Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

BACKSTAND

BACK-STAY

201

BADGEMAN

in farriery, by which hardened fieces are
withdrawn from the rectum.
Back-rent (bak'rent), n. In Scots lau, a rent
paid subsequently to reaping; thus, when a
tenant entering with a lease is allowed to
reap and sell his first crop before paying his
rent, the rent in this case is termed a back-
rent, in contradistinction to a rent payable
previously to the first crop being reaped.
and which is termed a fore-rent.
Back-rest (bak'rest), 1. A guide attached to
the slide-rest of a lathe and placed in contact
with the work to steady it in turning.
Back-return (bak'rē-térn), n. A going or
coming back; return. "Harry's back-return
to France.' Shak. "The back-return of
Charon's boat.' Marluve.
Back-room (bak'röm), 1. A room in the
back part of a house.
Back-rope (bak'rop), nr. Same as Martingale-

stays. See under MARTINGALE.
Back-saw (bak'sa), 12. d saw whose web is
stiffened by a metallic back of greater sub).
stance, such as a tenon-saw.
Backset + (bak'set), a. Set upon in the rear.

Dackset with Pharaoh's whole power.' Ant
Anderson
Backset (bak'set), n. A check or misadven-
ture in an undertaking; a relapse in illness.
(Scotch.)
Back-settlement (bak'set l-ment), 1. An
outlying and unreclaimed or only partially
reclaimed district of a country begioning to

be occupied for cultivation; as, the back-
settlements of America: mostly used in the
plural. See BACKWOODS.
Back-settler (bak'set-l-er), n. One inhabiting

the back-settlements of a country.
Backshish, Backsheesh (bal'shesh), 9. A
gift; gratuity; drink-money. See BAKSHISH.
Backside (bak'sid), n. The back part of any.
thing; the part opposite to the front or
behind that which is presented to the face
of a spectator, as the hind part of an animal;
the yard, ground, or place behind a house.
Back-sight (bak'sit), . 1. The first reading
from a levelling staff taken from any position
of the instrument. All other readings are
called fore-sights.--2. The rear sight of a gun.
Back-slang (bak'slang), nh. A species of
slang in which the words are pronounced
or written backwards, or as nearly so as
the skill of the speaker or writer, or the
nature of the word will permit; thus,
penny becomes yennep, woman naman,
and so on.
Backslide (bak-slid'), v.i. To slide back;
hence, to fall off; to apostatize; to turn
gradually from the faith.

I have fallen back to my carnal temper, from the
holy ways of God, and have again tackslided.

Bp. Hopeints.
Backslider (bak’slīd-er), n. One who back-
slides: (a) an apostate; one who falls from
the faith and practice of religion. Prov. xiv.
14. (6) One who neglects his vows of obe-
dience and falls into sin.
Backsliding (bak'slīd-ing), p. and a. Sliding
backwards; hence, apostatizing from faith
or practice; falling insensibly from religion
into sin or idolatry. 'Backsliding Israel."
Jer. iii. 6.
Backslidingness (bak'slīd-ing-nes), 1. The
state of backsliding
Sack-speed (bak'spēd), 12. In mech, a second
speed-gear of a lathe, which can be brought
into action on the fore-speed so that second
series of speeds of the spindle are thereby
obtained.
ack-staff (bak'star), 11. (From its being
used with the observer's back toward the
sun.) An instrument invented by Captain
John Davis about 1690, and used, before
che invention of the quadrant and sextant,

or taking the sun's altitude at sea.
Eckstair, Backstairs(bak'stăr, bak'stārz),
2. A stair or stairs in the back part of a
couse; private stairs,
ackstair, Backstairs (bak'stár, bakstārz)

,
· 1. Of or pertaining to stairs in the back
art of a house; as, a backstair entrance -

Indirect; oblique; underhand; unfair; as,
ackstairs influence.

He's like a backstair minister at court, who, whilst
zereputed favourites are sauntering in the bed-chan-
er, is ruling the roast in the closet. Str 7. Vaudrugh.
ck-stall (bak'stal), n. The thief who
alks behind the actual operator in a
arrote- robbery to conceal him when at
ork and make off with the booty. See
ARROTE-ROBBERY.
ckstand (bak'stand), th Support; some
ing to fall back upon. A sure stage and
stedfast backstande at home.' Hall.

Back-stay (bak'stă), 22. 1. In printing, a strap Back-washed (bak'wosht), a. Cleansed from ginal siphon. The external chamber is conof leather used to check the carriage of a oil, as wool after combing.

siderably larger than the rest. printing-press.--2. Naut. a long rope or stay Back-water (bak'wa-ter), n. 1. Water | Baculometry (bak-ū-lom'et-ri), n. (L. bacuextending from the top-mast, topgallant thrown back by the turning of a water lys, a staff, and Gr. metron, measure.) The mast or royal-mast head backwards to the wheel or the paddles of steamboats, &c. -- act of measuring distance or altitude by a side of a ship to assist the shrouds in sup. 2. Water held or forced back, as in a mill staff or staffs. porting the mast when strained by a weight race, or in a tributary of a stream, and in Bad (bad), a. compar. worse, superl. worst. of sail

consequence of some obstruction, as a dam [Etymology and affinities doubtful. Its idenBack-stone (bak'ston), n. [A corruption or the swelling of the river below.-3. An tity in form with Per. bad, bud, evil, is no for bake-stone.) The heated stone on which artificial accumulation of water obtained doubt accidental. The word is first known to oat-cake is baked. (Provincial.]

at high tide and reserved in reservoirs to occur in the Cursor Mundi, a metrical par. Back-stream (bak'strēm), n. A current be discharged at low tide for clearing off rative of Old and New Testament hisrunning against the regular course of the deposits in channel beds and tideways. tory, written about 1290. Skeat identifies stream; an up-stream.

4. A creek or arm of the sea which runs it with Corn. bad, foolish, stupid, insane, Back-sword (bak'sõrd), n. 1. A sword with parallel to the coast, having only a narrow Gael. baodh, baoth, vain, foolish, &c.; the one sharp edge.--2. A stick with a basket slip of land between it and the sea and meaning, however, is somewhat against handle used in fencing. — 3. The game of communicating with the latter by barred this.] The opposite of good; wanting good single-stick. entrances.

qualities, physical or moral: a word of the Back-tack (bak'tak), n. In Scots law, a tack Backwoods (bak'wydz), n. pl. Woody or widest application, being applied in the connected with wadsets or mortgages, by forest districts in partially settled countries most general way to whatever falls below which the possession of the land is returned situated back or away from the more thickly an assumed type or standard, or the averto the proprietor on payment of a rent cor settled parts: more especially used in regard age of objects of its class, to whatever is inresponding to the interest of the money to the United States and Canada.

jurious or offensive, or intended to be so; advanced. See WADSET.

Backwoodsman (bak'wụdz-man), n. An and both to what is bad (as, a bad heart, Back-tool (bak'töl), n. In bookbinding, a inhabitant of the backwoods.

bad health) and what makes bad (as, bad infillet, roller, or other hand tool for dry

The General Boom, backwoodsman of Kentucky,

fluence, bad example). Its leading meanings tooling or gilding the backs of books. Was happiest amongst mortals anywhere. Byron.

or applications may be given as follows:Back-trick 1 (bak'trik), n. A caper backwards

Bad, wicked, unprincipled, depraved, or in dancing

Backworm (bak'werm), n. A small worm malicious man, heart, or disposition; bad,
I have the back-trick simply as strong as any man in generally found in the thin skin about the immoral, or vicious life or conduct; bad,
Illyria.
Shak. reins of hawks. See FILANDERS.

evil, pernicious, debasing, or corrupting inBackward, Backwards (bak'werd, bak'. Back - wounding (bak' wond - ing), a. fluence, example, habits; bad, ill, or infirm Werdz), adv. [Back, and ward,denoting direc Wounding in the back or behind one's health; bad, unwholesome, or noxious air, tion.] 1. With the back in advance; as, to move back; injuring surreptitiously. Back climate, or food; bad or defective crop; bad, backward.-2. Toward the back; as, to throw wounding calumny.' Shak.

poor, or sterile soil; bad, unfortunate, or unthe arms backward; to move backward and Bacon (bá'kn), n. 10. Fr. bacon, from 0.D.

happy issue or marriage; bad, unwelcome, or forward.-3. On the back or with the back baken, bacon, from bak, bake, a pig; G. bache,

distressing news; bad, incompetent, or indownward. "Thou wilt fall backward.' Shak, a wild sow.] 1. Hog's flesh salted or pickled efficient workman. 4. Toward past times or events; as, to look

and dried, usually in smoke. -2. A hog; Bad (bad), n. That which is bad; as, there backward on the history of man.-5. By way hence, a grossly fat person. On, bacons, are bads and goods among them.--To go to of reflection; reflexively.

on!' Shak. - To save one's bacon, to preserve the bad, to be ruined or become depraved; The mind can backward cast one's self from harm.

to fall into bad company, bad ways, or bad Upon herself her understanding light. Sir 7. Davies,

circumstances.
But here I say the Turks were much mistaken,
6. From a better to a worse state; as, public Who, hating hogs, yet wished to save their bacon. Bad, Bade (bad), pret. of bid.
affairs go backward. The work went back-

Byron.
1 bad her no farewell.

