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river and in interviews with the Indians, they finally, on the 27th of March, pitched upon a spot of land on a branch of the Potomac, on the north side, for a settlement, and called the place “Saint Maries." This was the beginning of the Catholic colony of Maryland. The letters which form the basis of the first Maryland tract, (1634,) whose title-page is given above, were dated " From Saint Maries in Mary. land, 27 May, 1634.” These letters also form the basis of that part of the Relation of 1635 which is included in pages 3 to 16. It is not an improbable supposition, that these letters were written by the distinguished brothers of Lord Baltimore.

We trust that Mr. Sabin will be encouraged to proceed with his series of reprints. The scarcity of the originals prevents many students from access to these authorities for our early history. As historical libraries increase in the newer portions of our country, the value of such reprints will become continually greater.

We purpose to remark at a future time on some of the other tracts already published.

24. — Melodies and Madrigals, mostly from the old English Poets.

Edited by RICHARD HENRY STODDARD. New York : Bunce and Huntington. 1866. Small 4to. pp. xviii., 206.

This is a charming little volume, both for its good looks and for what is in it. Mr. Stoddard. has made his selections with great good taste, and by judiciously confining himself to a certain line of subjects has been able to give us something more complete and harmonious in tone than such selections are apt to be. We can cordially recommend it to any one under the painful necessity of making a present and not knowing what to give.

Cambridge : Stereotyped and Printed by Welch, Bigelow, & Co.

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Alexander, C. F., her Sunday Book of

Poetry, critical notice of, 315, 316.
Allingham, William, his Ballad Book, criti-

cal notice of, 316 - 318.
Art in America, The Conditions of, article

on, 1- 24 — the indifference of Ameri-
cans to art, 1-7 — their appreciation
of poetry and music, 2- ignorance of
architecture, 4, 5 — conditions necessary
to high achievements in art, 7 — best
American genius not devoted to art, 8
- importance of art in educating the
people, 10, 11 - signs of change in pub-
lic mind toward art, 11 - art not de-
pendent on forms of government, 18, 14
– inadequateness of current criticism,
3, 4, 15 — distinction between “natural-
ism" and "realism," 16, 17 - definition
of " idealism," 17, 18 — artists must use
a language understood by the people,
18-20 — nature and importance of im-
agination, 21, 22 – duty of the public
to art, 23 – duty of artists in respect to

criticism, 23, 24.
Bigelow, Jacob, his Address on the Limits

of Education, critical notice of, 592 -

598.
Bowles, Samuel, his Across the Continent,

critical notice of, 619-623.
Brougham, Lord, his treatise on the Eng-

lish Constitution referred to, 331.
Buchanan, Robert, his Poems, critical

notice of, 555, 556.
Burke, Edmund, Vols. III. and IV. of re-

vised edition of his works, critical notice

of, 634-637.
Bushnell, Horace, his Vicarious Sacrifice,

critical notice of, 556-571.
Carey, Henry C., his Currency Question

referred to, 115 - 119.
Carlyle, Thomas, his Frederick the Great,

article on, 419 – 445 - elements neces-
sary for literary immortality, 419 – 422

present demand for sensations, 422, 423
- leading characteristics of Carlyle's

earliest works, 424 – 426 -- influence of
Richter visible in Sartor Resartus, 426,
427 — merits and defects of Critical
Essays and French Revolution, 427
Carlyle possesses a vigorous conceptive
imagination, but is not an artist, 428
invents the Hero-cure, 429 — his irrita-
bility possibly due to his having been a
schoolmaster, 430, 431 — his cant, 432 —
his cynicism, 433, 437 — his defects as
an historian, 433, 434 – striking quali-
ties of his histories, 435, 436 – a de-
nouncer of shams, gradually becoming
very like a sham, 438-440 — loyalty of
mankind to a natural leader, 441
character of Friedrich, 441 - 444.
Character, article on, 356 - 373 — defini-

