Horace in the English Literature of the Eighteenth Century

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Yale University Press, 1918 - 641 páginas
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Página 417 - A perfect judge will read each work of wit With the same spirit that its author writ ; Survey the whole, nor seek slight faults to find Where nature moves, and rapture warms the mind ; Nor lose, for that malignant dull delight, The generous pleasure to be charm'd with wit.
Página 407 - Received his laws, and stood convinc'd 'twas fit, Who conquer'd nature, should preside o'er wit. Horace still charms with graceful negligence, And without method talks us into sense : Will, like a friend, familiarly convey The truest notions in the easiest way.
Página 264 - Whoever wishes to attain an English style, familiar but not coarse, and elegant but not ostentatious, must give his days and nights to the volumes of Addison...
Página 155 - NOT to admire, is all the art I know, To make men happy, and to keep them so.
Página 137 - But you who seek to give and merit fame, And justly bear a critic's noble name, Be sure yourself and your own reach to know, How far your genius, taste, and learning go; Launch not beyond your depth, but be discreet, And mark that point where sense and dulness meet.
Página 143 - Behold the child, by Nature's kindly law, Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw: Some livelier plaything gives his youth delight, A little louder, but as empty quite...
Página 418 - True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, As those move easiest who have learned to dance.
Página 487 - Vive, vale. Si quid novisti rectius istis Candidus imperti ; si non his utere mecum.
Página 421 - AWAKE, my St John ! leave all meaner things To low ambition, and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us and to die) Expatiate free o'er all this scene of Man ; A mighty maze ! but not without a plan ; A wild, where weeds and flowers promiscuous shoot ; Or garden, tempting with forbidden fruit.
Página 22 - Dictus et Amphion, Thebanae conditor urbis, saxa movere sono testudinis et prece blanda 395 ducere quo vellet. Fuit haec sapientia quondam, publica privatis secernere, sacra profanis, concubitu prohibere vago, dare iura maritis, oppida moliri, leges incidere ligno ; ' " ' ' sic honor et nomen divinis vatibus atque 400 carminibus venit.

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