Tennyson, ward.' Dryden.7. In time past. "Some Bacon-beetle (ba'kn-be-ti), n. A species

I made a feast; I bade him come. Tennyson, reigns backward. Locke.-8. In a contrary of Dermestes (D. lardarius), family Dermes Baddam (bad'dam), n. A species of bitter or reverse manner, way, or direction; from tidæ, order Coleoptera, whose larva is very almond imported into some parts of India the end to the beginning; in an order con destructive to stuffed animals in museums. from Persia, and used as money. The badtrary to the natural order; as, to read back It is hairy, and whitish-brown in colour. dam is worth about one farthing, sixty ward. What is a b read backward !' Shak. Baconian (ba-ko'ni-an), a. Pertaining to making a pie.

I never yet saw man but she would spell him back. Lord Bacon, or his system of philosophy: Baddert (bad'ér), a. compar. of bad. Were ward.

Shak. This system is founded upon induction, and it badder, it is not the worst.' Lyly. Backward (bak' werd), a. 1. Done in an is also known as the Inductive Philosophy. Badderlocks (bad'ér-loks), n. [Perhaps for order contrary to the natural order, as See INDUCTION.

Balder's locks, from Balder, the hero of a sentence repeated from the end to the Bacterium (bak-tē'ri-um), n. pl. Bacteria Scandinavian mythology; or the terminabeginning

(bak-tēri-a). (Gr.baktron, a stick.) 1. A genus tion may be the lock in charlock, hemlock; Without his rod reversed,

of Algæ comprising the simplest forms be A. Sax. leac, a plant, a leek.) A common And backward mutters of dissevering power, longing to the Nostoc group. They are name for the Alaria esculenta, a sea-weed We cannot free the lady.

Milton.

simple cells of a spherical or oblong form, of the order Laminariaceæ, found on the 2. Being in the back or at the back.

which multiply by transverse division of shores of the north of Europe. It has a Four legsand two voices. ... His forward voice now

the cells. They either separate or remain stem of from 4 to 8 inches long, and a frond is to speak well of his friend: his backward voice is to utter foul specches and to detract. Shak,

attached in chains. A simple plant is not from 2 to 12 feet, with a stout midrib, which 3. Turned back. A backward look.' Shak.

more than the twenty-thousandth of an last is eated by the people of Scotland, Ire

inch in diameter.-2. A genus of orthopter land, Denmark, &c. Called also Henware 4. Unwilling; averse; reluctant; hesitating;

ous insects, family Phasmidæ, the stick and Muslins. slow; dilatory; sluggish.

insects. See PHASMIDÆ. For wiser brutes are backward to be slaves. Pope,

Baddestt (bad'est), a. superl. of bad. The mind is backward to undergo the fatigue of

Bactrian (bak'tri-an), a. Of or pertaining The baddest among the cardinals is chosen pope. weighing every argument.

Sir E. Sandys.
Walls.

to Bactria, an ancient province of the Per-
sian empire. Bactrian camel, the common

Baddish (bad'ish), a.
5. Dull; not quick of apprehension; behind

Somewhat bad; in

different.
in progress. The backward learner.' South. or two-humped camel.

He wrote baddish verses.
Bactrian (bak'tri-an), n.
6. Late; behind in time; coming after some-

A native or inha

Fenrey. thing else or after the usual time; as, backbitant of ancient Bactria.

Badge (baj), n. (L.L. bagea, bagia, a sign,

probably from 0. Sax. bag, A. Sax. beah, beag, ward fruits; the season is backward. -7. Being Bactris (bak'tris), n. [Gr. baktron, a staff.} behind or already past. Flies unconscious

A genus of slender palms, consisting of a bracelet, ring, garland, crown, from beogan, o'er each backward year.' Byron.

about forty species, found about rivers and to bow, to bend.] 1. A mark, sign, token, Backward t (bak'werd), n. The things or

in marshy places in America within the or cognizance worn to show the relation of state behind or past.

tropics. The stems are generally covered the wearer to any person, occupation, or What seest thou else

with spines, and the leaves pinnate, though order; thus the garter is the badge of a In the dark backward and abysm of time? Skak. occasionally simple or two-lobed. The fruit knight of that order. Tax-gatherers, recog. Backward + (bak'wérd), v.t. To obstruct; to

is small and soft, with a subacid rather nized by their official badges.' Prescott. keep back *Doth clog and backward us.' fibrous pulp inclosed in a bluish-black rind,

On his breast a bloody cross he bore, Hammond. and affords a grateful food to birds. The The dear remembrance of his dying Lord;

For whose sweet sake that glorious badge he wore. Backwardation (bak-werd-a'shon ), n.

kernel of B. major is eaten in Carthagena. A

Spenser. consideration paid to purchasers for an exThe stems of B. minor are used for walk

2. The mark or token of anything. Sweet tension of time by speculators on the Stock ing-sticks under the name

mercy is nobility's true badge. Shak. Exchange unable to supply the stock or of Tobago canes.

3. Naut. a carved ornament on ships, near

A shares they have contracted to deliver, from Baculite bak'ü-lit), n.

the stern, often containing the representa-
which the anomaly arises that stocks and
fossil cephalopod of the

tion of a window.
shares may occasionally be bought cheaper Baculites (hak-ü-li'tēz), n.
genus Baculites;staff-stone.

Badge (baj), v.t. To mark or distinguish on credit than for cash. See CONTANGO.

with a badge or as with a badge. [Rare.] Backwardly (bak'werd-li), adv. Unwill(L. baculus, a staff, and Gr.

Their hands and faces were all badged with blood. ingly; reluctantly; aversely; perversely; ill. lithos, a stone.) A genus

Shal. of polythalamous or manyI was the first man

Badgeless (baj'les), a. Having no badge. That e'er received gift from him; chambered cephalopods be

Some badgeless blue upon his back.' Bp.
And does he think so backwardly of me now, longing to the family Am-

Ilall.
That I'll requite it last?

Skak.
monitidee. The species are

Badgeman (bajman), n. A man who wears
Backwardness (bak'wėrd-nes), n.
1. The only known in a fossil state,

a badge; specifically, an alms-house man: state or quality of being backward : (a) having become extinct at

so called because a special dress or badge unwillingness ; reluctance; dilatoriness or the close of the cretaceous Portion of Bacutdulness in action.

is worn to indicate that the wearer belongs Our backwardness to period. The shell is straight, lites Faujasii. to a particular foundation. good works.' Atterbury. (6) Behind in more or less compressed,

He quits the gay and rich, the young and free, progress; slowness; tardíness; as, the back

The conical, and very much elongated.

Among the badgemen with a badge to be. wardness of the spring. chambers are sinuous and pierced by a mar

Crabbe. ch, chain; ch, Sc. loch; 8, go; j, job; n, Fr. ton; ng, sing; TH, then; th, thin; w, wig; wh, whig; zh, azure. - See KEY.

y, Sc. fcy.

BADGER

202

BAGGAGE-CHECK

A playind

, salcy young woman; a firt.

of Poland, Italy, the sole in Scotland and Ireland. regarded as the nation

[ocr errors]

bag-check (bag'aj-chek), 1. A tag Kiel to be attached to an article of berage belonging to a railway passenger påt of departure, and frequently bearing the name of the railway company that makes the check. (United States.) Lase-master (hagʻåj-mas-ter) 7. In America, an officer or guard employed on prays in looking after the baggage. begager i (bag'ij-er), 11. One who carries ene; specifically, one who assists in tarying the baggage of an army. The whole camp led amain, the victuallers and prayer forsaking their camps Raleigh. bagala

, Baglo (bag'ga-la, bag'lo), n. bepala, a muie.) A two-masted Arab wat teed for trading in the Indian Ocean, Hreen the Malabar coast and the Red la large numbers of them trade between Xuacat

, the Red Sea, and India, making

Forage each way annually with the teneous They are generally from two tubred to two hundred and fifty tons berden, erceedingły weatheriy, and are reurbable for the elevation of the stern, vied is highly ornamented.

Old English Ba

BAGGAGE

Badger (baj'ér), n. A licensed porter or coloured, from the colour of the capsules.] Baft (baft), n. (Pers.) A blue or white cotcarrier entitled to wear a badge. Sim. The fruit of Illicium anisatuin, the Chinese ton used in the India trade, monds.

anise tree. It abounds in a volatile oil Bag (bag), 1. (Icel, baggi, böggr, a bag, a Badger (baj'ér), n. (For bladger, from L. L. which gives it an aromatic flavour and bundle; A. Sax. bælg, a bag, belly; Goth. bladarius, bladerius, a corn-dealer; from odour. On this account it is much used in balgs, a pouch. The word seems to be both LL. bladum, corn, wheat (Fr.blé), lit. grain China and India as a condiment, and is im. Teutonic and Celtic; comp. 0.Fr, bague, il carried off the field, for L. ablatum - ab, ported into France for flavouring.

bundle, Gael. bag, balg, a bag or wallet. from, and latum, carried. The omission of Badigeon (ba-dijon), n. [Fr.) 1. A mixture See BELLY, BULGE.) 1. A sack; a wallet; a 1, though unfamiliar, is not unknown after of plaster and freestone, ground together pouch, usually of cloth or leather, to put labials. Thus Sc. peugh for plough, bue for and sifted, used by statuaries to fill the anything in, as corn, money, &c. -2. A sac blue.] In old law, a person who was licensed small holes and repair the defects of the or receptacle in animal bodies containing to buy corn in one place and sell it in stones of which they make their statues. some fluid or other substance; as, the honey. another without incurring the penalties of 2. A mixture of saw-dust and glue, or of bag of a bee.-3. A sort of silken purse engrossing. See BADGERING. whiting and glue, used by joiners to All up formerly tied to men's hair.

