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LATINIZE

2. To give Latin terminations or forms to, as to foreign words. Terms and phrases that are latinized. JPatts. Latinize (lastin-iz), v.i. To use words or phrases borrowed from the Latin. I am liable to be charged that I latinize too much. Dryden. Latinlyt (la'tin-li), adv. ...So as to understand and write Latin; with purity of Latin style. Heylin. Lation? (lä'shon), n. [L. latio, lationis, from latum, used as the supine of fero, to bear.] The act of bearing or carrying from one place to another; transportation; translation. Latirostrous (lat-i-ros'trus), a... [L. latus, broad, and rostrum, beak..] Having a broad beak, as a fowl. Latiseptae (lat-i-sep’té), m. pl. [L. latus, broad, and septum, a hedge, a partition.] In bot. cruciferous plants having the dissepiment broad in proportion to the thickness between the valves. Latish (lāt'ish), a. Somewhat late. Latitancy (lā'ti-tan-si), m. [L. latitans, latitantis, ppr. of latito, to lie hid, from lateo. See LATENT.] The state of lying concealed; the state of lurking. Sir T. Browne. Latitant (lā'ti-tant), a. Lurking; lying hid; concealed; latent. Sir T. Browne. Latitat (lā'ti-tat), m. [L., he lurks.) A writ (now abolished), by which a person was summoned into the King's Bench to answer, as on the supposition that he lay concealed. Every power conferred by the law was therefore brought to bear upon them; some were served with notices to quit; sonne with processes for rent; some with a ol document called a latitat. ro". S. 7 revocot.

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wn. 2. Room; space; as, here there was little latitude for motion.—3. In astron, the distance of a star north or south of the ecliptic, measured on that secondary to the ecliptic which passes through the body. Secondaries to the ecliptic are called circles of celestial latitude, and parallels to the ecliptic are called ...}}.} celestial latitude.—4. In § the distance of any place on the globe north or south of the equator, measured on its meridian; any distance measured on a meridian; as, the ship sailed through 30° of latitude. It is called north or south according as the place is on the north or south side of the equator. The highest or greatest latitude is 90°, that is, at the poles. The latitude of a place is easily found, as, for instance, by measuring the altitude of the pole-star. See LoNGITUDE. The ancients supposed the torrid and the frigid zones to be uninhabitable and even impenetrable by man, but while the earth, as known to them, was bounded westwardly by the Atlantic Ocean, it extended indefinitely towards the east. The dimensions of the habitable world, then (and ancient geography embraced only the home of man, ; elsevairn), were much greater measured from west to east than from north to south. Accordingly, early geographers called the greater dimension, or the east and west line, the length, longitude, of the earth, the shorter dimension, or the north and south line, they denominated its breadth, latitude. G. P. Marsh. 5. Extent of meaning; wideness, comprehensiveness, or looseness of application; as, the words will not bear this latitude of construction. Then, in comes the benign latitude of the doctrine of good-will, and cuts asunder all those hard pinching cords. South. 6. Extent of deviation from a standard; freedom from rules or limits; laxity. In human actions, there are no degrees and precise natural limits described, but a latitude is indulged. Şer. Taylor. 7. Extent; size; amplitude; scope. I pretend not to treat of them in their full Matitude.

Ilocke. —Parallels of latitude, small circles parallel to the equator.—Difference of latitude of two places, the arc of the meridian inter“o: between their parallels of latitude. —Middle latitude sailing, a combination of plane and parallel sailing, so named from the use of the middle latitude; that is, the latitude of the parallel which is equally distant from the parallel left and the one arrived at. Latitudinal (lat-i-tūd'in-al), a. Pertaining to latitude; in the direction of latitude.

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latitudinaire.] 1. Embracing a wide circle or range; not confined by narrow limits; having a wide scope; free. Latudinarian love will be expensive, and therefore I would be informed what is to be gotten by it. Corrier. 2. Characterized by freedom, independence, or want of respect for the usual standards of belief or opinion; lax in o: principles or views; free-thinking; liberal; as, latitudinarian opinions or doctrines. Specifically, in Eng. hist. applied to a member of the Anglican Church who denied or doubted the divine right and the origin of Episcopacy. “Latitudinarian prelates, who had not been ashamed to correspond with Doddridge, and to shake hands with Whiston." Macaulay. Latitudinarian (lat’i-tūd-in-à"ri-an), n. 1. One who is liberal or not bigoted in his notions; one who has no respect for commonly accepted doctrines or opinions; specifically, in theol. one who departs in opinion from the strict principles of orthodoxy; or one who indulges a latitude of thinking and interpretation.—2. In the English Church, one who denies or doubts the divine right or origin of Episcopacy, though he admits its expediency: specifically applied to certain members of the church in the time of Charles II. They wished that things might have been carried with more moderation, and they continued to keep up a good correspondence with those who differed from them in opinion, and allowed a great freedom both in philosophy and in divinity; from whence they were called "men of latitude;’ and upon this, men of narrow thoughts fastened upon them the name of latitudinarians. Bp. Burnet. Latitudinarianism so. izm), n. Freedom or liberality of opinion, particularly in theology; laxity or indifference in regard to religious doctrines. Fierce sectarianism bred fierce latitudi. arrison. De Quincey. He (Ammonius Saccas) plunged into the wildest datitudinarianism of opinion, and availed himself of the great name of Plato in order to attach authority and importance to his pantheistic creed. 5. S. Harford. Latitudinous (lat-i-tūd'in-us), a. Having latitude or large extent. Laton,t n. [Sp.] Latten; a kind of mixed metal of the colour of brass. Chaucer. Latour (la-tor), n. A celebrated Bordeaux wine from Château Latour, between Julien and Pauillac. Latrantt (lā'trant), a. [See LATRATE.] Bark#only clamouring. ‘The latrant race.” Ticke

