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BALCONY

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respecting from the front of a building, covering on four columns of n
sported by colunins, pillars, or consoles, or a canopy hanging from the
di cacoppassed with a balustrade, railing, high altar in some churches,

over a bed to which curtains
(e) A canopy or covering abe
kings,imperial personages, bis
ecclesiastical dignitaries. 'TI
baldaquino prepared to rec
emperors.' Thackeray.

The bed is like the baldaquin
Sometimes spelled Baldequi
Bald-buzzard (bald buz-zar
sometimes given in Americ
or fish-hawk (Pandion Hali
PREY.
Bald-eagle (bald'e-gl), n.
Baldequin (bal'de-kin), n.

chino.
Balder (bal'dêr), 1. [Icel.
baldor, a prince or hero.)

the son of Odin, the your 2 perapet . Balconies are common before

god of eloquence and just d TEIWI –2. The projecting gallery in the Balderdash (bal' der-daslı

also Baldur.
sterior of a building, as of a theatre.-
The stern gallery in a large ship.

from Dan, balder, noise, c all (tald), a. [O.E. balled, ballida word

Dan. dask, a slap, a dash & rery doubtful etymology. The old Eng.

W. baldordus, prattling, prattle.] 1. Senseless pr

erne.

Balcony.

on

power. When a few of the leading powers balance may be connected with the interior Balanites (bal-a-ni'těz), n. 1. A small genas
of a number of separate and sovereign states of a Leyden-jar or battery, and the cone b of plants, nat. order Simarubese, containing
counterpoise each other the balance of power with the exterior, and the attractive power two species, which are small spiny trees,
is maintained, and the safety of the sinaller

of any charge at any found in desert places in Asia and Africa. states secured. The leading rule by which

variable distance The oval fruits are purgative; they contain this has been effected in Europe has been

between the cones a very hard nut, used in India for fireworks. to oppose every new arrangement which

may be estimated 2. Another name for Balanus, a genus of threatens either materially to augment the

by weights placed cirripeds.

B strength of one of the greater powers or to

in the scale-pan. Balanitis (bal-a-ni'tis), n. [Gr. balanos, an

B diminish that of another. - Balance of trade,

Balance-fish (bal acorn, and term. itis, signifying inflammaa phrase used to denote the relation in respect

ans-fish), n. A spe tion.) A kind of gonorrhea. of amount or value which subsists between

cies of shark, same Balanophoraceæ (bal-a-nof'or-a"se-ē), n.pl. the exportation of domestic productions

Hammer - fish (Gr. balanos, an acorn, and phero, to bear, from a country and the importation of b

(which see)

from the compact terminal heads or cones foreign; or the difference between the

Balance-knife of the flowers.) A curious order of parasitic, amount or value of the commodities ex

E

А

(balans-nīf), n. leafless, flowering plants, which, from their ported and imported. Hence the expression,

kind of table-knife, simple structure, were thought to be allied formerly much more common than now,

which, when laid to the Fungi. There are about thirty known The balance of trade is against or in favour

on the table, rests species grouped into ten genera. They are of a country. Formerly this subject was not

wholly on

the generally of a bright yellow or red colour. well understood, but properly speaking,

handle without the Their small flowers, in most cases unisexual, there cannot be any such thing as a balance

blade touching the are aggregated into dense masses. The fruit of trade for or against a country.

cloth. This is ef is one-celled, with a single seed. One of Balance (balans), v.t. pret. & pp. balanced;

A

fected by making the best-known species is the Cynomorium ppr. balancing. 1. To bring to an equipoise;

the weight of the coccineum, or Fungus melitensis of drug-
as, to balance the weights in the scales of a

handle counterbal gists, which at one time enjoyed a great
balance. Hence-2. To compare by estimat Balance-electrometer. ance that of the reputation as a styptic.
ing the relative force, importance, or value

blade.