'A bob wig Badger (baj'ér), n. (Generally regarded as defects in their work.-3. A preparation for and black silkep bag tied to it.' Addison.another application of the preceding word, colouring houses, consisting of powdered 4. What is contained in a bag; in the lana corn-dealer, because the animal was sup stone, saw-dust, slaked lime, alum, &c. guage of sportsmen, the animals bagged or posed to feed on corn; compare its French Badinage (bad'i-nāj or bå-di-näch), n. (Fr., obtained; in com. a determinate quantity of name blaireau, bléreau, from L.L. bladar from badin, facetious, from It. and LL, ba a commodity such as it is customary to carry ellus, from bladum, wheat. But the name dare, to gape, to look amorously on, to to market in a sack; as, a bag of pepper or in England may have partly at least become trifle.) Light or playful discourse.

hops; a bag of corn. - Bag and spoon, an attached to it from the prominent and

He seems most to have indulged himself only in an arrangement used in dredging for river peculiar manner in which the head is elegant badinage,

Warburton. sand, and consisting of a bag attached by marked, badger meaning badge-wearer.) 1. A Badinerie (bä-den-rē), n. (Fr., from badin. the mouth to an iron hoop which is fastened plantigrade carnivorous mammal, of the See BADINAGE.] Light or playful discourse;

to a long pole, by means of which it is sunk genus Meles, family Melidre, according to nonsense; badinage.

to the bottom of the river and dragged along some naturalists Ursidæ or bears, or, accord.

so that the bag is filled. --Bag of bones, a

The fund of sensible discourse is limited; that of ing to others, Mustelidæ or weasels, of a

jest and badinerie is infinite.

Shenstone.

familiar expression denoting & very lean clumsy make, with short thick legs, and long Badineur (bä-den-ėr), n. (Fr. See BADIN

person. "Such a limping bag of bones as I

was. AGE.) One who indulges in badinage; a

Dickens. -- To give one the bag, to trifler.

dismiss a person from one's employment. Rebuke him for it, as a divine, if you like it, or as

Bunyan. (Now used only colloquially.) a badineur, if you think that more effectual. Pope. Bag (bag), v.t. pret. & pp. bagged; ppr. Badly (bad'li), adv. In a bad manner; not

bagging. 1. To put into a bag; as, to bag well; unskilfully; grievously; unfortunately;

hops.-2. To load with bags.--3. To distend, imperfectly. See BAD.

as a bag; to swell. Badminton (bad'min-ton), n. An out-door

How doth an unwelcome dropsy bag up his eyes.

Bp. Hau. game, the same as lawn-tennis but played with shuttlecocks.

4. To seize, capture, or entrap; to shoot or Badness (bad'nes), n. The state of being

otherwise lay hold of; as, to bag thirty bad, evil, vicious, or depraved; want of Bag (bag), v.i. 1. To swell or hang like a

brace of grouse. Colloq. ).
good qualities, physical or moral; as, the

bag.
badness of the heart, of the season, of the
Badger (Meles vulgaris).
roads, &c. See BAD.

His frill and neck-cloth hung limp under his bagging waistcoat.

Thackeray. claws on the fore-feet. The common badger, Bæckia (bek'i-a), n. [In honour of A. Bæck, a physician to the King of Sweden.) A genus

2. To grow big with child. or Meles vulgaris, is as large as a middling

They are of plants, nat. order Myrtacea.

Then Venus shortly bagged, and ere long was Cupid sized dog, but much lower on the legs, with

bred.

Warner a flatter and broader body, very thick tough

small shrubs, with small opposite leaves and

numerous small white or rose-coloured Bag (bag), v.t. To cut with a reaping-hook hide, and long coarse hair. It inhabits the

flowers. They are natives of the Indian or scythe: used especially of cutting pease. north of Europe and Asia, burrows, is indoArchipelago and Australia, and many are

Halliwell. (Provincial. ) lent and sleepy, feeds by night on vegecultivated in our greenhouses.

Bag (bag), n. A flue in a porcelain oven tables, small quadrupeds, &c., and is very

Bael (bä'el ), n. The Indian name of the ascending on the internal side and entering fat. Its skin, when dressed with the hair

the oven about 4 feet above the sole. E. H. Bengal quince-tree (Ægle Marmelos). Writon, is impervious to rain, and consequently

Knight. ten also Bel, Bhel. See ÆGLE. makes excellent covers for travelling trunks, Baff (bat), n. (From sound.) A blow; a Bagasse (ba-gas), n. (Fr.) The sugar-cane &c.

Its flesh makes good bacon, and its hair is used for artists' brush heavy thump. [Scotch.)

in its dry crushed state as delivered from in painting. Baffetas, Baftas (baf'fe-tas, baf'tas), n. (See the sugar-mill. Its only use is as fuel in The American badger (M. Labradorica) is

BAFT.) An Indian cotton cloth or plain heating the boilers and pans in the sugarcalled the ground-hog, and is sometimes

muslin. That of Surat is said to be the best. manufactory. Called also Cane-trash. white. It is a wide-spread vulgar error that the legs of the ballger are shorter on one Baffle (baf'fl), v.t. pret. & pp. baffled; ppr. Bagatelle (bag-a-tel'), n. (Fr., from It.

bagatella, a dim, of bagata, a trifle. Diez baffling. (Perhaps the same word as 0. Fr. side than on the other; hence, The uneven badger.' Drayton. beffler, to make a fool of, from 0. Fr. beffe, supposes it comes from LL baga, O. Fr.

bague, a bundle, so that bagatelle means We are not badgers,

Pr. bafa, mockery, according to Malın from For our legs are one as long as the other. Lyly. Prov.G. baffen, bäffen, to bark, to chide; or any little thing one possesses. See BAG.)

1. A trifle; a thing of no importance. a modified form of Sc. bauchle, to treat con2. An artist's brush made of badger's hair, and used for blending or causing the pig.

temptuously, from bauch, insipid, abashed, Heaps of hair rings and cypher'd seals; Icel, búgr, poor, uneasy.) 1.To treat with

Rich trifles, serious bagatelles. Prior. ments to melt or shade into each other and imparting smoothness. --Badger baiting, or

mockery or infamy; to hold up as an object 2. A game played on a board having at the drawing the badger, a barbarous sport for

of scorn or contempt; to insult; specifically, end nine holes, into which balls are to be merly, and yet to some extent, practised,

to subject to various indignities, as a re struck with a cue or mace resembling those generally as an attraction to public-houses

creant knight or traitor. A glorious soldier used in billiards. of the lowest sort. knock'd and baffld.' Thos. Randolph.

A A badger is put in a

Bagatelle-board (bag'a-tel-bord), n. barrel, and one or more dogs are put in to Alas, poor fool, how have they baffled thee! Shak. board on which to play at bagatelle.

A filter used in drag him out. When this is effected he is 2. To elude; to foil; to circumvent; to frus- Bag-filter (bag'il-ter), n. returned to his barrel to be similarly as trate; to check; to defeat; to disconcert; to sugar-refining to clear saccharine solutions sailed by a fre-h set. The badger usually thwart; to confound. 'Calculations so diffi

of feculencies and impurities suspended in makes a most determined and savage resist. cult as to have baffled . the most en

them, and consisting of a series of sieves or ance. lightened nations.

strainers through which the solutions pass

Prescott, Badger (baj'ér), v.t. To attack, as the badger

They make a shift to break the precept, and at the

into one or more flannel bags, from which is attacked when being drawn or baited; to same time to bafle the curse.

South

the juice drips down into a receiver below. worry; to pester. Baffle 1 (baf'a), v.i. 1. To practise deceit.

Baggage (bagʻāj), n. [Fr. bagage, baggage, When one has to be badgered like this, one wants

0. Fr. bague, a bundle. See BAG.] 1. The a drop of something more than ordinary. Trollope.

Do we not palpably baffle when, in respect to God, tents, clothing, utensils, and other neces.

we pretend to deny ourselves, yet, upon urgent occaBadgering (baj'ér-ing), n. (See BADGER, a sion, allow him nothing.

Barron.

saries of an army, or other body of men on corn-dealer.] The practice of buying corn

the move.-2. The clothing or other belong. 2. To struggle ineffectually.

ings which a traveller carries with him on a or victuals in one place and selling them in

For hours previously the ill-fated ship was seen another for profit. The act 7 and 8 Vict.

journey, now usually called luggage in this baffling with a gale from the N.W. Times newspaper, xxiv. abolished the previous acts against | Baffle + (bat'í), n. A defeat by artifice, shifts,

country, though baggage is still the common

word in America badgering, declaring it to be no longer an

Mounting the baronet's and turns.

baggage on the roof of the coach.' Thackeray, offence.

It is the skill of the disputant that keeps off a bafite. Badger-legged (baj'ér-legd), a. Having a

Having dispatched my baggage by water

Sonth. leg or legs shorter on one side than on the Baffler (baf'ner), n. One who or that which

to Altdorf.' Coxe. - Bag and baggage, all other, as the badger's are erroneously sup

one's belongings or property. baffles. Experience, that great bajsler of posed to be. speculation.' Dr. H. More.

