FUNDAMENTAL PHILOSOPHY.

Portada
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

Crítica de los usuarios - Marcar como inadecuado

Jaime Luciano Balmes, 1810–1848. Balmes was a Spanish priest and a prominent philosopher, political writer, and journalist. The Catholic Encyclopedia accords him "a universally admitted place of honour amongst the greatest philosophers of modern times." Balmes is credited with reviving the scholastic system of thought that waned during the Enlightment. He said, "reading is like nourishment: the benefit is not in proportion to what is eaten, but rather what is digested,” and “Wherever there is a man who ponders an object, inquiring about its nature, its causes, its relationships, its origin, its end—there is a philosopher.” The Billins printed the first English translation of one of his greatest works, Filosofía Fundamental.  

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Historical View of the Value of Pure Ideas
42
Sensible Intuition
50
Intuitive and Discursive
54
The Sensism of Kant
57
Existence of Pure Intellectual Intuition
59
Value of Intellectual Conceptions Abstraction made from Intellectual Intuition
62
Illustrations of the Value of General Conceptions
65
Value of Principles independently of Sensible Intuition
68
Relations of Intuition with the rank of the Perceptive Being
71
Aspirations of the Human Soul
74
Elements and variety of the characters of Sensible Repre
76
sentation
78
Intermediate Representations between Sensible Intuition and the Intellectual Act
81
CHAPTER PAGE XXI Determinate and Indeterminate Ideas
84
Limits of our Intuition
88
Of the Necessity involved in Ideas
92
Existence of Universal Reason
96
In what does Universal Reason consist?
99
Remarks on the Real Foundation of Pure Possibility
102
Individual and Intellectual Phenomena explained by the Universal Subsisting Reason
105
Observations on the Relation of Language to Ideas
108
Origin and Character of the relation between Language and Ideas
112
Innate Ideas
115
BOOK FIFTH
123
IDEA OF BEING I Idea of Being
125
Simplicity and Indeterminateness of the Idea of Being 127
127
Substantive and Copulative Being
129
Being the Object of the Understanding is not the Possible Inasmuch as Possible 184
134
A Difficulty Solved
138
In what Sense the Idea of Being is the Form of the Under standing
141
All Science is founded in the Postulate of Existence
143
The foundation of Pure Possibility and the Condition of its Existence
147
Idea of Negation
150
Identity Distinction Unity Multiplicity
153
Origin of the Idea of Being
155
Distinction between Essence and Existence
161
Kants Opinion of Reality and Negation
164
Recapitulation and Consequences of the Doctrine concern ing the Idea of Being
168
BOOK SIXTH
173
UNITY AND NUMBEE CHAPTER PAGE I Preliminary Considerations on the Idea of Unity
175
What is Unity?
176
Unity and Simplicity
180
Origin of the Tendency of our Mind to Unity
183
Generation of the Idea of Number
187
Connection of the Ideas of Number with their Signs
191
Analysis of the Idea of Number in Itself and its Relations with Signs
194
BOOK SEVENTH
199
ON TIME I Importance and Difficulty of the Subject
201
Is Time the Measure of Movement?
203
Similarities and Differences between Time and Space
206
Definition of Time
211
Time is Nothing Absolute
213
Difficulties in the explanation of Velocity
215
Fundamental Explanation of Succession
219
What is Coexistence?
223
Present Past and Future
226
Application of the preceding Doctrine to several important Questions
231
The Analysis of the Idea of Time confirms its resemblance to the Idea of Space
234
Relations of the Idea of Time to Experience
236
Kants Opinion
239
Fundamental Explanation of the Objective Possibility and of the Necessity of the Idea of Time
242
Have we the Idea of the Infinite?
269
The Limit 27 2
271
Considerations on the Application of the Idea of the Infinite to continuous quantities and to Discrete Quantities in so far as these last are expressed in ...
274
Origin of the Vagueness and Apparent Contradictions in the Application of the Idea of the Infinite
278
Fundamental Explanation of the Abstract Idea of the Infinite
281
The Definition of Infinity confirmed by Application to Ex tension
285
Conception of an Infinite Number
289
Conception of Infinite Extension
292
Possibility of Infinite Extension
294
Solution of Various Objections against the Possibility of an Infinite Extension
296
Existence of Infinite Extension
302
Possibility of an Actual Infinite Number
304
Idea of Absolutely Infinite Being
311
All the Reality contained in Indeterminate Conceptions is affirmed of God
315
All that is not contradictory in Intuitive Ideas is affirmed of God
317
Intelligence and the Absolutely Infinite Being
321
Summing up
324
BOOK NINTH ON SUBSTANCE
329
Name and General Idea of Substance
331
Application of the Idea of Substance to Corporeal Objects
333
Definition of Corporeal Substance
338
Relation of Corporeal Substance to its Accidents
340
CHAPTER PAGE V Considerations on Corporeal Substance in Itself
344
Substantiality of the Human Me 347
347
Relation of the Proposition I Think to the Substantiality of the Me
349
Remarks on the Souls Intuition of Itself
352
Kants Opinion of the Arguments proving the Substantiality of the Soul
355
Kants Opinion of the Argument which he calls Paralogism of Personality
366
Simplicity of the Soul
377
Kants Opinion of the Argument proving the Simplicity of the Soul
381
In what manner the Idea of Substance may be applied to God
394
An important Remark and Summary
397
Pantheism examined in the Order of Ideas
399
Pantheism examined in the Order of External Facts
403
Pantheism examined in the Order of Internal Facts
406
Fichtes Pantheistic System
409
XEXSRelations of Fichtes System to the Doctrines of Kant
424
Contradiction of Pantheism to the Primary Facts of the Human Mind
429
Rapid glances at the Principal Arguments of Pantheists
434
BOOK TENTH
437
NECESSITY AND CAUSALITY I Necessity
439
The Unconditioned
442
Immutability of Necessary and Unconditioned Being
445
Ideas of Cause and Eifect
448
Origin of the Notion of Causality
451
Formula and Demonstration of the Principle of Causality
454
The Principle of Precedency
457
Causality in Itself Insufficiency and Error of some Ex planations
467
Necessary and sufficient Conditions of true Absolute Caus ality
474
Secondary Causality
476
CHAPTER PAGE XI Fundamental Explanation of the Origin of the Obscurity of Ideas in what relates to Causality 479
479
Causality of Pure Force of the Will
483
Activity
486
Possibility of the Activity of Bodies
493
XY Conjectures as to the Existence of Corporeal Activity
496
XYI Internal Causality
500
Remarks on Spontaneity
508
Final CausalityMorality
513
Various Explanations of Morality
520
Fundamental Explanation of the Moral Order
527
XXL A Glance at the Work
543

