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twice as oxpensive, so dot mine profits “Yust read dot letter und see vot a vould be sax dimes instead of dree fine English correspondent I vas. dimes.

"Hey? "Yah, sure!

"Isn't dot de city limits? "Make a contract by me out, right “Ven she isn't busy dictating letters avay quick! Make de adfertising double by me, she write dose 'go-quick-after vot it vas before, und don't come around dem' letters, you write for me. und let me told you any foolish ques- “Dey vas yust like mine hunting dog tions.

Schneider, I take mit me when I go "Yessir. Adfertising has made a new duck shooting. Ven I wound a duck, man by me. Mine wife say dot she don't Schneider he go-quick-after-him, yust hardly know me yet, I vas so different like dem letters. Dey brings de business already.

sure! "I used to go home und grumble by “Yessir, de orders come fine. my beeziness troubles so much dot she “Many dimes I vake mineseluf up in vas afraid to ask me for money to buy de night und say, 'Uncle Sam's Postclothes for de children und herseluf mit, master General is on de vay to mine und now, ven I gif her de money mit- office mit customers in his pockets, und out she ask for it, she vonder if I don't mine wife ask me vot make me laugh - vas crazy.

in mine sleep? Und I yust say, 'O! "Yessir, dot vas a good joke, ain't it? noddings. Adfertising maybe.' Schmoke up!

“Yessir! I vas happy night und day "You like dot cigar? Two for ten since I find out how dot adfertising pay. cent. I celebrate mine conversation to “Keep it going, Meester Adfertising adfertising.

Agent. You write de adfertisements, "Yessir. Dot vas mine typewriter, vot und put dem in goot bapers, und me you hire for me, dot bring in de letters und my typewriter vill do de rest. for me to sign my name by.

"Schmoke up! und come again soon, "I dictate dem to her in mine broken und I vill buy you anoder of dem fine English und she mend dot English so cigars. Two for ten cent. dot you don't could find de cracks yet. "Yessir !”

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Course in Agricultural Journalism THE University of Illinois has the The Strawberry; B. W. Snow, statistidistinction of offering for the cian of American Agriculturist weeklies; first time a course in agricul- Leonard Barron, assistant editor of

tural journalism and beginning Country Life in Ameri.a; E. E. Faville, with the second semester 1907 a twelve- editor Successful Farming. Possibly one weeks' course is presented. The idea is or two other lecturers will be added, to give the students an opportunity of but the gentlemen named above will do becoming familiar with the requirements the bulk of the work. of the agricultural editor and business To give an idea of what these lectures man. The demand for trained workers cover, below is given a brief summary : in this line is considerable and the man- 1. What an agricultural journal is; agers of agricultural journals assert that its province. the average student from college is of 2. The agricultural editor; what he little value in a newspaper office. This must be and know; education and exis largely due to the fact that he has had perience required. absolutely no instruction in work of this 3. Securing of technical matter for kind. Very naturally, he is all at sea each week; where to get it; how to when he accepts a position on an agri- prepare it; time of publication. cultural paper.

4. The commercial side of agriculAs stated above, the course covers tural journalism; markets; judicious twelve weeks. One lecture a week is marketing of crops; business side of given by a practical newspaper man. agriculture. These lectures cover all phases of agri- 5. Preparing crop reports and their cultural journalism. While it is, of place in agricultural journalism. course, obviously impossible to teach the 6 . The advertising side of the agristudent office routine, it is quite feasible cultural journal. The part advertising to give him an idea of what an agri- plays in agricultural journalism. Charcultural journal is, and have him become acter of advertising desirable; character familiar with the education and experi- of advertising to be discarded. ence required by an agricultural editor 7 . The agricultural journal and agriand business man; also give him an in- cultural organizations. sight into the methods of securing copy, 8. The literary side of agricultural preparing this for the printer, the mak- journalism. ing up of forms, securing subscribers, 9. Making up an agricultural paper and many of the details necessary in the and some of the mechanical problems. manufacture of an agricultural journal. 10. The agricultural paper and the One lecture a week is given by a profes- large estate. sor from the university, wlio pays par- 11. The agricultural journal and the ticular attention to the purely literary small farmer. portion of the editor and business man's 12. Examinations. education. The preparation of articles, The class numbering about eighteen, is construction of sketches, etc., are noted made up of exceedingly bright young here.

men, who seem to take a lively interest The lecturers secured to date are C. A in the work. The outcome of this first Shamel, managing editor of Orange attempt to teach agricultural journalism Judd Farmer; W. H. Burke, editor of will be watched with interest.