Latrate t (lā'trät), v. i. (L. latro, latratum, to bark.] To bark as a dog. Latration t_(la-trä'shon), n. A barking. Latreutical (la-trüt'ik-al), a. (Gr. latreud, to serve, to minister.] Acting in the capacity of a servant; ministering; relating to or constituted by latria. Bp. Hall. Latria (la-tri'a), n, [L., from Gr, latreia, service.] The highest kind of worship, or that paid to God: distinguished by Roman Catholics from dulia, or the inferior worship paid to saints. See DULIA. Latrine (la-trén'), n. [L. latrina, lavatrina, a bath, a water-closet, from lavo, to wash.) A privy; a water-closet. Latrobite (la-tröb'it), m. [From Latrobe, a personal name.] A pink or rose-red mineral allied to felspar, and occurring in indistinct crystals or massive, associated with felspar, mica, and calc-spar. Latrocination f(la-trö'si-nā"shon), n. [From L. latro, a robber.] The act of robbing; a depredation. Latrocinium t (la-trö-sin'i-um), n. [L.] 1. The prerogative of adjudging and executing thieves.—2. Larceny; theft. Latrociny to (latoró-si-ni), n. [L. latrocinium, robbery, from latro, a robber. See LARCENY.] Theft; larceny. Latten (lat’en), m. [Fr. laiton, Sp. laton, brass; It latta, tin-plate; probably kindred forms to E. lath, the name being given on account of the material being used in flat pieces or plates. See LATH.] 1. A fine kind of brass or bronze anciently used for crosses and candlesticks, brasses of sepulchral monuments, &c. The hau'boy not as now with latten bound. . 9onson. 2. As a modern commercial term, thin metal; metal in sheets or strips, especially sheet or plate brass or thin plates of mixed metal. Black latten, brass composed of copper and zinc in milled sheets, used by braziers, and for drawing into wire. —

Roll latten, latten polished on both sides ready for use. Simmonds.-3. Tin-plate. Latten-brass (lat’en-bras), n. Milled brass, reduced to different thicknesses, according to the uses the sheets are intended for. Latter (lat’ér), a. [An irregular comparative of late.] 1 Coming or happening after something else; more late or recent: opposed to former; as, the former and latter rain; former or latter harvest. Thus will this latter, as the former, world, Still tend from bad to worse. Milton. 2. Mentioned the last of two. The difference between reason and revelation– and in what sense the latter is superior. Joatri. 3. Modern; lately done or past; as, in these latter ages.

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other like net-work, so as to leave open interstices. It is only used when air rather than light is to be admitted. Such windows were once general in England. The mother of Sisera looked out at a window, and cried through the lattice. udg. v. 28. (b) A blind for a window constructed in a similar way.—3. In her. a bordure formed of perpendicular and horizontal bars, either interlaced or not. Lattice o v. t. pret. & pp. latticed; ppr. latticing. 1. To give the form or appearance of a lattice to.—2. To furnish with a lattice.—To lattice up, t to hide from the light of day; to render obscure; to eclipse. Alexander was adorned with most excellent virtues. . . . Therein he hath latticed up Caesar.

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LATTICE-LEAF

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LAURACEAE

Lattice-leaf. Lattice-plant (lat’is-lès, latis-plant). m. A very remarkable aquatic lant of Madagascar (Ouvirandra fenestrais), by some referred to the nat. order Juncaginaceae, by others to the Naiadaceae, and noteworthy for the structure of its leaves. The blade resembles lattice-work or open needle-work, the longitudinal ribs being

Lattice Plant (Ouvirandra fenestralis).

crossed by tendrils, and the interstices between them open. Written also Lace-leaf. Lattice-window (lat’is-win-dò), m. Same as Lattice, 2 (a). Lattice-work (lat’is-werk), n. Same as Lattice

, 1. Lauch (lach). Scotch form of Laugh. Laud (lad), n. [From L. laws, laudis, praise; from a root clu, seen also in L. clamare, W. clod, Ir. cloth, praise, fame; the tas has lost the initial guttural.] 1. Praise; commendation; an extolling in words; honourable mention. [Rare.] And give to dust, that is a little gilt, More laud than gilt o'er-dusted. Shak. 2. That part of divine worship which consists in praise.—3. Music, or a song in praise or honour of any one. She chanted snatches of old lauds. Johak. 4. pl. In the R. Cath. Ch. the second service of the day said after nocturns, and usually included in the term matins: so called because of the psalms of praise with which it concludes. Laud (lad), v.t. [L. laudo, to praise.] To in words alone, or with words and singing; to celebrate. Praise the Lord, all ye Gentiles; and laud him, all ye people. Rom. xv. 11. Laudability (lad-a-bil’i-ti), n. The quality of being laudable; laudableness. [Rare. Laudable (lad'a-bl), a. [L. laudabilis, from laudo, to praise. See LAUD.] 1. Praiseworthy; commendable; as, laudable motives; la le actions. By this laudable ambition the taste of the public is improved. Ir. Taylor. 2. Healthy; healthful; salubrious. “Laudable animal juices.” Arbuthnot. Laudableness (lad'a-bl-nes), n. The quality of being laudable; praiseworthiness; laudability; as, the laudableness of designs, purposes, motives, or actions. Laudably (lad'a-bli), adv. In a laudable In anner. Laudanum (lad'a-num), n. [From L. ladanum, the resinous juice obtained from the shrub lada. See LADANUM.] Opium prepared in spirit of wine by maceration, straining and filtering; tincture of opium. Dutchman's laudanum, the Passistora rubra, a plant which grows in Jamaica. The tincture of the flowers is used as a substitute for opium. Laudation (lad-ā'shon), n. Praise; commendation. Laudative (lad'ât-iv), n. [L. laudativus, from laudo, to praise. See LAUD.] A panegyric; a eulogy. [Rare.] I mean to make no panegyric or laudative. Bacon. Laudativet (lad'ât-iv), a. Laudatory. Bacon. Laudator (lad-āt’ér), n. 1. One who lauds; a lauder.—2. In law, an arbitrator. Laudatory (lad'a-to-ri), a. Containing or expressing praise; tending to praise. This psalm . . . is laudatory, setting forth and celebrating the power and greatness of God...for which he is to be praised. Udall. Laudatory (lad'a-to-ri), n. That which contains or expresses praise. A laudatory of itself obtruded in the very first word. Asulton.