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 546 - ... per Christum obsecro, in nomine eius sancti sanctorum, nemo mihi obstrepat. et ego credidi, propter quod et loquor.
Página 551 - Je ne suis pas , ô mon Dieu , ce qui est : hélas ! je suis presque ce qui n'est pas. Je me vois comme un milieu incompréhensible entre le néant et l'être : je suis celui qui a été; je suis celui qui sera ; je...
Página 145 - The square of the hypothenuse is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides ; as, 5033 402+302.
Página 151 - Men suffer all their life long under the foolish superstition that they can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated by any one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time.
Página 551 - ... saisir ou l'apercevoir ; un je ne sais quoi qui finit dans l'instant même où il commence; en sorte que je ne puis jamais un seul moment me trouver moi-même fixe et présent à moimême pour dire simplement je suis. Ainsi ma durée n'est qu'une défaillance perpétuelle.
Página 392 - Non ergo per essentiam suam, sed per actum suum se cognoscit intellectus noster. Et hoc dupliciter. Uno quidem modo, particulariter, secundum quod Socrates vel Plato percipit se habere animam intellectivam, ex hoc quod percipit se intelligere. Alio modo, in universali, secundum quod naturam humanae mentis ex actu intellectus consideramus.
Página 392 - Therefore the intellect knows itself not by its essence, but by its act. This happens in two ways: In the first place, singularly, as when Socrates or Plato perceives that he has an intellectual soul because he perceives that he understands. In the second place, universally, as when we consider the nature of the human mind from knowledge of the intellectual act.
Página 393 - Est autem differentia inter has duas cognitiones. Nam ad primam cognitionem de mente habendam sufficit ipsa mentis praesentia, quae est principium actus, ex quo mens percipit se ''psam : et ideo dicitur se cognoscere per suam pr; esentiam.
Página 550 - ... mesurer avec moi. Ce qui passe peut être mesuré avec ce qui passe ; mais ce qui ne passe point est hors de toute mesure et de toute comparaison avec ce qui passe : il n'est permis de demander ni quand il a été, ni s'il était avant ce qui n'est pas, ou qui n'est qu'en
Página 551 - Un je ne sais quoi qui ne peut s'arrêter en soi, qui n'a aucune consistance, qui s'écoule rapidement comme l'eau; un je ne sais quoi que je. ne puis saisir, qui s'enfuit de mes propres mains , qui n'est plus...

Información bibliográfica