Balanus (bai'a-nus), n. (Gr. balanos, a gland of different things; to estimate; to weigh. Balancement (balans-ment), n. The act of or acorn.) A genus of sessile cirripeds, * Balance the good and the evil of things.' balancing, or state of being balanced. Dar.

family Balanidæ, Sir R. L'Estrange.-3. To equal in weight, win.

of great variety force, number, &c.; to serve as a counter- Balance-plough (bal'ans-plou), n. See

of form. The poise to; to be equal to; to counteract; as, PLOUGH.

shell consists of one species of attraction balances another. Balancer (bal'ans-ér), n. One who or that

six plates, with
One expression in the letter must check and balance
which balances; specifically, an organ of an

an operculum of
another.
Kent. insect useful in balancing the body. The

four valves. Co-
balancers are two very fine movable threads,

lonies are to be 4. To settle by paying what remains due on terminated by a kind of oval button placed

found on rocks an account; to equalize or adjust. under the origin of the wings.

left dry at low
Though I am very well satisfied that it is not in my Balance-reef (bal'ans-réf), n. Naut. a reef

water, on ships,
power to balance accounts with my Maker, I am
band that crosses a sail diagonally, used to

on timber,
resolved, however, to turn all my endeavours that
contract it in a storm. A balance-reef is

[graphic]

Tanferts have given rise to the supposition words; ribaldry; noisy no that the word is a participle or adjective

I heard him charge this pub tren ball, rounded and smooth like a ball;

scurrility, billingsgate, and bal sire probably it is from the Celtic root seen 3 Armor , bai, a white mark on an animal's

2. A worthless mixture ivos; ball, a name often given in England "To drink such balderdash to a horse that is bald-faced; Sc. beld or B. Jonson. weiled, from bel or bell, a spot on a horse's Balderdasht (bal'dér-das tae; Ir

, and Gael, bal, a spot.] 1. Destitute adulterate liquors. bair, especially on the top and back of

The wine-merchants of Nice

and even mix it with pigeon's because his head was bald, covered Dat deed with laurels.

[graphic]
[graphic]

dermed; inelegant.

lobsters and way.

Addison.
generally placed in all gaff-sails, the band

other crustace5. To examine or compare by summations, running from the throat to the clew, and

ans, and on the &c., so as to show how assets and liabilities either the upper or the lower half of the

shells of concbi. or debits and credits stand; as, let us balance sail may be reefed.

Group of

fers and other our accounts; we balance our books at the Balance-sheet (bal'ans-shēt), n. A sheet, Balanus tintinnabulum, molluscs. They end of each year.-6. Naut. to contract, as a statement, or account showing the balances

differ from the sail, by rolling up a small part of it at one of a number of accounts; a statement of the members of the genus Lepas (Barnacles) in corner.—7. In engin, to adjust, as a line of assets and liabilities of a trading concern, having a symmetrical shell and in being desroad, railway, or other work, so that the the balance of each open account in the

titute of a flexible stalk. They pass through earth or other material removed from the

ledger being placed under one or other of a larval stage of existence, at which period eminences shall fill up the hollows.--8. In those heads.

they are not fixed, but move about hy means gymnastics, to keep in equilibrium on a very Balance-thermometer(bal'ans-thér-mom' of swimming feet, and possess large stalked narrow basis or small point, as on a tight et-ér), n. An invention by which mercury eyes, both feet and eyes disappearing when rope or the top of a pole; to poise, as an inclosed in a balanced tube is caused to they attach themselves to their final place object with a narrow base, so skilfully that make one or other of the ends preponderate, of repose. Often called A corn-shells. it does not fall; as, to balance a pole upon in order to open or close a window or dam- Balas, Balass (bal'as, bal-as'), n. [Fr. balais, one's chin.-9. To obtain in equal measure. per, or to touch an alarm.

It. balascio, Sp. balax, from Ar. balakhsh, Like souls that balance joy and pain,

Balance-valve (bal'ans-valv), n. A valve a kind of ruby named from Badakhshan, a With tears and smiles from heaven again

in which steam is admitted to both sides so country of Central Asia (called Balasian by The maiden Spring upon the plain

as to render it more readily operated, by Marco Polo).) A variety of spinel ruby, of Came in a sun-lit fall of rain.

Tennyson.

relieving its pressure on the seat. E. H. a pale rose-red colour, sometimes inclining Balance (bal'ans), v.i. 1. To have an equal Knight.

to orange. Its crystals are usually octaweight on each side; to be in equipoise; Balance - wheel (bal'ang-whel), n. That hedrons, composed of two four-sided pyraas, the weights balance exactly.-2. Fig. to part of a watch or chronometer which by mids, applied base to base. See SPINEL hesitate; to fluctuate between motives which the regularity of its motion determines the Balase. To ballast. appear of equal force, as a balance when beat or strike.

Balastre (ba-las'ter), n. The finest variety poised by equal weights. (Rare.)

These are in themselves very objectionable; the of gold cloth. It is manufactured at Vienna

true regulators, the proper dalance-wheels, are those Balaustine (ba-las'tin), n. [Gr. balaustion, He would not balance nor err in the deterinination

which have been described.