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final consonantal sound has changed from guttural to labial in England—not in Scotland; compare in this respect enough, t h, &c.) 1. To make the noise and exhibit the features which are characteristic of mirth in the human species; to make that convulsive or chuckling noise which sudden merriment excites. –2. In poetry, to be gay; to appear gay, cheerful, pleasant, lively, or brilliant. Then laughs the childish year with flow'rets crown'd, Pryden. mo and lay down, an old game at cards, in which the winner laid down his cards and laughed, or was supposed to laugh, at his luck.--To laugh at, to ridicule; to treat with some degree of contempt. | No fool to lauoh at, which he valued more. Pope. —To laugh in the sleeve, to o privately, and so as not to be observed, especially when apparently maintaining a demure countenance: it generally implies some degree of contempt.—To .# out of the other side or corner of the mouth, to laugh on the wrong side of the mouth, to weep or cry; to be made to feel regret, vexation, or disappointment, especially after exhibiting a boastful or exultant spirit. The convulsion caused by merriment; an inarticulate expression of sudden mirth peculiar to man. But feigns a laugh, to see me search around, And by that laugh the willing fair is found. Pope. 1. To express by laughing. The large Achilles, on his pressed bed lolling, From his deep chest laughs out a loud appo

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lachen, to laugh. In pronunciation i

excite laughter; as, a laughable story; a laughable scene. Though men may bicker with the things they love, They would not make them laughable in all eyes. Tennyson. SYN. Risible, ridiculous, ludicrous, comical, droll, mirthful.

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2. A variety of Arabian pigeon, so named from its cry: it resembles the wild rockpigeon, but is smaller.

ide of nitrogen: so called because, when inhaled, it usually produces exhilaration.

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as, laughsome glee. läfter), n. [A. Sax: hleahtor; comp. Icelhlátr,0.H.G.hlahtar. See LAUGH.] An expression of mirth, manifested chiefly in certain convulsive and partly involuntary actions of the muscles of respiration, by means of which the air, being expelled from the chest in a series of jerks, produces a succession of short abrupt sounds, certain movements of the muscles of the face, and often of other parts of the body also taking place; also, any expression of merriment perceivable in the countenance, as in the eyes. Laughter is generally excited by things which are of aridiculous or ludicrous nature, the ultimate cause being usually attributed to the perception of some incongruity, though mere incongruity is not always sufficient. It may also be caused, especially in the young, by tickling; it also accompanies hysteria, and sometimes extreme grief. Without laughter; not laughing.

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Areae. 4. To put out into, or as into, another £fore of duty, another field of activity, or the like; as, to launch one on the world. Launch (länsh), v.i. 1. To move or glide forward, as a ship into the water. —2. To enter on another field of activity, another sphere of duty, or the like; as, to launch into the wide world. –3. To expatiate in language; as, to launch into a wide field of discussion. 1. hing into diversi Barrow.

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[Contr. from O.E. lavander, from Fr. lavandier, lavandière, from laver, L. lavo, to wash. 1 1. One who washes; a washerwoman. —2. A long trough used by miners to receive the powdered ore from the box where it is beaten. Launder (länder), v.t. ...To wash; to wet, glorino the silken figures in the brine.' k. Launderer (län'dér-ér), n. [See LAUNDER.] A man who follows the business of washing clothes. Laundress (län'dres), n. [Fem. form from launder (which see).] A female whose employment is to wash and dress clothes; a washerwoman. Laundress (län'dres), v.i. [From the noun.] To practise washing. Laundry (lan'dri), n. [Contr. for lavandery. See LaüNDER, nj 1. The act of washing; a washing. Bacon.—2. The place or room where clothes are washed and dressed.— 3. A launder or laundress. [Intentionally erroneous form.] There dwells one Mistress Quickly, which is in the manner of his nurse, or his dry nurse, or his cook, or his laundry. Shak undry-maid (län'dri-mâd), n. A female servant who attends the laundry. Laura (lara), n. (Gr. laura, an alley, lane, cloister; hence, a hermitage, a monastery.] Formerly, and especially in the Levant, a collection of cells or hermitages separated from each other, where the monks did not live in community, but each provided for himself, all being at the same time under one superior. Lauraceae (la-rá'sé-é), n. pl. (L. laurus, alaurel] A natural order of apetalous exogens, LAUREATE

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22

LAVER

consisting entirely of trees and shrubs, inhabiting the warmer parts of the world, and in most cases aromatic. They have insignificant flowers; the perianth is deeply cleft, four to ten lobed; the stamens are definite, and the fruit (a berry or drupe) is indehiscent; the two or four celled anthers open by recurved valves. Cinnamon, cassia, sassafras, and camphor are products of the order. The best known species is the Lawrus mobilis, or sweet-bay. Laureate (la'ré-āt), a. [L. laureatus, from laurea, a laurel.] Decked or invested with laurel. “Lawreate hearse.’ Milton. Soft on her lap her laureate son reclines. Pope. –Poet laureate, (a) in the English universities, one who received an honourable degree at a university for grammar, including poetry and rhetoric, so called from his being crowned with laurel. (b) In Great Britain, an officer ...; in virtue of his office to the royal household who was formerly required to compose an ode annually for the sovereign's birthday, for a great national victory, and the like—a requirement discontinued since the reign of George III., the post being now a sinecure. A tierce of canary was formerly part of the emoluments, but this has been changed to a money payment. Laureate (la'ré-āt), n. One crowned with laurel; a poet laureate. Alas! few verses touch their nicer ear, They scarce can bear their laureate twice a }. o

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a degree in a university, together with a

wreath of laurel—an honour formerly conferred for excellence in poetry and rhetoric.

On which occasions (i.e. taking degrees in gramo a wreath of laurel was presented to the new raduate, who was afterwards usually styled “poeta aureatus." These laitreation r, however, seem to have given rise to the appellation in question.

