A Text-book on Sound: The Substantial Theory of Acoustics Adapted to the Use of Schools, Colleges, Etc

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Hall & Company, 1887 - 236 páginas
 

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Página 211 - The most striking example of this inflection of a sonorous wave that I have ever seen, was exhibited at Erith after the tremendous explosion of a powder magazine which occurred there in 1864. The village of Erith was some miles distant from the magazine, but in nearly all cases the windows were shattered ; and it was noticeable that the windows turned away from the origin of the explosion suffered almost as much as those which faced it. Lead sashes were employed in Erith church, and these being in...
Página 210 - BB, together, / blow the candle out. You may here observe, in a rough way, the speed with which the sound-wave is propagated. The instant I clap, the flame is extinguished; there is no sensible interval between the clap and the extinction of the flame.
Página 161 - ... a trail hours old, will almost instantly decide, by the arrangement of the atoms in the air, the direction it has taken; but, if momentarily mistaking the back-track, the difference, probably, in the intensity of the surcharged air warns him of his error, and leads him to reverse his course. Before stopping to quibble about the impossibility of sound being substantial emanations from its inconceivable tenuity, let us try to grasp the marvelous lesson taught by this fox and hound. Though the wind...
Página 180 - Imagine one of the prongs of the vibrating fork swiftly advancing. It compresses the air immediately in front of it, and when it retreats it leaves a partial vacuum behind, the process being repeated at every subsequent advance and retreat.
Página 211 - The village of Erith was some miles distant from the magazine, but in nearly all cases the windows were shattered ; and it was noticeable that the windows turned away from the origin of the explosion suffered almost as much as those which faced it. Lead sashes were employed in Erith church, and these being in some degree flexible, enabled the windows to yield to pressure without much fracture of the glass. Every window in the church, front and back, was bent inwards. In fact, as the sound-wave reached...
Página 164 - Is it annihilated? etc., etc. I have made the case even stronger than did the critic, to give the Substantial Philosophy a rare opportunity to show its powers of solution and explanation. And here its founder comes to the task, by the remark: ' How easy it is for even great men to be mistaken, especially when attempting to criticise something they do not understand or have not thoroughly investigated!
Página 186 - ... whether the sounds be soft or loud, high or low, simple or complex. The velocity of all sounds in air is about 1120 feet in a second, at the temperature of 60 deg. F. If colder, a rearrangement of the air-particles takes place under the action of cohesive force, causing sound to travel slower. This fact of the uniform velocity of all sounds in air at a given temperature is verified by listening to the playing of a band of music at a distance, all the sounds, however varying in intensity and pitch,...
Página 186 - Dr. Hall, in Microcosm, Vol. IV., p. 313; written at request of Dr. Henry A. Mott, in reply to one of his scientific correspondents. Q. 32. Is there any difference in the velocity of sounds of different pitch or different intensity? A. No; the velocity of sound is the same in a given medium, whether the sounds be soft or loud, high or low, simple or complex. The velocity of all sounds in air is about 1120 feet in a second, at the temperature of 60 deg. F. If colder, a rearrangement of the air-particles...
Página 154 - Arena, the leading monthly journal of this country devoted to a bold investigation of current philosophical teaching and its bearing upon the religious thought of the age.
Página 212 - So it would be with electricity traveling through a wire by an analogous law of conduction at, say, 1000 miles a second. If by any means we could cause the wire to move one mile a second at the same time, this mile of travel would have to be either added to or deducted from the velocity of the...

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