Brougham, of his choice. Locke.

a wild-pomegranate flower.) Pertaining to

A wide the wild. pomegranate tree. Balaustine 3. In dancing, to move the body forwards Balandrana (bal-an-drā'na), n. cloak or man

powers, the dried flowers of the pomegranand backwards alternately by an alternate tle, used as an

ate, used in medicine as astringents. movement of the feet.-4. To be employed additional gar

Balaustion (ba-las'ti-on), n. (šee BALAUSin finding the balance or balances on an acment by travel

TINE.) A genus of plants, nat. order Myrcount or accounts. lers and others

tacex, containing one known species, B. pulOh! who would cast and balance at a desk, in the twelfth

cherrimum, a shrub inhabiting south-westPerched like a crow upon a three-leggd stoot, and thirteenth

ern Australia, and said to be one of the most Tennysor. Till all his juice is dried! centuries. Call

beautiful of plants, with numerous flowers Balance-book (bal'ans - byk), n. In com. ed also Super

resembling in shape and colour those of the a book in which the adjusted debtor-and totius.

dwarf pomegranate. creditor accounts have been posted from Balanidæ, Bal

Balay (ba-la), n. Balas (which see). The the ledger. anoidea (bal

word is written in this way to represent Balance-crane (bal'ans-krān), n. A crane ab'i-dē, bal-a

the pronunciation of the French form, having two arms, one of which is pro noi-de'a), n. pl.

balais.) vided with arrangements for counterpois. [Gr. baianos, an

Balbutiatet (bal-bû'shi-át), v. i. (L. balbutio, ing wholly or in part the weight to be acorn,and eidos,

from balbus, stammering.) To stammer in raised by the other. E. H. Knight. likeness.) A fa

speaking. Balance - electrometer (bal' ans-ě- lek. mily of cirri

Balbuties (bal-bû'ti-ēz), n. (Mod. L., from trom"et-ér), n. An instrument constructed peds, of which

L. balbus, stammering.) Stammering. Also, on the principle of the common balance the genus Bal

a vicious and incomplete pronunciation, in and weights to estimate the mutual attrac anus is the type.

which almost all the consonants are retion of oppositely electrified surfaces. A glass The animals of

placed by b and I. Dunglison. pillar is fixed in a stand A, to which the beam this family are

Balcon, Balconet (balkón, bal-ko'nā), n. of a delicate balance B's is suspended at the frequently call

A balcony or gallery. Pepys. point D. A scale-pand is suspended from one ed acorn-shells.

Balconet (balkó-net), n. A low ornamental arm, and just rests upon the support E, like. See BALANUS.

railing to a door or window, projecting but wise insulated and fixed upon the stand A. Balaninus (bal

slightly beyond the threshold or sill. From the other arm is suspended a light gilt a-ni'nus), n. A Balandrana, from MS, in the

Balconied (balko-nid), a. Having balconies, cone a, the base of which is opposed to the genus of the or

British Museum,

The house was double-dalconied. Roper Nerel. base of another inverted cone 6, which may der Coleoptera

Balcony (balkó-ni), n. [It. balcone, from be fixed at any distance from it by sliding and family Curculionidae (which see). One balco, a scaffold, O.H.G balcho, G. balken, upon the insulated pillar d'. The metallic species is called the nut-weevil.

E balk, a bearn.] 1. A stage or platform Fåte, får, fat, fall; mě, met, her; pine, pin; note, not, move; tūbe, tuh, bull; oil, pound; U.Sc, abune; . Sc fey.

moble, or nobly bold.

china.

Addison.

Bald-erne (bald'érn), n. ? Destitute of the natural or usual covering

erne or sea-eagle of Amer d the head or top; as, a bald oak; a bald cocephalus), a species of byuntain 'Thy bald, awful head, O sovran feeds not only on fish Blame!" Coleridge.

geese, and various seaSa question asked him by any of the senators, but

eagle which is emblazon Les stand bald before him.

Shah.

emblem on the standa Destitute of beard or awn; as, bald wheat. States. Destitute of appropriate ornament; un. Bald-faced (bald'fást), e

face or white on the fact Müce) could stoop to a plain style, sometimes as, a bald-faced stag. tve to a bold style.