7. Ji'arton. Laurel (la'rel), m. [O.E. laurer, lorer, Fr. lawrier, Sp. Pr. laurel, L. laurus.] 1. A plant belonging to the genus urus, nat. order Lauraceae, to which it gives the name. The genus is distinguished by the leaves, which have a single midrib, and by the twelve stamens, all of which are fertile, with twocelled anthers, and two glands, one at each side. The sweet-bay or laurel (Laurus mobilis of Linn.) is a native of the north of Africa and south of Europe, and is cultivated in our gardens not only on account of its elegant appearance, but also for the aromatic fragrance of its evergreen leaves. The fruit, which is of a purple colour, and also the leaves, have long been used in medicine as stimulants and carminatives. The common or cherry laurel is Prunus laurocerasus, the spurge-laurel the Daphne Laureola. In ancient times, heroes and scholars were crowned with bay leaves and berries, whence the terms baccalaureus and laureate. Hence 2. (pl.) A crown of laurel; and figuratively honour; fame; distinction; as, to win laurols on the field of battle.—3. A gold coin of the reign of James I., struck in 1619, so called from the head of the king being crowned with laurel. See UNITE. Laurel (la'rel), a. Pertaining to or consisting of laurel; as, a laurel erown. Laurelled (la'reld), a. Crowned or decorated with laurel, or with a laurel wreath; laureate. * And thine the wheels of triumph, Which with their laurelled train,

Move slowly up the shouting streets. Macaulay, Laurel-water (la'rel-wa-tér), m. Water distilled from the leaves of the Prunus laurocerasus (the common or cherry laurel). It is

Sweet-bay (Laurus nobilis).

poisonous, the poisonous principle contained in it being prussic acid. | Laurencia (la-ren'si-a), m. A genus of algae, | having a solid cartilaginous, round or compressed, inarticulate, compound, pinnate or rarely forked frond, studded with ovate capsules opening by a terminal pore. L. pinmatifida is the well known pepper-dulse. | Laurenciaceae (la-ren'si-à"sé-é), m.pl. A nat. order of rose-spored algae, belonging to the series with tufted spore-threads. The genus Laurencia is the type. See LAURenCIA. Laurentian (la-ren'shi-an), a. In geol, a term applied to a vast series of stratified and crystalline rocks of gneiss, mica-schist, quartzite, serpentines and limestones, about 40,000 feet in thickness, discovered by Sir W. E. Logan northward of the St. Lawrence in Canada. The Laurentian is the lowest fossiliferous system of rocks. Its characteristic and only fossil is the Eozoom canadense (which see). Laureole,f n. Spurge-laurel. Laurer.f n. Laurel. Chaucer. Iaurestine (la'res-tin), n. Same as Laurus

Chaucer.

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1. Laurine (la'rin), n. (C2H300s.) An acrid, fatty, and bitter principle contained in the berries of the laurel. Laurus (la'rus), n. [L.] A genus of plants,

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rus-ti'nus), n. A plant, Viburnum Tinus, a popular garden evergreen shrub or tree, na

tive of the South of Europe. Lautu (lastü), n. [Peruv, llautu.] A band of cotton twisted and worn on the head of the Inca of Peru as a badge of royalty. Lava (lā’vä), n. [It, from L. lawo, to wash. The general term for all rock-matter that flows in a molten state from volcanoes, and which when cooled down forms varieties of tufa, trachyte, trachytic greenstone, and basalt, according to the varying proportions of felspar, hornblend, augite, &c., which enter into the composition of the mass, and according to the slowness or rapidity with which it has cooled. The more rapidly this process of cooling goes on the more compact is the rock.-Lava beds are of two kinds, namely, contemporaneous and intrusive. A contemporaneous lava bed is one which has been poured out over the surface of one deposit, and covered by subsequent deposits. , Such a bed is in its natural position, and usually alters only the bed beneath it. The toad-stone associated with the limestone strata of Derbyshire is an example of contemporaneous lava. , Intrusive beds are those which have been forced up in a molten state through or between strata, altering those on both sides. The sheets of dolerite occurring on Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh, are examples of intrusive lava beds.-Lava millstone, a hard and coarse basaltic millstone, obtained from uarries near Andernach on the Rhine. immonds.--Lava ware, a kind of coarse ware resembling lava made from iron slag, cast into urns, tiles, table-tops, &c. Lavandula (la-van'dú-la), n. [See LAVENDER.] A genus of perennial undershrubs and herbs, belonging to the nat. order Labiatae, natives of dry hilly places in the Mediterranean region, the Canary Islands, Madeira, &c. There are about twenty species, with entire or pinnatifid leaves, and long simple (or branched at the base) spikes of blue or violet nearly regular flowers, which are sometimes topped by large coloured bracts, as in L. stoechas. L. spica furnishes oil of spike, which, together with an oil from L. 8toe- Lavender (Lazandula chas, is employed by spira). painters on porcelain and in the preparation of varnishes for artists. L. vera, the lavender of commerce, furnishes oil of lavender. Lavender is tonic, stimulant, and carminative.

| Lavaret (lava ret), n. (Fr.] A fish of the salmon d, the gwyniad, Coregonus Penmantii (C. lavaretus, Linn.). | Lavatera (la-va-té'ra), n. [Named by De | Tournefort in honour of his friends the two Lavaters, famous physicians and naturalists of Zurich. J A #. containing about eighteen species of trees, shrubs, and annual and perennial herbs, natives of the temperate parts of the Old World and Australia, and belonging to the nat. order Malvaceae. It is readily distinguished from Malva by the three to six bracteoles, which are united at the base, forming an epicalyx. The species are tomentose or hairy plants, with lobed or angular leaves and often showy flowers, which are axillary and solitary or in terminal racemes. L. arborea, or sea tree-mallow, is a native of Britain, and grows on rocks near the sea. Lavatic (là-vat'ik), a. Consisting of or re| sembling lava; lavic. Lavation (la-vá'shon), n. lavo.] A washing or cleansing. Lavatory (la’va-to-ri), a. W sing by washing. Lavatory (la’va-to-ri), n. [See LAVE.] 1. A room or place for washing.—2. A wash or lotion for a diseased part.—3. A place where gold is obtained by washing. Lavaturet (la’va-tūr), n. A wash or lotion. Holland. Lave (lāv), v. t. pret. & pp. laved; ppr. laving. [Fr. laver, L. lavo, to wash, to bathe; akin to Gr. loud, to wash..] To wash; to bathe. ‘To lave her dainty hands." Shak. | “Whose walls the silent waterslave." Parnell. Lave (lāv), v.i. 1. To wash one's self; to bathe. Ever since I heedlessly did lave In thy deceitful stream. Aeats. 2. To wash, as the sea, on the beach or at the base of a rock. These waters blue that round you lave. Byron. Lave (lāv), v.t. [A. Sax. lasian, to sprinkle water, allied to L. lavo, to wash, and probably to Icel. laug, a bath.] 1. To throw up or out, as water from any receptacle; to lade out; to bale. A fourth with labour razer The intruding seas, and waves ejects on waves, Prydent.

