Science and Religion, 400 B.C. to A.D. 1550: From Aristotle to Copernicus

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JHU Press, 2006 M03 10 - 307 páginas

Historian Edward Grant illuminates how today's scientific culture originated with the religious thinkers of the Middle Ages. In the early centuries of Christianity, Christians studied science and natural philosophy only to the extent that these subjects proved useful for a better understanding of the Christian faith, not to acquire knowledge for its own sake. However, with the influx of Greco-Arabic science and natural philosophy into Western Europe during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the Christian attitude toward science changed dramatically. Despite some tensions in the thirteenth century, the Church and its theologians became favorably disposed toward science and natural philosophy and used them extensively in their theological deliberations.

 

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Contenido

Introduction
1
Science and Natural Philosophy in the Roman
30
Christian
97
The Emergence of a New Europe after
137
The Medieval Universities and the Impact
165
The Interrelations between Natural Philosophy
191
Relations between Science and Religion in
225
Primary Sources
249
Saint Bonaventure On the Eternity of the World
257
Albert of Saxony Questions on Aristotles
265
Nicole Oresme Le Livre du ciel et du monde
271
Annotated Bibliography
279
Index
295
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Acerca del autor (2006)

Edward Grant is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History and Philosophy of Science at Indiana University, Bloomington. He is the author or editor of eleven books, including The Foundations of Modern Science in the Middle Ages (Cambridge University Press, 1996) and God and Reason in the Middle Ages (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

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