Dolabella designed, when his affairs grew desperate His body crooked all over, big-bellied, badger. Baffling (baf'fling), p. and a. Frustrating;

in Egypt, to pack up bag and baggage, and sail for Italy

Arbuthnot lepped, and his complexion swarthy. L'Estrange. disconcerting; confusing; as, a baffling wind,

Baggage (bag'aj). n. [Fr. bagarre, It. bag. Badiaga (bad - i-a'ga), m. (Rus. bodyaga.) that is, one which frequently shifts from one

ascia, Sp. bagazo, a catamite, a strumpet. A small sponge (Spongilla) common in the point to another. north of Europe, the powder of which is Bafflingly (baf'fling-li), adv. In a baflling

Origin doubtful] 1. A low worthless woman;

a strumpet used to take away the livid marks of bruises. manner.

A spark of indignation did rise in her not to suffer Badiane, Badian (bá'di-an, bad'i-an), 9. Bafilingness (baf'fling-nes), n. Quality of

such a bagage to win away anything of hers. [Fr. badiane, said to be from L. badius, bay baffling.

Sir P. Sidney. Fate, fair, fat, fall, mé, met, her; pine, pin; note, not, möve; tübe, tub, byli; oil, pound;

ü, Sc. altme; 9. Se, fey.

belly (Scotch. ]

Scotland, especially Celt
only Scottish by adoption
into that country from E
liest notice of it in Scotl
treasurer's accounts in
IV., wherein are frequen
paid 'to Inglis pyparis,'
before the king, who had
with him from England.
could well play the bas
spere's days a ‘Yorkshir-
drone of a Lincolnshire
The bagpipe consists
which receives the air E
from bellows; and of pi
air is pressed from the
mer's elbow. One pipe
plays the melody, othe
sound respectively the
lower) and the fifth of
being produced by me

chanter has eight holes,
Baggala

stops and opens at pl

several species of bagpi
Bagge, t t.i. To swell, as with pride or melodious Irish bagpis
dielain; more probably, Tyrwhitt says, to Highland bagpipe, the
Aquint 'False fortune that baggeth (now no longer used), th
boule, and looketh faire.' Chaucer.
Baggle (bag'i), m. (A dim. of bag.) The

Bagpipe (bag'pīp), v.t.
a bagpipe. - To bagpiy

to lay it aback by brin
Agad New-star I wish thee, Maggie!
Hec, there's a ripp to thy auld daggie. Burns.

mizzen shrouds.
Bagging (bag'ing). n. 1. The act of putting

Bagpiper (bag'pip-ėr), into baga – 2 The cloth or other materials bagpiper. Shak.

on a bagpipe. *Lau Baggingly, adv. Sulkily; squintingly. Ro

Bag-pump (bagʻpump

in which there is an
Munt or the Rone.

at intervals by rings,
Barry (tragi), a. Having the appearance of
a bag; bulging out loosely like a bag; puffy;

the bottom of the pi
2, a bazny umbrella

the other to the valve Bagimont's Roll (baj'i-monts röl), n. The

Bag-reef (bagʻrēs), n.

sail.
rent-toll of Scotland, made up in 1275 by Bagshot-sand (bag's
called Bagimont, who was sent from Rome

the collective name
by the pope, in the reign of Alexander III.,

siliceous sand, know
to collect the tithe of all the church livings

occupying extensive
in Surrey, and in th
shire. They may b
divisions, the uppe
consisting of light.
central or Barton
of dark-green sand

whole reposing on I
Bagman (bag'man), n. A name formerly they contain severa

generally devoid of
a wand, from It.ba
a rod, the dim. ter
substituted for the
arch. a little round
gal, called when pla
with foliage a cha
bag attached to it
Bah (bå), interj. A

for barn

Benennund or Baiamund de Vicci, vulgarly

in Scotland for an expedition to the Holy Land It remained the statutory valuation, Bicording to which the benefices were taxed, tillthe Reformation. A copy of it asitexisted in the reigu of James V. is in the Advocates Library, Edinburgh. Baglo, Bee BAGGALA, given to commercial travellers from their Baguet, Baguette travelling on horseback, carrying their amples or wares in saddle-bags: now used only as conveying somewhat of contempt. Bagnet (bag net), n. An interwoven net in the form of a bag for catching fish. Baznio (bin' yo), . [It. bagno, from L. bellicum, a bath. 1 1. A bath; a house for Bag-wig (bag'wig bathing, cupping, sweating, and otherwise cleansing the body. -2. A brothel; a stew. Bagnollan (bag-noi-an), n. [From Bag- contempt, disgust munka, in Languedoc, where the heresy had ita rise. 1 One of a sect of French heretics

Twenty-five years
of the eighth century who rejected the
whole of the Old and part of the New Bahar, Barre (ba

Indian measure o
Bagpipe (bag pip), . A musical wind-in-
triment ol very great antiquity, having

with the substa
been used among the Hebrews and Greeks, being from 223 tu
and being a favouriteinstrumentover Europe Baide (bad), pret
perally in the Afteenth century. It still

to endure to centimes in use among the country people

brunt.' Burns. ch chain; bu, Se loch: 8. go; l. job;

ton

Testamente

was utterly unknown

ably in differenti

BAGGAGE-CHECK

203

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

2. A playful, saucy young woman; a flirt. of Poland, Italy, the south of France, and B (Familiar.)

in Scotland and Ireland. Though now often Baggage-check (bag' aj.chek), n.

A tag regarded as the national instrument of or label to be attached to an article of luggage belonging to a railway passenger to indicate its destination, usually also its point of departure, and frequently bearing the name of the railway company that attaches the check. (United States.) Baggage-master (bag'āj-mas-tér), n. Iu

E Ainerica, an officer or guard employed on railways in looking after the baggage. Baggagert (bag'äj-er), n. One who carries baggage; specifically, one who assists in carrying the baggage of an army.

The whole camp Aed amain, the victuallers and hagragers forsaking their camps. Raleigh. Baggala, Baglo (bag'ga - la, bag'lo), n. [Ar. bagala, a mule.) A two-masted Arab boat used for trading in the Indian Ocean, between the Malabar coast and the Red Sea. Large numbers of them trade between Muscat, the Red Sea, and India, making one voyage each way annually with the monsoons. They are generally from two hundred to two hundred and fifty tons burden, exceedingly weatherly, and are re

Old English Bagpipe. markable for the elevation of the stern, which is highly ornamented.

Scotland, especially Celtic Scotland, it is only Scottish by adoption, being introduced into that country from England. The earliest notice of it in Scotland is in the royal treasurer's accounts in the reign of James IV., wherein are frequent entries of monies paid 'to Inglis pyparis,' who came to play before the king, who had brought the taste with him from England. Chaucer's miller could well play the bagpipe, and in Shakspere's days a Yorkshire bagpipe' and the

drone of a Lincolnshire pipe' were familiar. The bagpipe consists of a leathern bag, which receives the air from the mouth, or from bellows; and of pipes, into which the air is pressed from the bag by the performer's elbow. One pipe (called the chanter) plays the melody, others (called drones) sound respectively the key-noie (an octave lower) and the fifth of the scale, the sound being produced by means of reeds. The

chanter has eight holes, which the performer Baggala.

stops and opens at pleasure. There are

several species of bagpipes, as the soft and Bagge, v.i. To swell, as with pride or melodious Irish bagpipe, the more martial disdain; more probably, Tyrwhitt says, to Highland bagpipe, the old English bagpipe squint. 'False fortune that baggeth (now no longer used), the Italian bagpipe, &c. foule, and looketh faire.' Chaucer.

Bagpipe (bag pīp), v.t. To cause to resemble Baggie (bag'i), n. [A dim. of bag.) The a bagpipe. --To bagpipe the mizzen (naut.), belly. Scotch.)

to lay it aback by bringing the sheet to the A guid New-year I wish thee, Maggie!

mizzen shrouds. Hae, there's a ripp to thy auld baggie. Burns.

Bagpiper (bag'pip-er), n. One who plays Bagging (bag'ing), n. 1. The act of putting on a bagpipe. Laugh like parrots at a into bags.-2. The cloth or other materials bagpiper.' Shak. for bags.

Bag-pump (bagʻpump), n.. A kind of pump Baggingly, adv. Sulkily; squintingly. Ro in which there is an elastic bag distended maunt of the Rose.

at intervals by rings, fastened at one end to Baggy (bag'i), a. Having the appearance of the bottom of the piston-chamber, and at a bag: bulging out loosely like a bag; puffy; the other to the valve-disk. as, a baggy umbrella.

