K.C.B.

14

2

Ini 3 1918

LIBAN

THE

VICTORIAN REVIEW

EDITED BY H. MORTIMER FRANKLYN.

CONTENTS.

PAGE

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I. The Education Question: A Reply. By The Right REVEREND
LORD BISHOP OF MELBOURNE

271 II. The Strength of Isolation. By Francis Myers (Sydney).

289 III. Education and Brain Development. By JAMES JAMIESON, M.D. 295 IV. A Few Words in Reply to Mr. Hogan's “Coming Australian.”. By H. Ling Roth (Brisbane).

313 V. An Australian Christmas. By James F. HOGAN VI. Solar Heat. By W. P. Wilson

317 VII. The Study of Modern Languages in Victoria. By OTTO MULLER VIII. Cheap Freights and Colonial Industries. By Geo. S. GRIFFITHS IX. Turkey and the Turks. By a Correspondent X. The Public Library. By G. B. BARTON

370 XI. Intercolonial Agreement. By Hon. Sir Henry Parkes, K.C.M.G. (Sydney)

377 XII. Or the System of Cottage Hospitals. By Mrs. F. J. CARTER 382 XIII. Contemporary Thought

328 336 356

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MELBOURNE:
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COLLINS STREET EAST.
London: GORDON & GOTCH.

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[All Rights Reserved.] Advertisements to be sent direct to Manager - Victorian Review,22 Collins S.

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The SINGER MACHINES having become so popular in all parts of the World, are now copied by a horde of German and other imitators.

These German and other imitations are sold under various names, and all are said to be the BEST IN THE WORLD, ACKNOWLEDGED SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS, UNRIVALLED, and so forth, which are not only COPIES of the mechanical constrnction, but also of the STYLE OF CASTINGS, DECORATIONS, and GENERAL APPEARANCE of the Singer Machine.

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AGENTS FOR THE SINGER

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