Why the United States Leads as a Manufacturing Nation

By Louis J. Christie

FT may seem strange to the people methods of living, the characteristics of

of the old world that with all their the people, their brain power and its I years of civilization, with all the stimulation.

advantages time has opened up to In Spain, as in Mexico, there is the them, their great men—literally "makers little siesta in the middle of the dayof history," a practically new country in this is to a much less extent prevalent their ancient league should carry off also in France and Italy. such an immense number of honors, In Germany, in Russia and in Ausshould show itself as the industrial and tria you can see the women of the land manufacturing country of the world! toiling away at work that is hard even

And although many of these "old" to men, such as the building of railcountries make assertions to the con- roads — construction work -- ploughing trary, and gather statistics as proof of the fields—sometimes they are yoked them, they know, just as well as we, that together to draw the plough. In Berlin, the results of their work in the past few women clean the streets! years, and not the statistics, however · Is this prosperity? Does this reflect beautiful they may look, are the only credit on the industry of the mentangible proofs the business interests of their capabilities? the rest of the world will acknowledge. And yet, laying all of these things They know that statistics go to “make aside--allowing that these countries up" the proof, are used in the argument have their men of power in this parof the proof, but that is all.

ticular line, there is one thing they For just look at the invasion we have need :-one thing they must have to made in those same countries. The spread their power-and that is competiunderground system of London is not tion! Good, clean, strong competition ! only plastered over with signs of the For competition means lifemeans General Electric Co., “U. S. A.," but that every single person who is actwas contracted for and built by a Chi- ively engaged in the business affairs of cagoan.

the country must--to show a creditable Look at the street car system of Ber- increase in his line-use every bit of lin with its cars from Brill, “U. S. A." shrewdness, every bit of brain power Even the small stage from Flüelen to that he has—good, hard, solid, steady Altdorf in Switzerland bears its tag, work must be done constantly and con“U. S. A.," and many other instances sistently. Then taken up and rolled all could be cited.

into one big mass, these men, with their With results such as these, what as hard work, make the industrial value of sertions, from whatever authority they the country itself. come, could be made up and set before There is one phase in this life that the world, that could "pull the wool" has been overlooked, and that is the over the eyes of those who know?

stimulation, the methods which keep And why?

this huge ball a rolling. They are many Let me ask why this state of affairs and varied, but the one that stands forehas come about? Is it directly trace- most, the one that incites and keeps the able to one thing? In a way it is not, individual plugging away hour by hour, yet you must answer yes-to life. and day by day to hold up his end of

By "life" I mean the habits, general the thread of life is

The Advertising But people in Italy advertise, so do all the others, yet in such a pitiful way, just as a baby attracts attention by its squalls. They use the "system" long ago thrown out as impractical; the "go to Jones for meat and eggs" style, and that isn't advertising in its true sense. It's merely a display of type-it leaves no good impression.

I remember one instance especially, in going from Liverpool to London. At every station there was one large and prominently displayed sign that stood out above all others—and in many cases it was about all that could be seen as the train went whizzing by—and that was a splotch of ink! A big, disagreeable looking blot on a pretty, white background.

I have forgotten the name of the inan who made that ink; I doubt if I ever knew it. I use ink, lots of it, but with a reminder like that before me I wished I. had never seen any of the stuff, for it brought back some of the times my pen had taken on just a little too much, and a spoiled sheet was the result-and yet that was one of the most expensive pieces of advertising along the whole route.

Was it good? Did it do its work? Did I want to use that particular man's ink after the little unpleasantness he had brought back to me? No!

And then, again, every bus I saw in the great crowded streets of London car ried the sign “Nestle's Food”-I had heard of Nestle's Food, I'll admit. It's a baby tonic. It might as well have been a rat biscuit, for there was nothing there to tell about it.

Do babies like Nestle's Food? Is it good for them? Why? What does it cost? Where can it be bought? "What! You don't know? Hum. well. I'll let it go this time: haven't time to look it up." Is that advertising ?

Berlin, Paris, Rome, and in fact every city of any size at all through

out the Continent of Europe, has it's same kind and class of "display work,” millions of dollars are spent every year. Billboards are even erected along the railroad tracks; I saw them all over, up in the mountains, along the St. Gothard, down in the valleys, every where, but hardly a one was "advertising," hardly one did even a small part of its share in developing that part of the life which goes to make up the industry of the country!

Another instance, totally different from the others. Many of our cheapest toys are "made in Germany"—the delicacy of the workmanship is apparent to such an extent that we wonder how the price can be so low, yet in those districts where the toys are made labor is so cheap that it is almost given away. The industry is undeveloped, the countries are so "over populated” and all through the lack of that same stimulation.

Again, we all know what a lot of red tape is attached to the trading between different countries--we know that some large firm must import those same toys. Why don't they tell us who they are? Couldn't that little sign "Made in Germany" be just as cheaply made and put on if it read "Made by 'Nagelstadt,' Berlin”? We would know that Berlin was in Germany-we ought to! And wouldn't we know by and by that “Nagelstadt" is the largest toy maker in Germany, and when the time came that others over there wished to advertise their goods with us would we take them as readily as we would "Nagelstadt's"? No. for we'd know that this man, so long in the field is reliable, and his goods we'd call for.

It is the little things, the fine points that gradually build up thee welfare, the industry of the country and until these same "old" countries can come to realize this, the "little republic" across the water will continue to reign supreme.

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