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Verses to the Poet Crabbe's

Inkstand . . . Moore 135

Woman . . . .Barry Cornwall 51
Where shall we make her

Grave? ... Mrs. Hemans 124

What is Life? . . . Neele 189

Woman and Fame . . Mrs. Hemans 272
We met when Life and Hope

were new . . . A. A. Watts 274

Youth W. Howitt 48

Ye Mariners of England . Campbell 166

TABLE OF FIRST LINES.

A spirit, golden-haired, upon the side

A light is gone from yonder sky

Among the dwellings framed by birds

Alas! they had been friends in youth

A cloud is on iny heart and brow

Art thou a thing of mortal birth

A beautiful and laughing thing

All as he left it' even the pen .

A perilous life, and sad as life may be

Awake! the starry midnight hour

All night the booming minute gun

Away—away—why dost thou linger here

And thou art dead—as young and fair .

And she was passing from the woods away

And is there sadness in thy dreams, my boy?

A white sail gleaming on the flood

A pilgrim of the harp was he

Ay, moralize on love, and deem

And is there glory from the heavens departed I

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Beautiful creature, 1 have been .
Bride I upon thy marriage day .

170

237

Come again! come again!
Come to thy home, beloved!
Come away ! the sunny hours

Page.
Come to my arms, my dear wee pet . . .142

Couldst thou but know what 'tis to weep . 3I/

Day dawned. Within a curtained room . 25

Dear is my little native vale . . . .62

Dost thou idly ask to hear .... 259

Ethereal minstrel! pilgrim of the sky . .I44

Fare thee well! and if for ever .... 223

From the bright stars, or from the viewless air . 232

Fear not that, while around thee . . 252

Farewell I if ever fondest prayer . . . 300

Fare thee well, soul of sweet Romance! farewell . 3I5

Fair images of sleep !..... 320

"Forget thee ?"—If to dream by night, and muse on
thee by day ...... 346

Gone from her cheek is the summer bloom . . 5i

How long shall man's imprison'd spirit groan . . 34

He sleeps, forgetful of his once bright fame . . 40

High on her speculative towei . . .iIi

Hark! through the dim wood dying . .I2i

Hope comes again, to this heart long a stranger . I25

Her hands were clasp'd, her dark eyes raisM . . i46

How happily, how happily the flowers die away! . i49

He stood supreme in lofty genius, proud . . i53

He who hath bent him o'er the dead . . . I74

How sweet and solemn, all alone . . .I76

How beautiful this night! the balmiest sigh . .I88

Hail to this teeming stage of strife! . . .I96

How many thousands are wakening now! . . 2I0

Hark t friends, it strikes; the year's last hour . 22i

His was a harp just fit to pour .... 3I0

How beautiful upon the wave .... 324

Her mighty sails the breezes swell . . .344

I am come back to my bower . . . .3i

I would I were a fairy, as light as falling snows . 36

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I go, sweet friends! yet think of me . . .* 40

It was a summer evening: . .. . .58

I would not be . , . . .74

I never cast a flower away . . . .94

I saw him'on the battle eve . . . .99

I made a mountain brook my guide . . .iI6

I will not call thee fair, Mary . .184

I'll tell thee the hour I love the best . . .I45

Is she not beautiful? reposing there . . . l6l

I look'd upon his brow—no sign . .i62

I climbed the dark brow of the mighty Helvellyn . i68

I loved thee, daughter of my heart . . . 20i

I do not love thee I—no! I do not love thee! . .24I

I bid thee to my mystic feast .... 243

I would I were the light fern growing . . . 246

I see a city of the East . . . . .247

In a brave old house dwells Magdalene . . 26I

I looked on the field where the battle was spread . 293

I love the land I . . . . . .297

I pray thee let me weep to night , . . 305

I saw thee wedded:—thou didst go . . 3I3

It is the spot I came to seek .... 342

List, ye who pass by Lyulph's tower . . .63

Like childhood making mirth of age . . .I05

Look on that flower—the daughter of the vale . ISO

Life and thought have gone away . . .I66
Lesbia hath a beaming eye .... 200

Long ago! oh, long ago! . . . .28I

Leave me, oh! leave me!—unto ail below . . 298

May's a word 'tis sweet to hear . .28

Man hath a weary pilgrimage . . . .42

Monarch, pictured here in state . . .50

My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains . 7I

Magnificent creature! so stately and bright . . 85

My native vale, my native vale . . . .i31

Morn on the waters I—and purple and bright . . I7#

My sweet one, my sweet one, the tears were in my

eyes - 205

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