[L. lavatio, from Hakewill. or clean

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), a. to impiappet; G too, 'lar, the biade of an oar, the shoulder-blade. Comp. also W. llaf, that extends or goes round.] Having large pendent ears. “A lave-eared asse.” Bp. Hall. Laveert (la-vér'), v.t. [D. laveren, to tack.] Naut, to sail back and forth; to tack. Lavement,t n. [See LAVE, to wash.] 1. The act of laving; a washing or bathing.—2. A clyster. Lavender, t n. [See LAUNDER.] A washerwoman or laundress. Chaucer. Lavender (la’ven-dér), n. [L.L. lavendula, lavandula, It lavandola, lavanda, Fr. lavande, G. lavandel, lavender, from L. lavo, to wash—in allusion to the use made of its distilled water.]. 1. An aromatic plant of the genus Lavandula (which see).-2. A pale blue colour with a slight mixture of y. —To lay in lavender, to lay by carefully, as clothes, with sprigs of lavender among them; hence, to put in pledge; to pawn. Good faith, rather than thou shouldst pawn a rag more, I'll lay my ladyship in lavender, if I knew where. Eastward Hoe (1605). Lavender-cotton (la’ven-dér-kot-n), n. The common name of plants of the genus Santolina, nat. order Compositae, which possesses anthelmintic properties. The common lavender-cotton (S. Chamaecyparissus) is one of the most widely-spread species, and it long been known in gardens. It is a neat erect branching bush, 1 to 2 feet high, the stems and leaves clothed with a hoary pubescence. Lavender-thrift (la’ven-dér-thrift), n. A plant of the genus Statice, nat. order Plumbaginaceae, the S. limonium. Lavender-water (la’ven-dér-wa-tér), m. A liquor, used as a perfume, composed of spirits of wine, essential oil of lavender, and ambergris. Laver (lā’vér), n. [From E. lave, L. lavo, to wash..] 1. A vessel for washing; a large basin; in Scrip. hist, a basin placed in the LAVER

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court of the Jewish tabernacle, where the officiating priests washed their hands and feet, and the entrails of victims. That spirit moves In the green valley, where the silver brook, From its full laver, pours the white cascade. Longfellow. 2 t One who laves or washes; a washer. Huloet. Laver (lā'vér), n. [From L. lavo, to wash.) A name given to two species of algae of the genus Porphyra, P. laciniata and P. vulgaris. They are employed as food, salted, eaten with pepper, vinegar, and oil; and are said to be useful in scrofulous affections and glandular tumours. Green laver is the Ulva latissima. It also is employed as food, stewed and seasoned with lemon-juice, and is ordered for scrofulous patients. Called also Sloke or Sloakan. Laver-bread (lā’vér-bred), n. A sort of food made from greenlaver (Ulva latissima): sometimes called Oyster-green. Laverock (lā’vér-ok). See LARK. Laverwort (lā'vér-wért), n. A species of algae, same as Laver. Lavic (lāovik), a. Relating to or like lava. Lavish (lav’ish), a. [An irregularly formed word from E. lave, to pour out, to flow. See LAVE, to throw out water.] 1. Expending or bestowing with profusion; profuse; as, he was lavish of expense; lavish of praise; larish of blood and treasure. She, of her favourite place the pride and joy, rms at once most lavish and most coy.

Crabbe. 3. Expending without necessity or foolishly; liberal to a fault; wasteful; as, lavish of money.—3. Wild; unrestrained. “Curbing his lavish spirit." Shak. —4. Expended, or bestowed with prodigality or in profusion; existing in profusion; superabundant; superfluous. Let her have needful, but not lavish, means. A. wiaz. See where the winding vale its lavish stores Irriguous spreads. 7Tocorror. SYN. Prodigal, wasteful, profuse, extravagant, exuberant, immoderate. Lavish.(lav'ish), c.t. 1. To expend or bestow with profusion; as, to lavish encomiums. Even as a war minister. Pitt is scarcely entitled to all the praise which his contemporaries lavished on -ol. Macaulay. 2. To expend without necessity or use; to waste; to squander; as, to lavish money on vices and amusements. Lavisher (lav'ish-er), n. One who lavishes; one who expends or bestows profusely or excessively; a prodigal. God is not a latither, but a dispenser, of his blessings. Fotheröy. La (lav'ish-li), adv. In a lavish manner: with profuse expense; prodigally; wastefully. Tributary gifts were poured lavifhly at his sect.