Macaulay. Bald-head (bald hed), i. Destitute of dignity or value; mean; base;

of hair.-2. A man bald pltitul.

ii. 23. What should the people do with these bald tri- Baldly (bald'li), adv. N

Shak.

elegantly; openly. 4. Having white on the face; as, the bald Bald-money, Bawd-n tret; bald-faced (which see) Bald (wald). [A. Sax. ball, bold.] A common

badmun-i), n. (A Cor

bona, very good.] A na prefix and cuffix to many proper names; 1. Baldwin, bold in battle; Ethelbald, bold

Meum athamanticum,

ous plant. Called also Baldachin (bal'da-kin) , tr. Same as Balda

Baldness (bald'nes), n

lity of being bald: (a) Baldachino, Baldaquin (bal-da-kē'nő,

tural covering on the baldakin), n (It. baldacchino, Sp. balda

hair. (6) Deficiency quiano , a rich silk cloth or canopy carried over

ment, as in writing; gance; want of ornar style.Baldness of a of versification.' T. I Baldpate (bald'pāt), 7 without hair. -2. A pe

Come hither, goodm Baldpate, Baldpate ed), a. Destitute of

You bald-pated, lyin Bald-pike (bald'pik), longing to the family Baldrick, Baldric (b ric, baldric, &c., O.F. M.H.G. balderich, 0. L. balteus, a belt. ornament resemblin (Q) A belt worn roun man cingulum or mi

A palmer's amice wra

With a wrought Span (b) The jewelled orn neck by both ladie sixteenth century. belt, woín pendent shoulder, diagonally waist or below it. e ment or to suspend: Some were magni garnished with bel The baldrick was partly as a military symbol, and its sty rank of the wearer Athwart his breast at That shined like

rare

Baliachizo, Church of S. Ambrose, Milan,

the honest, from Baldacco, the Italian form of
Bagdad, where the cloth was manufactured.]
A canopy or covering of various kinds, as
(6) & canopy borne over the host or sacra-
mental elements. (b) A covering of silk or

tull supported on four poles and upheld
over the pope or ceremonial occasions. (c)A
đa, chain kl, Se lock; g, go; j jou; t, Fr. to; ng

BALCONY

an. (bal'

terior Balanites (bal-a-ni'tēz), n. 1. A small genus one o of plants, nat. order Simarubea, containing power two species, which are small spiny trees

, at any found in desert places in Asia and Africa. tance The oval fruits are purgative; they contain cones a very hard nut, used in India for fireworks. nated

2. Another name for Balayus, a genus of
laced

cirripeds.
Balanitis (bal-a-ni'tis), n. [Gr. balanos

, an acorn, and term. itis, signifying inflamma. Aspe

tion.) A kind of gonorrhea. same Balanophoraceæ (bal-a-nof'or-a"se-e), n. pl. r-fish (Gr. balanos, an acord, and phero, to bear,

from the compact terminal heads or comes nife of the flowers.) A curious order of parasitic, n. A leafless, flowering plants, which, from their knife, simple structure, were thought to be allied

laid to the Fungi. There are about thirty known rests species grouped into ten genera. They are the

generally of a bright yellow or red colour. ut the Their small flowers, in most cases unisexual, ng the are aggregated into dense masses. The fruit is ef. is one-celled, with a single seed. One of taking the best-known species is the Cynomorium

the coccineum, or Fungus melitensis of drug. erbal. gists, which at one time enjoyed a great the reputation as a styptic

Balanus (bal'a-nus), n. (Gr. balanos, a gland act of Dar.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

erne.

reads,

sed to

shell consists of T that I of an

six plates, with The

an operculum of
four valves. Co-

lonies are to be placed

found on rocks

left dry at low a reef

water, on ships,

on timber, on reef is

Lobsters and band

other crustace #, and

ans, and on the of the

shells of conchi Group of

fers and other sheet, Balanus tintinnabulum, molluscs. They lances

differ from the of the

members of the genus Lepas (Barnacles) in ncerti, having a symmetrical shell and in being desin the

titute

of a flexible stalk. They pass through her of a larval stage of existence, at which period

they are not fixed, but more about by means mom' of swimming feet, and possess large stalked ercury eyes, both feet and eyes disappearing when ed to they attach themselres to their final place erate, of repose. Often called Acorn-shells. dam- Balas, Balass (halas, bal-as), n (Fr. balais,

It. balascio, Spolar, from Ar. balakhel, valve & kind of ruby named from Badakhshan, 8 les so country of Central Asis (called Balasian by ů, by Marco Polo) ] A rariety of spinel ruby, of H. a pale ose red colour, sometimes inclining

to orange Its crystals are usually octaThat hedrons come to four-sided pyramids, applied tee to hee See SPINEL