tion of morals, 356, 357 — the moral
element universal, 357 – omnipotent,
359 — is the truth, 360 -- possessed in
unusual fulness by occasional men,
361, 362 — the judge and measure of
religions, 363 — changes in popular esti-
mate of systems of religion, 363 – 366 –
religion original, not imported, 367
present position of churches, clergy,
and creeds, 368 – 370 - inspiration per-
petual, 370 — character superior to acci-

dents, 372 — its sufficiency, 373.
Children's Books of the Year, article on,

236 – 249 — Catholic literary taste of
children, 237 — books, once enchant-
ing, now obsolete, 238, 239 — difference
between former and recent boy-heroes,
240- characteristics of Mayne Reid's
and Mr. Kingston's stories, 241 -excel-
lence of “ Carleton's," 241 — merits and
defects of Mr. Trowbridge's, Miss Ash-

Mr. Alger's, 242-genius of " Lit-
tle Prudy Stories," 243 — illustrations of
some recent children's books, 244 -
value and charm of "The Flower Peo-
ple,” “Seven Little Sisters," " Studies
for the Seaside," and "Boys at Che-
quasset," 245 – practical juvenile books,
Jacob Abbott's, their genuine worth, 246,
247 — popularity of * Oliver Optic's '

ford's,

several series, 248 - our children's books
more national than others, 248, 249.
Clark, Henry James, his Mind in Nature,

critical notice of, 627 - 630.
Clay, Henry, article on, 147 – 194 — his

wonderful popularity, 147, 148 — his
cultivation of it, 149, 150 -- education
and life at Richmond, 151, 152 — influ-
ence of Chancellor Wythe, 153, 154-
cultivation of oratory, 154-156 — studies
law and commences practice at Lexing-
ton, Ky., 157 — his speedy success, and
its causes, 158 — enters politics, 159 -
popular habits, 160 - elected U.S. Sen-
ator, 161 — supports President Jeffer-
son's policy, 161-163 - elected Speaker
of House of Representatives, 164 — re-
sponsible for war of 1812, 164 - 166
not the interest of American politicians
to promote war, 167, 168 — champion of
"American System," 169-171 -- social
habits while Speaker, 172-his connec-
tion with the Missouri Compromise, 173
- 175 — his rare felicitousness on occa-
sions of ceremony, 175 — his twenty-
four years' candidature for Presidency,
176 — friendly relations with Jackson,
177 — changed by his opposition to
Jackson's conduct of Florida war, 178,
179 — by his favoring John Quincy
Adams for President, 180, 181 – Secre-
tary of State, and his duel with John
Randolph, 181, 182 — life at Ashland,
182 - Jackson's efforts to injure him,
183, 184–Senator again, 185 — mistakes
in leadership, 185 – 188

his narrow
views concerning slavery, 189, 190
his devotion to the Union, 191, 192
his oratory, statesmanship, and personal

character, 193, 194.
Climatic Influences as bearing upon Se-

cession and Reconstruction, article on,
24 - 47 — inadequacy of current theories
of the cause of secession, 24 — slavery
not the prime cause, 25 — why the
South advocated Free Trade and State
Rights, 26 — slavery abolished in North-
ern States because unprofitable, 27 –
fertile soil and genial climate made
Southern States agricultural, sterile soil
and cold climate made Northern States
commercial and manufacturing, 27, 28

- agriculture tends to produce an aris-
tocracy, 29 — to repress intellectual ac-
tivity, 30 — to accumulate landed prop-
erty in hands of sew, 32, 33 — direct
influence of climate on social conditions,
34 - 36 — doctrine of State Rights harm-
less as a theory, powerful for evil only
* from causes produced by climatic influ-
ences, 36 — inanufactures, a remedy for
social tendencies produced by climate
of Southern States, 38 — never generally
established at South on account of
hostile public sentiment, 39 -
erful competition of North, by greater
capital and prior establishment, 40-42 -
Southern States should be permitted to

protect their manufactures by a tariff,
for a series of years, 43, 44 - necessity
of possession of suffrage by the negro
for self-protection and the preservation
of democratic institutions at the South,