Aft/man. Lavishment (lav'ish-ment), n. The act of being lavish; the state of being lavish; prodigality; profuse expenditure. vishness (lav'ish-nes), n. The state or quality of being lavish; profusion; prodigality. lost, Lavolta (la-vält', la-völt'a), n. [It. la volta, the turn...] An old dance in which was much turning and capering. It was popular in the time of Queen Elizabeth, and was probably not unlike the modern polka. I cannot sing, Nor heel the high latest. Shak. They bid us to the English dancing schools, And teach Zazoltar high, and swift corantos. Shak. Lavoltateert (la-vol'ta-tér), n. One who dances the lavolta; a dancer. “A lavoltateer, a saltatory, a dancer." Beau. d: Fl. Lavoures,t m. pl. Lavers. Chaucer. Law (la), n. (A Sax. lagu, from same root as lie and lay (see LAY, LIE); cog. Sw, lag, Icel. tag, log, Dam. lov, a law. The same root is also in L. ler, a law. (See also Low.) The word corresponds in radical meaning to G. gesetz, law, from setzen, to place; Gr. thesmos, from root of tithemi, to place, and L. statutum, a statute.] 1. A rule of action or conduct laid down or prescribed by authority; an edict of a ruler or a government; an expressed command; a decree; an order. Our human Zazzo are but the copies, more or less imperfect. of the e-ternal law; so far as we can read them, and either succeed and promote our welfare, or fail and bring confusion and disaster, according as the legislator's insight has detected the true o: ple, or has been distorted by ignorance or selfishness. 9. A. Froude. 2. In a collective sense, the appointed rules of a community or state for the control of

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its inhabitants, whether unwritten, as the common law of England, or enacted by formal statute. And sovereign Law, that state's collected will, O'er thrones and globes elate. Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill. Sir Jo. 3 oner. 3. One of the rules or principles by which anything is regulated; as, the laws of the turf; the laws of versification.—4. The proposition which expresses the constant or regular order according to which an energy or agent operates; the proposition expressive of the uniform methods or relations according to which material and mental forces act in producing effects, or are manifested in phenomena; a theoretical principle deduced from practice or observation; as, the law of gravitation; a geological law; the laws of physical descent; the law of selfpreservation.—5. In math, a rule according to which anything, as the change of value of a variable, or the value of the terms of a series, proceeds; mode of sequence.—6. In theol. a term variously used. In the Bible it often includes the whole of revelation, doctrinal as well as preceptive; but it is often also used, in a more restricted sense, to signify the books of Moses, the whole Jewish scriptures being comprehended under the designation ‘the law and the prophets." A very common use of the term is to denote the preceptive part of revelation in contradistinction to the doctrinal, the one part being called the law, and the other the gospel. . When employed in Scripture with exclusive reference to the preceptive part of revelation, the term law sometimes signifies the Jewish code of precepts as to rites and ceremonies, called the ceremonial law, and which is regarded as having been abrogated when the Jewish dispensation gave place to the Christian.—7. The reference of a dispute to judicial decision; the adoption of the steps necessary to bring a disputed point before a tribunal for de; judicial process; litigation; as, to go and

Tom Touchy is a fellow famous for taking the larv of everybody. Addison. 8. The whole body of legal enactments and writings pertaining to them; legal science; jurisprudence; as, to study law; to practise law. Law of the land, the general, public, or common law of the land; due W. of law.—Wager of law. See under AGER.—Law French, the Norman dialect, or old French, used in all legal proceedings from the time of William the Conqueror to that of Edward III., and still employed in certain formal state proceedings.--Law language, the language used in legal writings and forms.-Law Latin, corrupt Latin used in law and legal documents. See CANONLAW, and under CIVIL, COMMERCIAL, COMMON, CRIMINAL, ECCLESIASTICAL, INTERNATIONAL, MARITIME, MARTIAL, MoRAL, Mosaic, MUNICIPAL, Positive, STATUTE. Law (la), n. [A. Sax. hlaw, hlaw, a rising ound, a small hill, a grave-mound.) A mill; a hillock; a mound. [Scotch..] Law, Laws (la, las), interj. . [A corruption of ori: or same as la () An exclamation common among uneducated people, and expressing wonder or surprise. Law, Lawe (la), v. t. [Because this cruel operation was performed in order to comply with the forest law for the protection of the king's game.] To cut off the claws and balls of, as of a dog's forefeet; to mutilate the feet of, as a dog; to expeditate. Law, t Lawe, ta. Low. Chaucer. Law-abi (la'a-bid-ing), a. Observant of the law; obeying the law; as, law-abiding

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Thou art a robber, A law-breaker, a villain. Snazzo. Law-burrows (latu-rūz), n. In Scots law, a writ or document in the name of the sovereign, commanding a person to give security against offering violence to another. The person applying for the letters must swear to the truth of some cause of alarm, such as actual personal violence or threats of violence. Law-calf (la'kāf), n. See LAw-biNDING.

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2. Constituted or supported by law; right ful; as, the lawful owner of lands. ‘England's lawsul king.” Shak. —SYN. Legal, constitutional, allowable, regular, rightful. Lawfully (la'ful-li), adv. In a lawful manner; in accordance with law; without violating law; legally; as, we may lawfully do what the laws do not forbid. This bond is forfeit: And ... by this the Jew may claim

A pound of flesh. Shao Lawfulness (la'ful-nes), n. The quality of being lawful or conformable to law; legality; as, the lawfulness of an action does not

always prove its propriety or expedience. Lawgiver (la'giv-ér), m. One who makes

or enacts a law; a legislator. Lawgiving (la'giv-ing), a. Making or enacting laws; legislative. Lawgiving heroes, fam'd for taming brutes, And raising cities with their charming lutes. if a.o.er.

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Law-list (la'list), n. A published list of all the persons, as judges, barristers, conveyancers, draughtsmen, special pleaders, solicitors, attorneys, connected with the profession of the law in a country. Law-lore (la'lór), n. Learning in respect to ancient laws; knowledge of law and legal history. Law-maker (la'māk-er), n. One who enacts or ordains laws; a legislator; a lawgiver. Law- (la'mäk-ing), a. Enacting laws. Law-merchant (la'mér-chant), n. Commercial law; a system of rules by which trade and commerce are regulated. Lawmonger (la'mung-gēr), n. A low practitioner of law; a pettifogger. Though this chattering lawmanger be bold to call it wicked. Milton. Lawn (lan), n. [O.E. laund, lawmde, a clear space in a forest, a wild shrubby or woody track (see LAUND), from W. llan, an inclosed space, or from French word of kindred origin. See LAND..] 1. An open space between woods; a glade in a forest.— 2. A space of ground covered with grass, and kept smoothly mown, generally in front of or around a mansion.—3. [Because from its fineness it was bleached on a lawn or smooth grassy sward. J A sort of fine linen or cambric. Its use in the sleeves and some other parts of the dress of bishops explains the following line and similar allusions— A saint in crape is twice a saint in lawn. Pope.