The finest variety of gold doth Iris masctured at Vienna

BALD

207
projecting from the front of a building,
supported by columns, pillars, or consoles,

covering on four columns of marble and encompassed with a balustrade, railing,

or a canopy hanging from the roof
high altar in some churches. (a):
over a bed to which curtains are a
(e) A canopy or covering above the
kings,imperial personages, bishops a
ecclesiastical dignitaries. "The gran
baldaquino prepared to receive p
eniperors.' Thackeray.
The bed is like the baldaquin of St. Pe

THE
Sometimes spelled Baldequin, Bar.
Bald-buzzard (bąld'buz-zard), 1.
sometimes given in America to t
or fish-hawk (Pandion Haliaëtus).
PREY.
Bald-eagle (bald'é-gl), n. Same
Baldequin (bal'de-kin), n. Same

chino.
Balder (bal'der), n. [Icel. Baldr

baldor, à prince or hero.] In Scar Balcony.

the son of Odin, the young and or parapet. Balconies are common before

god of eloquence and just decision.

also Baldur.
windows.-2. The projecting gallery in the
interior of a building, as of a theatre. -

Balderdash (bal' dèr-dash), n. 3. The stern gallery in a large ship.

from Dan. balder, noise, clatter, a Bald (bald), a. (0.E. balled, ballid-a word

Dan. dask, a slap, a dash; comp. of very doubtful etymology. The old Eng.

W. baldordus, prattling, from lish forms have given rise to the supposition

prattle.] 1. Senseless prate; a that the word is a participle or adjective

words; ribaldry; noisy nonsense. from ball, rounded and smooth like a ball;

I heard him charge this publication wi more probably it is from the Celtic root seen

scurrility, billingsgate, and balderdash.

Hor in Armor, bai, a white mark on an animal's 2. A worthless mixture of froth face; ball, a name often given in England • To drink such balderdash or bonny to a horse that is bald-faced; Sc. beld or B. Jonson. belled, from bel or bell, a spot on a horse's Balderdasht (bąlder-dash), v.t. face; Ir. and Gael. bal, a spot.) 1. Destitute adulterate liquors. of hair, especially on the top and back of the head.

The wine-merchants of Nice brew and

and even mix it with pigeon's dung and Cæsar, because his head was bald, covered that defect with laurels.

Addison.

Bald-erne (bąld'érn), n. The whi 2. Destitute of the natural or usual covering

erne or sea-eagle of America (Hala of the head or top; as, a bald oak; a bald cocephalus), a species of aquatic mountain. 'Thy bald, awful head, O sovran feeds not only on fish but on la Blanc!' Coleridge.

geese, and various sea-fowl. TI No question asked him by any of the senators, but eagle which is emblazoned as the they stand bald before him.

Shak.

emblem on the standard of t 3. Destitute of beard or awn; as, bald wheat. States. 4. Destitute of appropriate ornament; un Bald-faced (bald'fast), a. Havin adorned; inelegant.

face or white on the face: said og (Milton) could stoop to a plain style, sometimes as, a bald-faced stag. even to a bald style.

Macaulay. Bald-head (bąld'hed), n. 1. A hea5. Destitute of dignity or value; mean; base; of hair.—2. A man bald on the h pitiful.

ii. 23. What should the people do with these bald tri. Baldly (bąla'li), adv. Nakedly; bunes?

Shak.

elegantly; openly. 6. Having white on the face; as, the bald Bald-money, Bawd-money (1 coot; bald-faced (which see).

bąd'mun-i), n. (A corruption Bald (bald). [A. Sax. bald, bold.] A common bona, very good.) A name for th prefix and suffix to many proper names; Meum athamanticum, a British as, Baldwin, bold in battle; Ethelbald, bold ous plant. Called also Spignel. noble, or nobly bold.

Baldness (bald'nes), n. The st: Baldachin (bal'da-kin), n. Same as Balda

lity of being bald: (a) want of 1 chino.

tural covering on the head or Baldachino, Baldaquin (bal-da-kē'no, hair. (6) Deficiency of approp bal'da-kin), n. [It.

baldacchino, Sp. balda ment, as in writing; meannes: quino, a rich silk cloth or canopy carried over gance; want of ornament; as,

style. Baldness of allusion and of versification.' T. Warton, Baldpate (bald'pāt), n.

1. A pa without hair. -2. A person with a

'Come hither, goodman bald pati Baldpate, Baldpated (bald'pā ed), a. Destitute of hair; shoj

'You bald-pated, lying rascal.' Bald-pike (bąld'pīk), n.