Bag-reef (bagʻréf), n. The lowest reef of a Bagimont's Roll (baj'i-monts rõl), n. The sail. rent-roll of Scotland, made up in 1275 by Bagshot-sand (bag'shot-sand), n. Benemund or Baiamund de Vicci, vulgarly the collective name for a series of beds of called Bagimont, who was sent from Rome siliceous sand, known also as Bagshot-beds, by the pope, in the reign of Alexander III., occupying extensive tracts round Bagshot, to collect the tithe of all the church livings in Surrey, and in the New Forest, Hampin Scotland for an expedition to the Holy shire. They may be separated into three Land. It remained the statutory valuation, divisions, the upper and lower Bagshots, according to which the benefices were taxed, consisting of light-yellow clays, and the till the Reformation. A copy of it as it existed central or Barton and Bracklesham beds, in the reign of James V. is in the Advocates' of dark-green sands and brown clays, the Library, Edinburgh.

whole reposing on London clay. Although Baglo, n. See BAGGALA.

generally devoid of fossils, in some places Bagman (bag'man), n. A name formerly they contain several marine shells.

given to commercial travellers from their Baguet, Baguette (bå-get'), n. (Fr. baguette, travelling on horseback, carrying their a wand, from It. bacchetta, from L. baculus, samples or wares in saddle-bags: now used a rod, the dim. term. -ette and -etta being only as conveying somewhat of contempt. substituted for the L. dim, suffix -ulus.] In Bagnet (bag'net), n. An interwoven net in arch. a little round moulding like the astrathe form of a bag for catching fish.

gal, called when plain a bead, when enriched Bagnio (bän'yo), n. (It. bagno, from L. with foliage a chaplet. balneum, a bath.] 1. A bath; a house for Bag-wig (bag'wig), n. A large wig with a bathing, cupping, sweating, and otherwise bag attached to it. See BAG, 3. cleansing the body.-2. A brothel; a stew. Bah (bà), interj. An exclamation expressing Bagnolian (bag-noʻli-an), n. (From Bag. contempt, disgust, or incredulity. noles, in Languedoc, where the heresy had

Twenty-five years ago the vile ejaculation, bah! its rise.) One of a sect of French heretics

was utterly unknown to the English public. of the eighth century who rejected the

De Quincey. whole of the old and part of the New Bahar, Barre (bä-här, bä'rā), n. An East Testaments

Indian measure of weight, varying considerBagpipe (bag'pīp), n. A musical wind-in ably in different localities, and in accordance strument of very great antiquity, having

with the substances weighed, the range been used among the Hebrews and Greeks, being from 223 to 625 lbs. and being a favourite instrumentoverEurope Baide (bād), pret. of bide, to stay, and bide, generally in fifteenth century,

to endure; to withstand.

He

aide the continues in use among the country people brunt.' Burns. (Scotch.)

[graphic]
[graphic]

In geol.

[graphic]

BAGGAGE

Baft (haft), (Pers.) A blue of white cat

ton used in the India trade. Bag (bag), 1. (Icel. baggi, böggr, a bag, a bundle; A. Sax bælg, a bag, belly: Goth balge, a pouch. The word seems to be both Teutonic and Celtic; comp. 0.Fr. bague, a bundle, Gael . bag, balg, a bag or wallet

. See BELLY, BULGE.) 1 A sack; a wallet; a pouch, usually of cloth or leather, to put anything in, as corn, money, &c.—2 A sas or receptacle in animal bodies containing some fluid or other substance; as, the honey, bag of a beé. 3. A sort of silken purse formerly tied to men's hair. 'A dob wig and black sílken bag tied to it.' Addison. 4. What is contained in a bag; in the language of sportsmen, the animals bagged or obtained; in com. a determinate quantity of a commodity such as it is customary to carry to market in a sack; as, a bag of pepper or hops; a bag of corn. - - Bag and spoon, an arrangement used in dredging for river sand, and consisting of a bag attached by the mouth to an iron hoop which is fastened to a long pole, by means of which it is sunk to the bottom of the river and dragged along 30 that the bag is filled. - Bay of bones, & familiar expression denoting a very lean

Such a limping bag of bones as I was.' Dickens. To give one the bag, to dismiss a person from one's employment.

Bunyan. (Now used only colloquially.) Bag (bag) v.t. pret

. & pp. bagged; ppr.

person.

By. Hall.

bagging. 1. To put into a bag;

as, to bag hops. 2. To load with bags. - To distend, as a bag; to swell.

How doth unwelcome dropsy bag up his eyes. 4. To seize, capture, or entrap; to shoot or otherwise lay hold of; as, to bag thirty brace of grouse. (Colloq.) Bag (bag), v.i. 1. To swell or hang like 3

Į bag.

His frill and neck-cloth hung limp under his bagging waistcoat.

Thackeray. 2. To grow big with child.

Then Venus shortly bagged, and ere long was Cupid bred.

Warner Bag (bag), v.t. To cut with a reaping-hook

or scythe: used especially of cutting pease. Halliwell. [Provincial.] Bag (bag), rh A flue in a porcelain oven ascending on the internal side and entering the oven about 4 feet above the sole. B.X. Knight. Bagasse (ba-gas), . [Fr.] The sugar-cane in its dry crushed state as delivered from the sugar-mill Its only nse is as fuel in heating the boilers and pans in the sugarmanufactory. Called also Cane-trash. Bagatelle (bag-a-tel'), Th

. (Ft., from 1! bagatella, a dim. of bagata, a triffe

. Diez supposes it comes from LL. baga, O.I'r. bague, a bundle, so that bagatelle means any little thing one possesses. See BAG. 1. A trifle; a thing of no importance.

Heaps of hair rings and cypber'd seals:

Rích triles, Scripts ead/lzz. 2. A game played on a board having at the end nine holes, into which balls are to be struck with a cue or mace resembling those used in billiards. Bagatelle-board (bag'a-tel-bõrd), 1. A

board on which to play at bagatelle Bag-filter (bag'Hi-têr), 1. A filter med in sugar-refining to clear saccharine solutions of feculencies and inpurities suspended in them, and consisting of a series of sieves or strainers through which the solutions pass

into one or more flannel bags, from which
the juice drips down into a receiver below.
Baggage (bag'aj), 7.. (Fr. bagage, baggage,
0.11. bague, a bundle See Bag.) i. The
tents, clothing, utensils, and other neces-
saries of an army, or other body of men on
the move.-2 The clothing or other belong.
nigs which a traveller carries with him ons
ourney, not usually called luggage in this
country, though baguge is still the common
word in Americk Mounting the baronet's
agpage on the maf of the coach. Thackeray,
Having dispatched my hayrane by water

Altdorf Case-Bag and baggage, all
ne's belongings or property
Dolabe dested when his aliisgren desperate
Egypc, bo pack og hy and her and sat for

Arthat geage (51) F. Bagane, It. bap on , atsmite, a strumpet.

douliai 4 low worthless woman;

ch, chain;

ch, Sc. loch;

8. go; j, job; n, Fr. ton;

ng, sing;

TH, then; th, thin

a seg may angking of hers

... Safwey.

BAKE

BAIL

204

BAKE

[blocks in formation]

dows-meat, Bake-meat (bákt'mēt, bak'.

tl Meat cooked in an oven.
Art, Horatio; the funeral baded-meats
N malayfurash forth the marriage tables. Shak.
la ke uppermost basket there was of all manner
distant for Pharach.

Gen. xl. 17.
!! beat-pie.
Ta sest as if a man should know what food is
mens sa Asked-weat afore it is cut up. Old play.
trhouse (lákhous), n. A house or build-

Je Taylor

og bar baking
ben (bákón), pp. Same as Baked. [Old and
pecial English and Scotch.]
Lad he looked, and, behold, there was a cake

1 Ki. xix. 6.
ata on the coals
baker (takér)

, a. 1. One whose occupation is
i bake bread, biscuit, &c.—2. A small tin
stan in which baking is performed. -3. The

Balaniceps rex popular name of the flesh-fly (Sarcophaga smaria). -- Baker's dozen, thirteen reckmed sa dozen. It is customary for bakers, Balænidæ (ba-lē'ni-dē), n. 2

whales, a family of marine be some other tradesmen, to give 13 for

prising the largest existing A the extra piece being called among

the place of teeth is supp bakers the is-bread or to-bread. Brewer says

whalebone attached to th the custom originated when heavy penalties

the name of whalebone who vere inflicted for short weights, bakers pving the extra bread to secure themselves.

the family. Teeth are, ho -Baset's itch, a species of psoriasis or scall,

the fætus, though they ne scalled when it is confined to the back of

The Balænidæ may be divi the hand it often appears in bakers.

tions—the smooth whales, Pala's salt, subcarbonate of ammonia, or

smoothness of skin and meling salts, so called from its being used

dorsal fin, as the Greenlar by bakers as a substitute for yeast in the

(Balæna mysticetus); ar minutacture of some of the finer kinds of

whales, in which the skin

the dorsal fin present, as Balker-foot (bák'ér-fyt), n. An ill-shaped or

salus), hump-backed wh: istorted ioot Bow-legs and baker.feet.'

and rorquals or piked wha

See WHALE. Baker-legged (bük'er-legd), a. Disfigured Balænoptera (ba- lē- no bi biting crooked legs, or legs that bend

balæna, a whale, and GP

The rorquals or piked w Bakery (bák'er-i), 11. 1 The trade of a baker.

Balænidæ characterized 1 1 A place used for the business of baking

fin, whence the membe

called inders, although Bekestert (bákóstėr), n. (A. Sax. bæcestre,

priately applied to the ger a female baker, becere being a male baker:

Balænoptera are active, tre la generally a feminine suffix.) A baker,

size - sometimes 80 to 1 properly a female baker. In Scotland com

comparatively valueless minis written baxter; as, baster wives.