45-47.
Cobden, Richard, on international arbitra.

tion, 479.
Courts of Conciliation, article on, 135 - 146

established in Denmark in 1795, 136
their constitution, 136 — service on
them compulsory, sessions secret, extent
of their jurisdiction, 187 -- mode of pro-
cedure in them, 137 - 139 — theory un-
derlying them, 140 — different character
of French system, 141— success of
Danish system, 141- its causes; the
cases brought before it mainly quarrels
between neighbors, 142-of a simple
character, 143 - constitution of the or-
dinary law courts is very defective, 144
- personal character and influence of
the judges, 144 — such courts could be
advantageously introduced in the South-
ern States for causes to which freedinen

are parties, 146.
Dante, and his latest English Translators,

article on, 509-529 — mental and spirit-
nal characteristics of Dante, 509, 510-
individual and artistic character of his
Divine Comedy, 511 — friendship be-
tween him and Giotto, founded on their
similar truthfulness and simplicity, 512

- the Divine Comedy an allegory of
human life and immortality, 513 — its
intense religiousness, 513 — Chaucer's
appreciation of it, 614 - neglect of it
for four hundred years after Chaucer's
death, 615 — first translation of it into
German (1769), into French (1776)
515 — worthlessness of Boyd's transla-
tion, 516 — merits and defects of Cary's
517, 518 — list of English translations,
519

- opinions of translators as to best
mode of rendering it, 520 — difficulties
of translating poetry, 520, 521 - special
difficulty of translating Dante, because
he wrote at an early stage of language,
521 – because of great difference be-
tween vocabulary of English and Italian,
522 — value of Parsons's translation,
623 – compared with those of Dayman
and Ford, 624-526 – Dante can be best
rendered by an unrhymed, literal, line-
for-line translation, 626, 627 — success
of Longfellow and Rossetti in this mode,
628 — Divine Comedy not a popular
poem, 529.
De Tocqueville, The Error of, article on, 321

- 334 — DeTocqueville sent by Louis
Philippe to study institutions of United
States, 321 condition of nation at
time of his visit, 328 - his assumption
that the United States are a confedera-
tion of sovereignties, 324 – that an at-
tempt at secession would not be op-
posed by the general government, 326,

too powo

326 – supremacy of general government bases of present value of the paper
asserted in Fugitive Slave Bill

, 328, 329 dollar; want of a circulating medium,
popularity of “ Democracy in Amer- and the credit of government, 111 - 114
ica" in England, 330 - its doctrine – best method of bringing our cur.
welcomed and acted on by prominent rency to par, 111 - 125 — argument
Englishmen at outbreak of Rebellion, against return to specie payment, 114,
831, 332 — De Tocqueville's definition of 115 — laws of supply and demand de-
liberty, 333 — this the inspiration and termined withont reference to the circu-
secret of the struggle for national unity, lating medium, 116 - 119 — obstacles to
333, 334.

voluntary funding of the redundant cur-
Dickens, Charles, his opinion of the Amer- rency, 120 - 122 — advantages of com-
ican press, 413.

pulsory funding, with suitable legislation
Diplomacy during the Rebellion, Our, arti- to prevent the injustice of making those

cle on, 446 - 472 - general character of who had contracted debts in currency
the foreign and domestic policy of Presi- pay.in coin, 123 — policy of fixing by
dent Lincoln, 446, 447 — pitiablo state law a date for resuming specie payment,
of our foreign relations when his term 124 - reasons why currency should be
commenced, 448 — excellence of his furnished by government and not by
foreign appointments, 449 - instructions banks, 126 - 130 necessary features of
to ministers, 449, 450 — haste of France

government currency, 130-132 — not ne-
and England in acknowledging belliger- cessary in this country to borrow money
ent rights of Rebels, 450, 451