A gan longing to the family Amiidze. Baldrick, Baldric (bald'rik), n. ric, baldric, &c., 0. Fr. baudric, 1 M.H.G. balderich, O.H.G. balz, L. balteus, a belt. See BELT.] ornament resembling a belt; si (a) A belt worn round the waist man cingulum or military belt.

A palmer's amice wrapt him round,
With a wrought Spanish baldrick b

s (6) The jewelled ornament wori neck by both ladies and gentle sixteenth century. Dr. Morris. belt, woin pendent from the r shoulder, diagonally across the waist or below it, either simply

ment or to suspend a sword, dag! Baldachino, Church of S. Ambrose, Milan.

Some were magnificently dec

garnished with bells, precious the host, from Baldaccn, the Italian form of The baldrick was worn in fe Bagdad, where the cloth was manufactured.)

partly as a military and partly e A canopy or covering of various kinds, as

symbol, and its style served to (a) a canopy borne over the host or sacra

rank of the wearer. mental elements. (b) A covering of silk or

Athwart his breast a baldrick brave stuff supported on four poles and upheld That shined like twinkling stars wi over the pope on ceremonial occasions. (c) A precious rare.

the Balase * To last

Balastre (starts : the Chose Balaustine (Te-has to Go balaustion,

a wild-pomegraste tiower.) Pertaining to ide the wild - pomegranate tree. - Erisustine

flowers, the dried fowers of the pomegranate, used in medicine as astringents Balaustion (bs-last1-08), 2 (See BALAUSTINE.) A genus of plants, mat orier Myr. taceæ, containing one known species, & pulcherrimum, a shrub inhabiting south-western Australia, and said to be one of the most beautiful of plants, with numerous fowers resembling in shape and colour those of the dwarf pomegranate. Balay (ba-la), 7h Balas (which see) [The word is written in this way to represent the pronunciation of the French form, valais] Balbutiatet (bal-būʻshi-át), t.1 (L balbutio,

from balbus, stammering) To stammer in speaking Balbuties (bal-bū'ti-ez), 1. [Mod L, from

L. valbus, stammering. Stanimering. Also, a vicious and incomplete pronunciation, in which almost all the consonants are replaced by b and I. Dunglison. Balcon, Balcone * (balkón, bal-ko'nā), n. A balcony or gallery. Pepys. Balconet (balko-net), n. A low ornamental railing to a door or window, projecting but slightly beyond the threshold or sill Balconied (balko-nid), a. Having balconies

The house was double-dalconied. Egger North Balcony (balko-). 11. [Ite balcone, from balco, a scaffold, OH.G. Balcho, G. balkon, E balk, a beam.) 1. A stage or platform

ch, chain;

ch, Sc. loch;

8. go;

j, job; , Fr. ton;

ng, sing;

TH, ta

BALISTIDÆ

208

BALLAST

BALLAST

klesti (ballast), pp. Ballasted 'Who
ebole armadoes of carracks to be bal-

dlatego (ballast-aj), n. 1. An old right
(the almiralty in all the royal rivers of

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more or less elaborate, in w sons take part.–2. A com or theatrical representation, is told, and actions, chara

sions represented by gestur kian dlevying a rate for supplying ships by characteristic or illustrat rin hullast –2 The toll or duty paid for ing, scenery, decorations, tez hallast from a port or harbour. bearing in coats of arms, Last-engine (ba"last-en-jin)

, n. A steam cording to the colour, bezais

&c.
atge med for dredging a river or drawing
srch and ballast on a railway.

Ballet (bal-lå or bal'let), v.t.
hlast-getter (ballast-get-ér), n. One who dancing or in a ballet.
oplosed in procuring ballast for ships. He ballets to her: 'Will you c

dance?' 19 ue to the nature of the ballast labour

Tis is divisible into three classes: that per Ball-flower (bəl'flou-er), bised by the ballast getters, or those who are en

ornament resembling a rederasing it from the bed of the Tharnes; by seballar aşkters, or those who are engaged in

ball placed in a ciranggit from the getters to the ships requiring it;

cular flower, the three ally the ballast-heavers, or those who are engaged petals of which form a 1 pang on board of such ships. Mayhew.

cup round it. This orhllast-heaver (ballast-hēv-ér), 1. 1. One

down like the hammer of a gun on the trig- Balkisht (bak'ish), a. Furrowy; ridged; many of their literary as well as their dialectic pecu-
ger being pulled.
uneven. That craggy and balkish way.