BALENIDÆ. "Brewesteres and bakesteres. Piers Plowo- Balalaika (hal - a -li' ka

instrument of very ancier

common among the Rus in de quantity baked at once; as, a baking and, according to Nieb

and Arabia. It is of th has only two strings, of used to produce the air

monotonous bass. 4 demand for balshish meets the traveller Bala Limestone (bā'la

BALA-BEDS.

Balance (bal'ans), n. [F Belial), n (Corn.] A mine.–Bal-captain, implement for weighin

scales or dishes suspend twice or double, and la of a balance.] 1. An ir taining the weight of be and simplest form it c lever suspended exactl pivot near its centre of or basin hung to each e equal weight. The anne the common balance.

und at the knees.

the futile footsteps, Westminster Hall, with straws in their shoes, and whose occupation is not by any

civil officer or functionary, subordinate to Heav'n has lent.' Burns. [Old English and means gone now-a-days, are always in attendance in

some one else. There are several kinds Scotch. ] a philanthropic eagerness to render service to suffer. of bailiffs, whose offices widely differ, but Baisemainst (bāz'mânz), n. [Fr. baiser, to ing humanity-or in other words, to become bail all agree in this, that the keeping or pro kiss, and main, the hand.] Compliments; where bail is wanted, for a gratuity of half-a-crown to twelve and sixpence.

tection of something belongs to them. The respects. Spenser. G. A. Sala.

sheriff is the monarch's bailiff, and his Bait (bāt), v.t. [A Scandinavian word; 0.E. 5. Custody; keeping. 'Silly Faunus, now county is a bailiwick. The name is also ap baiten, beiten, Icel. beita, to make to eat, to within their bail. Spenser. - To admit to plied to the chief magistrates of some towns, feed, also to bait, as a hook, to hunt, as with bail, or to take bail for, to release upon per

to keepers of royal castles, as of Dover, to hounds or hawks, beit, a pasture, beita, a sons coming forward as bail.--To find bail, to persons having the conservation of the bait; A. Sax. batan, batian, to bait, bat, a procure persons to act as bail for one.To peace in hundreds and in some special juris bit, bait; G. beize, hawking, beizen, to hawk go bail, (a) to act as bail or surety.

(6) To

dictions, as Westminster, and to the return --all from the stem of E. bite (which see). ] vouch for (a thing); as, I'll go bail for that. ing-officers in the same. But the officials 1. To put a bait on or in; as, to bait a hook, -To hold to bail, to oblige to find bail. commonly designated by this name are the line, or snare. To perfect or justify bail, to prove by the

bailiffs of sheriffs, or sheriffs' officers, who Many sorts of fishes feed upon insects, as is well oath of the person that he is worth the sum execute processes, &c., and bailiffs of liber known to anglers, who ba it their hooks with them.

Ray. for which he is surety beyond his debts. ties, appointed by the lords in their respec

2. To allure by a bait; to catch; to capti. To stand bail, to act as bail or surety. tive jurisdictions to perform similar func

vate. tions.-2. An overseer or under-steward on

*To bait fish.' Shak. Do their gay Bail (bāl), n. [It is probable that here we

vestments his affections bait?' Shak. have two words of different origins under an estate, appointed to manage forests,

3. To give a portion of food and drink to a direct husbandry operations, collect rents, one form--the one from 0. Fr. baille, the outer barrier of a fortification (see BAILEY), &c.: also called a Bailiff of Forests, or Bailiff

beast, especially upon the road; as, to bait

horses. the other from L. baculum, baculus, a rod in Husbandry.--3. An inferior officer in

The sun, that measures heaven all day long. or staff.) 1. An advanced post outside the trusted with the government of a city or

At night doth bait his steeds the ocean waves among. solid defences of a town.-2. A certain limit district; a governor.

Spenser within a forest.- 3. A post; a bar; specifi Lausanne is under the canton of Berne, governed 4. To provoke and harass by dogs; as, to bait cally, a term properly applied to the stumps by a bailill, sent every three years from the senate a buli or a boar. *As chained bear whom or wickets at cricket, but now to the little

of Berne.

Addison, cruel dogs do bait.' Spenser. Hence-5. To sticks, about 4 inches long, laid on the tops -Bailiffs of forests and bailiffs in husban harass in any way; to annoy. of the stumps, one end resting in the groove dry. See above, definition 2.- Water bailiffs, The new secretary of state had been so unmerci. of one stump and the other in that of the officers who protect rivers from poachers

fully baited by the paymaster of the forces ... that next. As they fall with the slightest blow, and from being fished at illicit seasons.

he was thoroughly sick of his situation. Macaulay. they serve to indicate when the stumps Bailiwick (bâ'li-wik), n. [O. Fr. bailli, a Bait (băt), v.i. To take a portion of food have been struck.

bailiff, and O.E. wick, A. Sax, wic, a village, and drink for refreshment on a journey. Brown gravely set up the middle stump again and dwelling, &c.) The precincts in which a

In all our journey from London to his house we put the bails on.

T Hughes. bailiff has jurisdiction; the limits of a bailiff's did not so much as bait at a Whig inn. Addison. 4. A division between the stalls of a stable.

authority, as a hundred, a liberty, a forest, Bait (bât), n. [See BAIT, v.t.] 1. Any sub5. The handle of a kettle.- 6. One of the Bailliage (bā'li-āj), n. (Fr.) A bailiwick. over which a bailiff is appointed.

stance used to catch fish or other animals hoops supporting the tilt of a boat.

by alluring them to swallow a hook or to be [Rare.] Bail (bāl), v.t. (Fr. baille. It. baglia, a tub

caught in snares or in an inclosure or net.

At first four bailliages were created. Brougham, or bucket, perhaps from Armor. bal, a tub;

2. An allurement; enticement; temptation. but the word also occurs in the Teutonic Baillie. See BAILIE.

The chief bait which attracted a needy sycophant languages; D. balie, a bucket, uitbalien, to Bailliet n. Custody; government; juris to the court was the hope of obtaining, as the reward

diction. bale out; Dan. balle, ballie, a tub.) To free

of servility and flattery, a royal letter to an heiress.

Macaulay. from water with a bucket or pail; as, to bail Bailment (bál'ment), n. In law, the act of bailing; the delivery of goods in trust upon

3. A portion of food and drink, or a refresha boat. Spelled also Bale.

ment taken on a journey. Bailable (bal'a-bl), a. 1. Capable of being

a contract, expressed or implied, that the set free upon bond with sureties; capable of trust shall be faithfully executed.

If you grow dry before you end your business, pray Bailor, n. being admitted to bail: used of persons.

See BAILER.

take a bait here: I've a fresh hogshead for you.

B. Jonson. 2. Admitting of bail; as, a bailable offence. Bailpiece (bāl'pēs), n. In law, a slip of parch: Bait (băt), v.i. [Fr. battre, to beat, battre de Bailage (bál'aj), n. Same as Balliage (which

ment or paper containing a recognizance of l'aile, to flap or flutter, from L. L. batere, L.

bail above or to the action. see).

batuere, to beat.) To clap the wings; to Bailbond (bál'bond), n. A bond or obliga- Bail-scoop (bāl’sköp), n.

A large scoop or flutter as if to fly; to hover as a hawk above tion given by a prisoner and his surety, to trough, which can be raised and depressed

her prey. "Kites that bait and beat.' Shak. insure the prisoner's appearance in court at on pivots, and is used for bailing out water.

Bait (bât), n. White-bait, a small fish of the the return of the writ.

Baily (ha'li), n. A contraction for Bailiff or Thames. See WHITE-BAIT.

for Bailiwick. Bailee (bål-e'), n. (See BAIL, in law.] In

Baith (bath), a., pron. or conj. Both. law, the person to whom goods are commit Bain, t Bainet (bán), n. [Fr. bain, from L.

(Scotch.) ted'in trust, and who has a temporary posbalneum, a bath.) A bath. Mir. for Mags. Baiting (bāt'ing), n.

1. The act of furnishsession and a qualified property in them, Bain, t Bainet (ban), v.t. To bathe. Lodge.

ing a bait. -2. Refreshment, as on a journey. for the purposes of the trnst. Bainberg (bằnberg), n. [G. bein-bergen, Bait-mill (băt'mil), n.

A mill used by Bailer, Bailor (bāl'er, bál'or), 11. In law, shin-guard.] One of the greaves or jambs American Åshermen for cutting mackerel one who delivers goods to another in trust first used by the military as an additional

or salted herrings into small pieces for bait. for some particular purpose. protection, less vulnerable than the chain

It consists of a roller armed with knives Bailer (bảl'er), n. One who bails or frees

mail with which the body was protected. and inclosed in an upright wooden box, and from water; anything used to bail out water, Bainle (bân'i),a. Having large bones; strong;

is worked by a crank on the outside. especially a small shallow vessel with a bony. “The brawnie, vainie ploughman Baittle (bāt'tl), n. [Icel. beit, pasture. See handle made for the purpose. chiel.' Burns. [Scotch.) Written also Banie.

BAIT, v.t.] Rich pasture. [Scotch.) Bailey (bál'i), n. [0. Fr. baille, a palisade, a Bain-marie (bat-ma-rē), n. (Fr., from L.