- aid af- to carry on war, 133, 134 - proper basis
forded Rebels by England, 452 — wise of our future financial policy, 136.
settlement of Trent difficulty, 453, 454 Flint, Austin, Jr., D.D., his Physiology of
- England's decision in the Alexandra Man, critical notice of, 624 - 627.
case, and correspondence growing out Frothingham, Richard, his Life and Times
of it, 455, 456 —- selfish policy of Eng- of Joseph Warren, critical notice of,
land, 457, 458 — condition of Mexico, 289-291.
459 — alliance of England, France, and
Spain against her, 460, 461 – ostensible Goodwin, William W., his Syntax of the
objects of each, 462, 463 — real object Moods and Tenses of the Greek Verb,
of France, 464, 465 – attitude of United critical notice of, 301 - 306.
States, 466 — secret of Louis Napoleon's
anxiety to be peacemaker between Harper's Weekly, critical notice of, 637,
United States and the Rebels, 467 638.
appointment of Maximilian as Emperor, Herald, The New York, article on, 378 –
468 - conditions of his acceptance of 419— power of London Times, 374
empire, 469 - our general relations with the telegraph prevents a paper despot-
foreign powers, 470, 471 - Secretary ism, 874, 376 — prestige of editorials
Seward's abilities and services as & gone, 375, 376 — everybody reads the
diplomatist, 471, 472.

morning paper, 377 — national impor-
Doolittle, Rev. Justus, his Social Life of tance of New York papers, and its
the Chinese, critical notice of, 574.

causes, 378 - The Herald the chief
Dryden, John, on translating poetry, 532, paper of New York City, 379 — was one
638.

of the chief obstacles to correct views

of Secession War, 380 - career of its
Eaton, Cyrus, his History of Thomaston, founder, 381-400 — his education, 382 —
etc., critical notice of, 318, 319.

experiences and observations in Boston,
Eddy, Daniel C., D. D., his Young Man's 383 — in Charleston, 384 — in New York,
Friend, critical notice of, 606 - 609.

384, 385 - habits, 885 — first success as
Elicott, Rt. Rev. Charles J., his Commen- & journalist, 386 — connection with the

taries on St. Paul's Epistles, critical Courier and Enquirer, 387, 388 – begins
notice of, 293 – 299.

the Globe, 388 — the Herald, 389

method and habits of labor, 390
Farrar, Mrs. John, her Recollections of characteristics of Herald that secured

Seventy Years, critical notice of, 571, purchasers, 391 – 395 — first money ar-
572.

ticle, 895 - success of Herald assured,
Financial Future, Our, article on, 100 - 396 — acquired its ill name by irrever-

135 - mischievous tendency to regard ent treatment of the Catholic Church,
our national debt as a benefit, 101 — 397, 398 — by its unscrupulous course
good effect of proposition to pay it by in politics, 399 — its course in the Se-
subscription, 102 — national advantage cession War, 400 — generosity to its
of paying a considerable share of it by

reporters, 401 - personal character of
direct tax, 103 — ruinous effect of ex- editor, 402, 403

the best reporters,
porting our securities, 104, 105 -com- most skilfully handled, make best
plexity of our bank and government paper, 403 - 405 — means of suppress-
currency, 105 - 107 — gold the best at- ing Herald, 406 - sketch of Tribune, its
tainable standard of value, 107 - 109 — editors, writers, and errors in manage-
ment, 406 - 411 – opportunity of Times to engage in war against secession e
• to become chief paper, 411 – Dickens's plained, 335 – distinction between m

opinion of Herald, 413, 414 – inadequate itary and martial law, 336 — martin
pay of writers and reporters, 415 - 417 — law defined by Duke of Wellington and
conditions of success to a newspaper,

Judge Holt, 337 — correct definition,
418.

337 — where it prevails of necessity,
Herman, or Young Knighthood, critical 338 – need of military commissions, 339
notice of, 632 - 634.