Lawn (lan), a. Made of lawn.

Lawndt (land), n. See LAUND.

Lawn-mower (lan'mô-ár), n. One who or that which mows a lawn; specifically, a machine for cutting sward. A usual form of lawn-mower consists of a revolving cylinder, armed with spiral knives which rotate in contact with the rectilinear edge of a stationary knife placed tangentially to them.

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spiral and stationary knives, is cut off, and delivered into a box beside the cylinder. Lawn-sleeve (lan'slév), n. A sleeve made of lawn; a part of a bishop's dress. Lawn-sleeved (lan'slévd), a. Having lawnsleeves. Lawn-tennis (lan'ten-nis), n. An outdoor game played on a lawn and resembling tennis. The players are separated from each other by a low netting, and strike a tennis ball towards each other by means of bats resembling tennis rackets. Lawmy (lan'i), a. Level, as a plain: like a lawn. ‘The lawny ground.’ Sir T. Browne. Lawny (lan'i), a., Made of lawn. Law-officer(la'of-fis-er), n. An officer vested with legal authority. Lawsonia (la-să'ni-a), n. [In honour of Isaac Lawson, M.D., author of A Voyage to Carolina.] A genus of plants belonging to the nat. order Lythraceae, containing only one species (L. alba), which is widely cultivated, especially in oriental regions. It is the plant from which the henné or henna is obtained with which Asiatic women dye their nails and the tips of their fingers of an orange hue. The men also dye their beards with it, the orange colour being afterward converted into a deep black by the application of indigo. It is a tall, slender shrub, with a profusion of small white fragrant flowers; it is sometimes spiny, and in this state has been described under the name of L. spinosa; when without spines it has been called L. inermis. See HENNA. Law-stationer (la'stá-shon-èr), n. A stationer who keeps on sale the articles reuired by lawyers, such as parchment, tape, oolscap, brief paper, &c.; one who takes in drafts or writings to be fairly copied for lawyers. Lawsuit (la'sút), n. [See SUIT.] . A suit in law for the recovery of a supposed right; a process in law instituted by a party to compel another to do him justice. Law-writer (la'rit-ér), n. An engrosser; a clerk employed by a law-stationer to make copies of briefs, deeds, cases, &c., in a round legible hand. Lawyer (layer), n. [From law. Comp. bowyer, sawyer.j 1. One versed in the laws, or a practitioner of law; one whose profession is to institute suits in courts of law, or to prosecute or defend the cause of clients. This is a general term, comprehending attorneys, counsellors, solicitors, barristers, serjeants, and advocates.—2. A name given in America to the Himantopus nigricollis, or black-necked stilt, a bird which frequents the American shores. Lawyer-like, Lawyerly (la'yèr-lik, la'yèrli), a. Like a lawyer. Lax ), a. [L. lazus, loose..] 1. Loose; flabby; soft; not tense, firm, or rigid; as, laz flesh; a laz fibre.—2. Slack; not tightly stretched or drawn; as, a lar cord.—3.t Of loose texture; as, ‘gravel and the like lazer matter.” Woodward.—4. Sparse; not crowded; as, laz foliage. [Rare.]-5. Not rigidly exact or precise; vague; equivocal. .The word ‘aeternus' itself is sometimes of a lax signification. 9 ortin. : 6. Not sufficiently strict or rigorous; loose; as, laz discipline; laz morals; law principles. He was lax and lawless in his loves, and had a dangerous name in the country side among the mothers of maidens. Outda. 7. Loose in the intestines, and having too frequent discharges. – SYN. Loose, slack, vague, unconfined, unrestrained, dissolute, licentious, Lax(laks), n. A looseness; diarrhoea. Laxt (laks), n. [A. Sax. leaz, Sc. Icel D. lar, Dan. laks, G. , a salmon.] A species of fish; a salmon. Laxatif, t n, . A laxative. Chaucer. Laxation (laks-à'shon), n. [L. lazatio, laza

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tionis, from lazo, to make loose, to expand. See LAx.] The act of loosening or slackening; or the state of being loose or slackened. Laxative (laks'a-tiv), a. [Fr. lazatis, from L. lazo, lazatum, to make loose; to expand.] Having the power or quality of loosening or opening the intestines, and relieving from constipation. Laxative (laks'a-tiv), n. A medicine that relaxes the intestines and relieves from costiveness; a gentle purgative. Laxativeness (laks'a-tiv-nes), n. The quality of relaxing. Laxator (laks'ât-ér), n. [L. lazo, laratum, to loose.] That which loosens Lazator tympani, a muscle which relaxes the tympanic membrane by drawing forward the handle of the malleus. Laxity (laks'i-ti), n. [L. laritas, from lazus, loose. The state or quality of being lax: (a) looseness; slackness: the opposite of tenseness or tension. (b) Looseness of texture. ‘So great a laxity and thinness.' Bentley. (c) Want of exactness or preci. sion. ‘Ease and lazity of expression.' Johnson. (d) Dissoluteness; want of due strictness; as, lazity of morals. (e) Looseness, as of the intestines: the opposite of costiveness. % Openness: opposite of closeness. “The larity of the channel in which it flows.' Digby. [Rare.] Laxly (laks'li), adv. In a laxmanner; loosely; without exactness. Laxness (laks'nes), n. Same as Lazity. Lay (lā), pret. of lie. Lay (lā), v.t, pret & pp. laid: ppr. laying. [A. Sax. lecyan, pret largde, lede, o gelaegd, !. a causal corresponding to lie, A. Sax. icgan. Comp. Goth, lagjan, Icel. leggja, to lay; Goth. ligan, Icel. liggja, to lie; Dan. lagge, G. legen, to lay.] I. To place in a lying position; to place so as to have a large surface in contact with something; as, to lay a log on the ground; to lay a measuringrod to a wall: differing from set, which means properly to place in a sitting or erect position; thus, we lay a book on the table when we place it on its side, but we set it on end. A stone was brought, and laid upon the mouth of e den. Dan. vi. 17. 2. To cause something standing to lie flat; to beat down; to prostrate; as, violent winds with rain lay corn and grass. Shall we knit our powers And lay this Angiers even with the ground? Shak. 3. To put or place in general; to impose; to apply; to rest; as, to lay one's hand on the table; to lay a tax on land; to lay blame on one; to lay commands on one ; to lay claim to. Nay, never lay thy hand upon thy sword. Shak. The Lord hath laid on him the iniquity o: us all,

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She layeth her hands to the spindle. Prov. xxxi. 19. Lay not that flattering unction to your soul. Shak.