Baize (báz), n. (A modified spelling of a barrier, from L.L. ballium, a corruption of balneum, a bath, and maris, of the sea.) A

plural form; O.E. bayes, O.Fr. baye, Fr. L. vallum, a rampart, from L. vallus, a stake.]

large shallow vessel containing hot water, baie, coarse woollen cloth; D. boi, boy, Dan. The name given to the courts of a castle in which sauce-pans are placed to warm

baj; from L. badius, bay-coloured, from the formed by the spaces between the circuits food; a water-bath.

original colour of the fabric, or from Fr. of walls or defences which surrounded the Bainst (bänz). Same as Banns. Spenser.

baie, a berry, from being originally dyed with keep. The Old Bailey in London got its Bairam, Beiram (bâ'ram, bi'ram), 11.

Avignon berries. A coarse woollen stuff name thus. [Turk. and Per.) The name of two Moham

with a long nap, sometimes friezed on one Bailiary, Baillierie (bā'li-a-ri, bā'li-er-i), n. medan festivals, of which one is held, in

side. In Scots law, the extent of a bailie's juris

imitation of the Easter of the Christian Bajadere (bä'yä-dêr), n. Same as Bayadeer diction. - Letter of bailiary, a commission

Church, at the close of the fast Ramazan, (which see) by which an heritable proprietor, entitled

and the other seventy days after. The latter Bajimont's Roll (baj'i-monts rôl), 1. Samne to grant such a commission, appoints a baron is called the lesser Bairam, and is com

as Bagimont's Roll. bailie, with the usual powers, to hold courts, memorative of the offering of Isaac.

bread, &c.; a bakehouse.

[ocr errors]

Balding (bák’ing), n. 1. The act of baking.

Balzhish, Buksheish (bak’shësh, buk'slash), (Per, bakkekish, from bakkshidan, to give.) A present or gratuity; over-money. everywhere in the East from Turkey and Leypt to Hindustan

FO

A mine-
Balaam (bä'lam), n. Printer's cant for
mister regarding marvellous and incredible
eventa inserted in a newspaper to fill out
place, and evidently an allusion to Balaam's
speaking with man's voice' (Num. xxii

.
); vamp.–Balaam-box, the depositary for
rejected articles, not rarely the fire.
Bala-beda (böla-bedz),

1,7. pl. In geol. a series
obeles occurring at Bala, in Merionethshire,

rests in a horizontal po in the Caradoc formation of the lower Silurian. They consist of about 35 feet of richly Posziliferous limestone in two bands, and below it sandstones, slates, and ashbeda of 5000 or 6000 feet in thickness. Balachong (harla-chong), n. (Malay bulatada) A substance composed of small tahes or shrimps pounded up with salt and spices and then dried. It is much sued in the East as a condiment for rice. Balena (ba-låna), . [L; Gr. phalaina, a Whale | A genus of aquatic mammals, lanly Balanida, including the Greenland or

Arleida, about 24 feetin height, with a large pendicular slender

Bajoccho (bå-yokko), 11. (It.) A copper appoint officers under him, &c.

Bairmant (bárman), 11. [Bair, bare, and coin which was current in the Papal States, Bailie, Baillie (bā'li), n. (See BAILIFF.) A

man.] In old law, a debtor sworn in court of the value of about id. municipal officer or magistrate in Scotland, not to be in possession of property worth

The hat went round, and the bajochi tumbled corresponding to an alderman in England. 58. 5d.

into it,

Thackeray, He possesses a certain jurisdiction by com

Bairn (barn), 12. [A. Sax. bearn, O. E, barn, mon law as well as by statute. The criminal Icel. Goth. barn- lit. one who is born, from Bajury, Bajra (baj'u-ri, baj'ra), n. [Hind )

A species of grain (Roleus spicatus) much jurisdiction of the provost and bailies of bear, to bring forth.) A child. (Northern

used in the East Indies for feeding horses royal burghs extends to breaches of the English and Scotch.)

and cattle. peace, drunkenness, adulteration of articles Think, like good Christians, on your bairns and Bake (bāk), v.t. pret. and pp. baked; ppr. of diet, thefts not of an aggravated charac wives.

Dryden.

baking. [A. Sax. bacan, Icel, and Sw. baka. ter, and other offences of a less serious As she annunciated to her dairns the upshot of her

Dan. bage, D. bakken, G. backen, to bake; of nature, Formerly a person appointed by

practical experience she pulled from her pocket the
portions of tape which showed the length and

cognate origin with Gr. phôgein, to roast.) precept of sasine to give infeftment in land

breadth of the various rooms at the hospital house. 1. To dry and harden by heat, either in an -a legal formality now abolished-was also

T'rollone. oven, kiln, or furnace, or by the solar rays; called a bailie.

-Bairns' part of gear. Same as Legitim as, to bake bricks; to bake the ground, Bailiff (balif), n. 10. Fr. baillif, bailli; Sc. (which see). (Shakspere uses this word in 2. To prepare as food in an oven; as, to bake bailie; L.L. ballivus, baillivus. 'Baillif, the form barn (which see). ]

bread; to bake meat.-& To harden with which is the old form, is an adjective taken Bairntime (bârn'tim), * [A. Sax. bearn cold. Tlie earth, .. is baked with frost.' substantively, and is formed from baillir team, a family-bearn, a child, and team; Shak. (same as bailler), to hold, to govern.' 0.E. barn- tem, progeny See TEEM.) A They dake their sides upon the cold hard stone. Littre. See BAIL, to deliver over.) 1. A family of children. The bonny bairntime

Spexrr.

Common right whale (B. mysticatus) and such species sagtee with it in having no dorsal fins a

of turning on the cent bosh belly, and whalebone in the mouth.

are the scales, which

points A and B. the e Balaniceps (ba-lēni-seps), n. [L. balana,

called the centres of "Whale, and caput, a head.) A genuis of

between the centres birds containing the B. rex, or whale-headed

rectly above the cent Stork A. gigantie grallatorial bird, family

from the upper surf heak, somewhat resembling the boat-bill. It has been found in the interior of Africa, to the top of the

which, when the be In the upper part of the White Nile. Its whole is suspende late, Mas, hooked bill, longer than its head,

structed balance t) th, chain; eh, 8c. lock; B.go; j, job; 6, Fr. ton;

WA BALENA

oil, pound;

ü, Sc. abune; 9, Sc. fey.

BAKE

[blocks in formation]

Heav'n has lent' Burns. [Old English and

Date to

kinds Scotch.)
er, but Baisemainst (házémånz), R. (Fr, baiser, to
or pro-kiss, and main, the hand.] Compliments;
a. The respects. Spenser.
nd his Bait (bát), t.t. [A Scandinavian word; 0.E.
ilso ap- baiten, beiten, Icel, beita, to make to eat, to
towns, feed, also to bait, as a hook, to hunt, as with
ver, to

hounds or hawks, beit, a pasture, beita, a
of the bait; A. Sax, bütan, batian, to bait, bat, a
1 juris- bit, bait; G. beize, hawking, beizen, to hawk
return --all from the stem of E. bite (which see}]
officials

1. To put a bait on or in; as, to bait a hook,
ure the line, or snare.
3, who

Many sorts of fishes feed upon insects, as is well
i liber known to anglers, who bait their books with them.

Ray.
respec-

2. To allure by a bait; to catch; to capti-
func-
ard on

vate. "To bait Ash' Shak. "Do their gay
'orests,

vestments his affections bait! Sluk rents,

3. To give a portion of food and drink to a
Bailif beast, especially upon the road; as, to buit

horses.
The sun, that measures heaven all day long,
At night doth baú his steeds the ocean waves among.

SPENSET
'overned

4. To provoke and harass by dogs; as, to bait e senate a bull or a boar. *As chained bear whom son,

cruel dogs do bait.' Spenser. Hence–6. To
1a8ban-

harass in any way; to annoy.
bailiffs,
Jachers

Cer in-
city or

t upon

The new secretary of state had been so unmerci.

fully baited by the paymaster of the forces ... that ns,

he was thoroughly sick of his situation. Macaulay. ailli, a Bait (bāt), o... To take a portion of food village, and drink for refreshment on a journey. hich a

In all our journey from London to his house we bailiff's did not so much as bait at a Whig inn. Addison, forest, Bait (bāt), n. (See Bait, v.l) 1. Any sub

stance used to catch fish or other animals liwick.

by alluring them to swallow a hook or to be

caught in snares or in an inclosure or net. ugham.

2. An allurement; enticement; temptation

The chief bait which attracted a needy sycophant juris to the court was the hope of obtaining, as the reward

of servility and flattery, a royal letter to an heiress. act of

Macaulay, 3. A portion of food and drink, or a refreshi

ment taken on a journey. at the

If you grow dry before you end your business, pray take a bait here: I've a fresh hogshead for you,

B. Forsen
parch.

Bait (bát), v.i. (Fr. battre, to beat, battre de
l'aile, to flap or flutter, from L.L. batere, L.

|
batuere, to beat] To clap the wings; to

Antter as if to fly; to hover as a hawk abore ressed

her prey. 'Kites that bait and beat.' Shal. vater. Bait (hat), 1. White-bait

, a small fish of the
Biff or Thames. See WHITE-BAIT.

Baith (bath), l., pron. or conj. Both.
m L. [Scotch.]
Hlaga. Baiting (bāt'ing), 11. 1. The act of furnish-
odge.

ing a bait.--2. Refreshment, as on a journey.
rgen, Bait-mill (bât'mil), n.
ional
Dain-
d.
Ongi

Bake (bâk), v.i. 1. To do the work of baking. is useful to it in capturing and crushing the

a hori I keep his house, and I wash, wring, brew, bake, lizards and other reptiles on which it feeds. either and do all mysell. Shal.