liarities from the songs of the Scandinavian bards, Balistidæ (ba-lis' ti - dē), n. pl. (Balistes Holinshed.

whose popular ballads are generally of a higher rank

than those of the English or of any other of the (which see), and Gr. culos, resemblance. Balky (bæk'í), a. Apt to turn aside or to Northern nations. The Scottish resemble the Scan. The file-fishes,a family of brilliantly coloured stop abruptly; as, a balky horse. (American.) dinavian ballads both in form and in diction, and tropical fishes, of the order Plectognathi, Ball (bal), n. [From Fr. balle, which is from

some Northern words and forms occur in them, of characterized by a conical compressed body, 0.H.G. balla, palla, G. bal, Icel. böllr, ball;

which it would not be easy to produce examples in
other branches of literature.

G. P. Marsh.
jaws armed with one or two rows of distinct hence also It. balla, Sp. bala, a ball. Bale, a
teeth, the upper jaw being immovably united package, is another form, and balloon, ballot

2. In music, a short air, repeated to two or with the skull, and by the skin being covered are derivatives.) 1. A round body; a sphe

more stanzas, simple in construction, and with scaly plates surmounted by spines and rical substance, whether natural or artificial; having an accompaniment of a strictly subtubercles. They feed on molluscs and polyps, or, a body nearly round; as, a ball for play;

ordinate character. especially upon the young of the madre a ball of thread; a ball of snow. -2. Any part Balladt (bal'lad), v.i. To make or sing balpores, and frequent coral-reefs, the asperi of a thing, especially of the human body,

lads. ties of which their armed skin enables them that is rounded or protuberant, as the ball These envious libellers ballad against them. Donne. to resist. The Monacanthus (Aleuteres) of the eye; the ball of the thumb; the ball

To celebrate in a Monoceros, or unicorn file-fish, can distend

Balladt (ballad), v. t. of a dumb-bell; the ball of a pendulum, that its abdomen at pleasure. It grows to the is, the weight at the bottom.-3. The globe

ballad. Rhymers ballad us out o' tune.'

Shak.
length of more than 2 feet. One species, or earth, from its figure. (Now rare.]
Balistes capriscus, is found in the Mediter-

Ballader, Balladist (bal'lad-er, ballad-ist),
Julius and Anthony, those lords of all,

A writer or singer of ballads. ranean. T'heir tiesh is unwholesome or

Such cocks are often enployed to regulate Ballium (balli-um),

the water in the cistern by its buoyancy, There were commo inkt, skatting off the water in the one Ballon (bå-lon), . Billed, o. Bald; deprived of hair. Chaucer. Balloon (bal-lön'), n.

; th, 8c. loch; 8.go; i. job; , Fr. ton; ng,

namentis usually found is employed in putting ballast on board

inserted in a hollow kipa See extract under BALLAST-GETTER.

moulding, and is gen14 dredging machine for raising ballast

erally characteristic of bas tiver-bedd ; a ballast-lighter.

the decorated style of hallasting (ballast-ing) , n. 1. The act of

the fourteenth century. fizishing with ballast, as a ship or railway. Ball-gudgeon (balguj-on ! Pallast; that which is used for ballast, as gudgeon,

permitting a lat Dured or broken stones, cinders, or other

the arbor or shaft, whil material , used for the covering of roads or

itself in the socket. E. E is kere the upper works or permanent way Balliage, Bailage (balli-a

bailiage, the jurisdiction kallast-lighter (ballast-lit-ér), 2. 1. One

BAILIFF.) A small duty too is employed in conveying ballast for

the city of London by als chipa Saz extract under BALLAST-GETTER.

denizens, for certain com

by them. el carrying ballast, or for removing sand, Balliards † (bal' yärdz), for other depositions from the beds of

Spenser. meets and the bottom of harbours, docks, Ballimongt (bal'li-mon

Holland. ballatt (tallat), r. (A form of ballad, fol. Balling-gun (bal'ing-gun

ment for administering into balls to horses. It from which the air is pa the ball being held on th by the pressure of air an by a piston when fairly phagus. E. H. Knight. trip or caper.) A form

da railway.

son.

A large flat-foored barge for heaving up

A per.

Low at her feet present the conquered ball. Balladize (bal'lad-iz), v.t. To convert into poisonous.

Granville.

the form of a ballad; as, to balladize a story. Balistraria (bal-is-tra'ri-a), n. [L., from ba

Ye gods, what justice rules the ball!