Rarely with into. is . . . all my armour laid into my tent? Shak. 4. To bring into a certain state: with various adjectives; as, to lay bare; to lay open.— 5. To settle; to fix and keep from rising; to still; to allay; to cause to disappear; as, a shower lays the dust; to lay a ghost. “To lay this wind.” Shak. The husband found no charm to lay the devil.

Sir R. L'Estrange. 6. To dispose with regularity in building; as, to lay bricks or stones in constructing walls. 7. To spread on a surface; as, to lay plaster. 8. To place in the earth for growth. The chief time of laying gillyflowers is in July. Asortiorter. 9. To place at hazard; to wager; to stake; as, to lay a crown or a guinea. I dare lay mine honour he will remain so. Shak. 10. To produce or bring forth; as, to lay eggs. 11. To add ; to join. Woe unto them that join house to house, that lay field to field. Is. v. 8. 12. To contrive; to scheme; to plan; as, to

lay a plot.—13. In law, (a) to prefer or bring

before a court of justice; as, to lay an indictment. (b) To allege; to state; as, to lay the venue; to lay damages.—To lay a cable or rope, to twist or unite the strands.--To lay along, t to prostrate. In one place the walls of cities are laid along. Hoodarod. The leaders first he laid along. Dryden. —To lay apart, to put away; to reject. Lay apart all filthiness. Jam. i. 21.

LAY

—To lay aside, to put off or away; not to retain; to abandon. Let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us. Heb. xii. 1. –To lay away, to reposit in store; to put aside for preservation.—To lay before, to exhibit; to show ; to present; to view; as, the papers are laid before Parliament.— To lay by, (a) to reserve for future use. Let every one of you say by him in store, as God hath prospered him. 1 Cor. xvi. 2. (b) + To put away; to dismiss. Let brave spirits not be laid by as persons unne

cessary for the time. n.

(c) To put off. And she arose and went away, and laid oy her

vei Gen. xxxviii. 19.

il. –To lay by the heels, to put in the stocks. Shak.; hence, to confine; to put into prison. –To lay down, (a) to give up; to resign; to quit or relinquish; as, to lay down an office or commission. I lay down my life for the sheep. Jn. x. 15. % To offer or advance; to declare; as, to a y down a proposition or principle; to lay down the law. [The latter phrase is often used in the sense of to behave dictatorially.] (c) To delineate on paper; as, to lay down a chart of a shore or sea; to lay down a plan. (d) To stake, or deposit as a pledge, equivalent, or satisfaction.— To lay one's self down, to lie down. — To lay hold of, to lay hold on, to seize; to catch.--To lay in, (a) to store; to treasure; to provide breviously; as, to lay in provisions. , (b) To ut in; to enter; as, to lay in a claim.— To lay off or lay down, in ship-building, to transfer the plans of a ship from the paper to the full size on the floor of the moulding-loft.—To lay it on, to do anything to excess, as to be lavish in expenditure, or to charge an exorbitant price. My father hath made her mistress of the feast, and she days it cos. Shać. To lay on, (a) to apply with force; to inflict; as, to lay on blows. (b) To supply, as water, gas, &c., to houses by means of pipes leading from a main reservoir: sometimes used figuratively in this sense. The labours of others have raised for us an immense reservoir of important facts. We merely say them on, and communicate them in a clear and gentle stream . . to a world thirsting for knowledge. Dickens. –To lay one's self forth,t to exert one's self vigorously or earnestly. - To lay one's self open to, to expose one's self to. To lay one's self out for, to be ready to take part in; to be given to indulge in.--To lay one's hand on a thing, to find a thing when wanted: used both literally and metaphorically.—To lay open, to open; to make bare; to uncover; also, to show; to expose; to reveal; as, to lay open the designs of an enemy. — To lay over, to spread over; to incrust; to cover the surface; as, to lay over with gold or silver.—To lay out, (a) to expend; as, to lay out money, or sums of money. The blood and treasure that's laid out Is thrown away. Hudibras. (b) + To display; to show or exhibit. He was dangerous, and takes occasion to lay cut bigotry and false confidence in all its colours Atterbury. (c) To plan; to dispose in order the several arts; as, to lay out a garden. (d) To dress in grave-clothes and place in a decent posture; as, to lay out a corpse. [Shakspere uses to lay forth.] (e) To exert; as, to lay out all one's strength.--To lay to, (a) to apply with vigour. 1ay to your fingers; help to bear this away. Shao. (b) #To attack or harass. (c) To check the motion of a ship and cause her to be stationary.--To lay to heart, to consider seriously and intently; to feel deeply or keenly. –To lay to one's charge, to accuse a person of.--To lay up, (a) to store; to treasure; to reposit for future use. Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven. Mat. vi. 20. (b) To confine to the bed or chamber; as, he is laid up with the gout. (c) Naut. to dismantle, as a ship, and put in a dock or other place of security. — To lay siege to, (q) to besiege; to encompass with an army. (b) To importune; to annoy with constant solicitations To lay wait, to station for private attack; to lie in ambush for. To lay the course, in sailing, is to sail toward the port intended without tacking. To lay waste, to destroy; to desolate; to deprive of inhabitants, improvements, and productions.

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