Very s 2. To be baked; to dry and harden in heat;

scale as, the bread bakes; the ground bakes in a

the hd hot sun.

beam Baked-meat, Bake-meat (bākt'mēt, bāk'

equal mét), n. 1. Meat cooked in an oven.

being Thrift, thrift, Horatio; the funeral baked-meats

arms Did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables. Shak.

the be In the uppermost basket there was of all manner

a sligt of bake-meits for Pharaoh. Gen. xl. 17.

of sus 2. A meat-pie.

gravit

straig You speak as if a man should know what food is

be al coffined'in a baked-meat afore it is cut up. Old play.

centi Bakehouse (bāk’hous), n. A house or build

shoul ing for baking

Alloy Baken (bāk'n), pp. Same as Baked. (Old and

whick provincial English and Scotch.)

tions And he looked, and, behold, there was a cake

In R baker on the coals, I Ki. xix. 6.

pensi Baker (bāk'ėr), n. 1. One whose occupation is

point to bake bread, biscuit, &c.-2. A small tin

to on oven in which baking is performed.-3. The

to be popular name of the flesh-fly (Sarcophaga

Balæniceps rex.

bean carnaria). - - Baker's dozen, thirteen reck

posit oned as a dozen. It is customary for bakers, Balænidæ (ba-lē'ni-dė), 1. pl. The toothless

suspe like some other tradesmen, to give 13 for whales, a family of marine mammals, com

arm 12, the extra piece being called among prising the largest existing animals, in which

so ad bakers the in-bread or to-bread. Brewer says

the place of teeth is supplied by plates of short the custom originated when heavy penalties whalebone attached to the palate, whence

site E were inflicted for short weights, bakers the name of whalebone whales often given to

is, 17 giving the extra bread to secure themselves.

the family. Teeth are, however, present in -As - Baker's itch, a species of psoriasis or scall, the foetus, though they never cut the gum.

opera so called when it is confined to the back of

The Balænidæ may be divided into two sec Such the hand. It often appears in bakers.

tions—the smooth whales, characterized by extre

smoothness of skin and the absence of a Baker's salt, subcarbonate of ammonia, or

glass dorsal fin, as the Greenland or right whale

air. smelling salts, so called from its being used by bakers as a substitute for yeast in the

(Balæna mysticetus); and the furrowed - Be manufacture of some of the finer kinds of whales, in which the skin is furrowed and

whic bread. the dorsal fin present, as the finners (Phy

arm salus), hump-backed whales (Megaptera),

ther Baker-foot (băk'ér-fyt), n. An ill-shaped or distorted foot. “Bow-legs and baker-feet."

and rorquals or piked whales (Balænoptera). ated See WHALE.

elect Jer. Taylor.

(L.

bala Baker-legged (bāk'er-legd), a. Disfigured Balænoptera (ba - lē- nop'tėr-a), n.

balona, a whale, and Gr. pteron, a wing.) havi by having crooked legs, or legs that bend

The rorquals or piked whales, a genus of inward at the knees.

equa Balænidæ characterized by a dorsal adipose the Bakery (bāk'ér-i), n. 1. The trade of a baker.

fin, whence the members are sometimes the 2. A place used for the business of baking

called finners, although this term is appro weig bread, &c.; a bakehouse. priately applied to the genus Physalus. The

the Bakestert (bāk'ster), 1. [A. Sax. boecestre,

Balænoptera are active, attain a gigantic the a female baker, becere being a male baker:

size-- sometimes 80 to 100 feet - but yield bear stre is generally a feminine suffix.) A baker,

See

comparatively valueless whalebone. properly a female baker. In Scotland com

proc BALÆNIDÆ.

dies monly written baxter; as, baxter wives. Balalaika (hal - a - lī' ka), n. A musical

mak 'Brewesteres and bakesteres.' Piers Plow

instrument of very ancient Slavonian origin, chal man.

fron common among the Russians and Tartars, Baking (bik'ing), n. 1. The act of baking. and, according to Niebuhr, also in Egypt

pon 2. The quantity baked at once; as, a balcing and Arabia. It is of the guitar kind, but

HYI of bread, has only two strings, of which one only is

(wh Bakshish, Buksheish (bak'shēsh, buk'used to produce the air, the other giving a

BAL shesh), 12. (Per. bakkshish, from bakkshidan, monotonous bass.

pari to give.] Apresent or gratuity; over-money. Bala Limestone (bā'la lîm'ston), n. See

anc A demand for bakshish meets the traveller

BALA-BEDS. everywhere in the East from Turkey and

Balance (bal'ans), n. (Fr., from L. bilanx, an Egypt to Hindustan.

implement for weighing composed of two Bal(bal), n. {Corn.) A mine.–Bal-captain, scales or dishes suspended from a beam-bis,

tha a mine-captain.

twice or double, and lana, a dish, the scale bal Balaam (bå'lam), n. Printer's cant for

of a balance.] 1. An instrument for ascermatter regarding marvellous and incredible taining the weight of bodies. In its original

rea events inserted in a newspaper to fill out and simplest form it consists of a beam or

at space, and evidently an allusion to Balaam's lever suspended exactly in the middle on a

difi ass speaking with man's voice' (Num. xxii. pivot near its centre of gravity, with a scale

me 30); vamp.- Balaam-box, the depositary for or basin hung to each extremity of precisely

A is rejected articles, not rarely the fire. equal weight. The annexed figure represents

the Bala-beds (bā'la-bedz), n. pl. In geol. a series the common balance. A B is the beam, which

equ of beds occurring at Bala, in Merionethshire,

rests in a horizontal position, and is capable ad in the Caradoc formation of the lower

prc Silurian. They consist of about 35 feet of

FO

bat richly fossiliferous limestone in two bands, and below it sandstones, slates, and ash

B

La beds of 5000 or 6000 feet in thickness.

HE Balachong (baola-chong), T. [Malay Mala

TH chân.] A substance composed of small

M fishes or shrimps pounded up with salt

6. and spices and then dried. It is much

eq used in the East as a condiment for rice. Balæna (ba-lē'na), n. (L. ; Gr. phalaina, a

of a whale. ] A genus of aquatic mammals,

stit family Balænido, including the Greenland or

Common Balance, right whale (B. mysticetus) and such species as agree with it in having no dorsal fius, a of turning on the centre of motion c. D and E 7. smooth belly, and whalebone in the mouth. are the scales, which are suspended from the lat See BALÆNIDÆ.

points A and B, the extremities of the beam, Balæniceps (ba-le'ni-seps), n. [L. balana, called the centres of suspension, Midway ba a whale, and caput, a head.] A genus of between the centres of suspension, and di. 8. birds containing the B. rex, or whale-headed rectly above the centre of motion, there rises La stork, a gigantic grallatorial bird, family from the upper surface of the beam a perArdeidæ, about 31 feet in height, with a large pendicular slender stem called the tongue, po beak, somewhat resembling the boat-bill. which, when the beam is horizontal, points It has been found in the interior of Africa, to the top of the handle F, by which the fic in the upper part of the White Nile.

Its

whole is suspended. In a properly con pc large, fat, hooked bill, longer than its head, structed balance the beam should rest in

[graphic]
[graphic]

nce of

pop or

on

HOL ma

one

nie.

ter,

in

one

[ocr errors]

umbs

A mill used by American fishermen for cutting mackerel or salted herrings into small pieces for bait

.
It consists of a roller arnied with knives
and inclosed in an upright wooden box, and

is worked by a crank on the outside.
man Baittle (battl), 7 (Icel, bei, pasture. See

BAIT, v.d.) Rich pasture. Scotch.
L Baize (baz), n. (A modified spelling of 3

plural form; 0.È, bayes, O.FT. baye, Fr.
baie, coarse woollen cloth; D. boi, boy, Dan.
baj; from L. badirs, bay-coloured, from the
original colour of the fabric, or from Fr.
baie, a berry, from being originally dyed with
Avignon herries.) A coarse woollen stuff
with a long nap, sometimes friezed on one

side.
an Bajadere (bä'yä-der), *h. Same as Bayadeer

(which see)
er Bajimont's Roll (baj'i-monts rõl), 11. Same

as Bagimont's Roll
Bajoccho (ba-yok'ko), 14. (It.) A copper
coin which was current in the Papal States,
of the value of about 3d.
The hat went round, and the bæjedh tumbled

Thackeray,
Bajury, Bajra (baju-, baj'ra), n. {Hind]
A species of grain (1lolcus spicatus) mach
used in the East Indies for feeding horses
and cattle
Bake (bák), v.t. pret

. and pp. baked; ppr
baking. [A. Sax bacan, Iceland Sw. bala,
Dan. bage, D. bakken, G. backen, to bake; of
cognate origin with Gr. phögein, to roast.)
1. To dry and harden by beat, either in an
oven, kiln, or furnace, or by the solar says:
as, to bake bricks; to bako the ground.
2. To prepare as food in an oven; as, to bake
bread; to take meat.-3. To harden with

The earth ... is baked with frost.
Shar.
They iake their sides upon the cold hard stone.

Sponser:

into it.

of an

[graphic][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

Ü, Sc. abune; }, Sc. fey.

« AnteriorContinuar »