The Angler's Companion to the Rivers & Lochs of Scotland

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H. Jenkins, 1923 - 320 páginas
 

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Página 73 - As an exercise, it is healthy, xnd just to the proper degree exciting. It braces the muscles, enlivens the spirits, gives rise to an agreeable alternation of hopes and fears, calls into activity the judgment as well as the fancy, the good taste and discrimination of the artist not less than his ideal and creative powers. It affords room, also, as has often been remarked, for the display of elegant motions and graceful attitudes; impersonations of earnestness and intense enthusiasm, of hope, of anxiety,...
Página 239 - Behold the Tiber," the vain Roman cried, Viewing the ample Tay from Baiglie's side ; But where's the Scot that would the vaunt repay, And hail the puny Tiber for the Tay ? * Anonymous.
Página 74 - Of hope increased, when he beholds, feeding within reach of his line, the monarch of the stream ? But now, mark him, he has dropt the hook cautiously and skilfully just above the indicated spot ; the fish, scarcely breaking the surface, has seized it. A fast, firm hold it has, but the tackle is fine, and the trout strong and active. Look ! how the expression of his features is undergoing a change. There is still hope, but mingled with it are traces of anxiety — of fear itself. His attitudes, too,...
Página 74 - ... of admiration and pity — of admiration as excited on contemplating the almost incomparable beauty of the captive, its breadth and depth, the harmony of its proportions, as well as the richness and variety of its colours — of pity, as called forth in accordance with our nature — an unconscious, uncontrollable emotion, which operates with subduing effect on the triumph of the moment. " And now, in their turn, content and thankfulness reign in the heart and develop themselves on the countenance...
Página 74 - Helpless and hopeless, it is drawn ashore, upturning, in the act of submission, its starred and gleamy flanks. The countenance of the captor — his movements (they are those which the soul dictates) are all joyous and selfcongratulatory. But the emotion, strongly depicted though it be, is short-lived. It gives way successively to the feelings of admiration and pity — of admiration as excited on contemplating the almost incomparable beauty of the captive, its breadth and depth, the harmony of its...
Página 153 - ... less relishable — of some ardent and kindred spirit, the sharer of my thoughts and felicity — give me, in such a place, and along with such an onlooker, the real sport of salmon-fishing — the rush of some veteran water-monarch, or the gambol and caracol of a plump new-run grilse, and talk no more of that monotonous and spiritless semblance of the pastime, which is followed by the affluent, among the dubs and dams of our border river.
Página 304 - Clyde, above its loftiest fall, which, being 80 feet in height, it is utterly impossible for fish of any kind to surmount. The fact is accounted for in this way. After passing Tinto Hill, the bed of the Clyde approaches to a level with that of the Biggar Water, which is close at hand, and discharges itself into the Tweed. On the occasion of a large flood the two streams become connected, and the Clyde actually pours a portion of its waters into one of the tributaries of the Tweed, which is accessible...
Página 304 - It is a singular circumstance that salmon and their fry have occasionally been taken in the upper parts of the Clyde, above its loftiest fall, which, being 80 feet in height, it is utterly impossible for fish of any kind to surmount. The fact is accounted for in this way. After passing Tinto Hill, the bed of the Clyde approaches to a level with that of the Biggar Water, which is close at hand, and discharges itself into the Tweed. On the occasion of a large flood the two streams become connected,...
Página 153 - Lot-hie or the Findhorn, full of breaks, runs, pools, and gorges— give me the waving birch-wood, the cliff and ivied scaur, tenanted by keen-eyed kestril or wary falcon — more than this, give me solitude, or the companionship — not less relishable— of some ardent and kindred spirit, the sharer of my thoughts and felicity — give me, in such a place, and along with such an onlooker, the real sport of salmon-fishing — the rush of some veteran...

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