- their composition and jurisdietica,
Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, his edi- 339 - cases justly tried by them

tion of Translation of the Works of Secession War, 340 — cases improperly

Epictetus, critical notice of, 599-606. tried by them, 341 - exercise of martial
Holland, J. G., his Plain Talks on Familiar law during Secession War justified, 341

Subjects, critical notice of, 299-301. - 343 — provost courts, their jurisciie-
Hours of Labor, article on, 195 - 209 tion, 344 - only two established during

importance of determining the number Secession War, 344 — criticism of de-
of hours laborers can most profitably cision by Bureau of Military Justice,
work, 195 - conditions of production, that neither military commissions DCT
196 — evil effects of working too many provost courts can have jurisdiction of
hours per day, 197 — effect of a local civil suits, 345 — military crimes and
and of a general reduction of the hours their punishment, as set forth in articles
of labor on wages and production, 198– of war, 346 — court-martial, how con-
204 — machinery has not diminished stituted, 347 – mode of procedure, 848,
labor in this country, but elevated the 353, 354 — duties of judge-advocate,
standard of living, 204, 205 -- production 349 — difficulties of his position, 349 -
should not be reduced while national

352 -

remedy for them, 353 — power
debt is unpaid, 205 - production greatly of President to dismiss officers in die
increased by 'confidence in stability of grace, 355, 356.
government and integrity of the judici- Lindsley, Philip, D. D., his Works (edited
ary, 206, 207 — prodigality of rich does by Rev. LeRoy J. Halsey), critical no-
not help the poor, 207, 208 — improve- tice of, 573, 574.
ment needed in application of products
to uses of life, 208.

Mantua, Ducal, article on, 48-100 - ori.

gin of Mantua, 48, 49 — description of
International Arbitration, article on, 473 – it, 49-54 — its history under Romans,

509 — works on international law very 55 - legend of Virgil's birth, 56 - of
defective in information respecting ar- soldier who pierced Christ's side, 55,
bitration, 473 — different methods of 56 —under Lombard rule, 56 - under
arbitration practised, 474, 475 - efforts Charlemagne, 57 - under Rudolph, wbo
by individuals and societies to have an appointed a lord its ruler, 57 – Boniface,
international congress to settle disputed his munificence and wars, 57, 58 — the
points, 476, 477 attempts in United famous Matilda, 59 -- under a republi-
States Congress to secure international can government, 60 - 64 - under cap-
arbitration, 478-action of British Parlia- tains-general, the Bonacolsi, 64, 65-
ment, 479, 480 - of French government, under the Gonzagas, 66 - 100 – two
481 – questions between France and leading elements of character in Italian
United States submitted to arbitration, society, 67 — social condition of Mantus
482 — questions between United States under Luigi, first of the Gonzagas, 68,
and Spain, 483 — between England and 69 - patronage of arts and letters by
United States, 483 – 492 – 499 — between Lodovico, 74 — works of Giulio Romano,
United States and Mexico, 493 - 496 - 76, 77, 84-87 - splendor and corruption
between Portugal and United States, of Vincenzo's reign, 91, 92 - Ferdinand's
496 – 498 — is a government responsible repudiation of Camilla Faa di Casale,
to its citizens for claims it attempts to 93, 94 — sack of Mantua, and crimes
settle? 498, 499 — questions between leading to it, 95 - 100.
United States and several other nations, Mc Culloch, Secretary, his views respecting
500, 501 - cases in which arbitration is the currency, 128-132.
successful and proper, 502 - questions Martin, Henri, his History of France, Mary
in which it is not practicable, as in re- L. Booth's translation, critical notice of,
gard to war for maintenance of Union,

640, 641.
assumed right of French Emperor to Message, the President's, article on, 250 -
establish Maximilian in Mexico, 504, 260 — anxious interest felt in President
505 - refusal of England to submit to Johnson's first message, 250 - course
arbitration questions between herself of Democratic party toward him, 251 -
and United States arising out of Seces- his attitude toward Rebel States changed
sion War, 576 - 509.

by their misconduct and by the result

of Northern elections, 252 – evil influ-
Law, Military and Martial, article on, 334 ence of decision of Connecticut and

- 356 — readiness of American people Wisconsin against impartial suffrage,

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