Freedom and arts together fall. lista, a cross-bow.] In old fort. (a) a cruci

Pope.

(Rare.) form aperture in the walls of a fortress,

Ballad-maker (ballad-māk-ér), n. A writer A globe representing the earth is a common of ballad Shak. through which crossbowmen discharged symbol of sovereignty; hence Bacon has the Ballad-monger (bal'lad-mung-ger), n. А their arrows. (6) The room wherein the

phrase to hold the ball of a kingdom in the balisters or cross-bows were deposited. (c)

dealer in ballads; an inferior poet; a poetsense of to bear sovereignty over it. - 4. A aster. A turret in which an archer was stationed

game played with a ball. ---5. In farriery, a projecting from the parapet or from the

I had rather be a kitten and cry mew, form of medicine, corresponding to the term face of the building. These turrets are com

Than one of these same metre ballad-mongers. bolus in pharmacy. It is generally in the

Shak. mon in the border counties of England and form of a cylinder 2 or 3 inches in length.- Ballad-opera (bal'lad-op'e-ra), n. An Scotland, and are commonly called barti 6. In metal. a loop (which see).-7. Milit. opera in which only ballads are sung. Johnzan8.

the projectile of a firearm; a bullet; such Balize (ba-lēz'), n. [Fr. balise, Sp. valíza, a

projectiles having formerly been always Balladry (bal'lad-ri), n. Compositions of beacon; L. palus, a stake.) A sea-mark; a spherical. In this sense the word is also

the ballad kind; the style of ballads. 'Base pole raised on a bank.

used collectively; as, to supply a regiment balludry is so beloved. Drayton. Balk (bąk), n. [A. Sax. balca, a balk or with powder and ball.-8. In printing, a Ballad-singer (bal'lad-sing-ér), n. ridge between furrows, a beam, a roof, a cushion consisting of hair or wool, covered son whose employment is to sing ballads in covering; Sc. bauk, a ridge left in plough with leather or skin, and fastened to a stock, the streets. ing, or serving as a boundary, a beam in a called a ball-stock, formerly used to put ink Ballahou (bal'a-hö), n. A fast-sailing tworoof; Icel. bálker, a balk, a partition; bjálki, on the types in the forms.-9. In pyrotech masted vessel, rigged with high fore-andSw. Dan. bjelke, G. balken, a beam. From nics, a composition of combustible ingre aft sails, much used in the West Indies. the senses of a dividing ridge or a beam dients, which serve to burn, smoke, or give The foremast rakes forward, the mainmast there is no very violent transition to that of

light. --Ball-and-socket, an instrument made aft. a check or frustration.) 1. A ridge of land of brass, with a universal screw, to move Ballam (bal'lam), n. A canoe hollowed out left unploughed in the body of a field, or horizontally, obliquely, or vertically, used of timber, in which Ceylonese pearl-fishers between fields; an uncultivated strip of land in managing surveying and astronomical wash out the pearls from the oysters. serving as a boundary, often between pieces instruments. -- Ball-and-socket joint, a joint Ballant (ballant), n. A ballad. [Scotch.) of ground held by different tenants. (Com formed by a ball or rounded end of anymon in provincial English and Scotch.) thing playing within a socket, so as to ad

They're dying to rhyme ower prayers, and ballants, and charms.

Sir W. Scott. Dikeres and delveres digged up the balkes.

mit of motion in all directions. This kind

Piers Plowman. of joint is much employed for gasaliers, and Ballan-wrasse (Hallan-ras), n. [Lit. spotted2. Anything left untouched, like a ridge is exemplified in the hip-joint of man.

wrasse; Ir. bal, ball, a spot, Gael. ballach, in ploughing. (Rare.}

Ball (bal), n. (Armor. bal, a white mark on spotted.) An acanthopterygian fish, Labrus The mad steele about doth fiercely fly, an animal's face. See BALD.] A common

bergylta or maculatus, family Labridæ, taken Not sparing wight, fe leaving any balke. Spenser. name for a cart-horse in England.

all along the British coasts. Its flesh is not 3. A beam or piece of timber of considerable Ball (bal), n. (Corn. bal, Ir. boll, a hole, a

much esteemed. The young are known as length and thickness; specifically,(a) a cross mine.) A tin mine.

the streaked wrasse. beam in the roof of a house which unites and Ball (bal), n. [Fr. bal, It. ballo, Sp. bayle, Ballarag (bal’la-rag), v.t. [A form of bullysupports the rafters; a tie-beam. Tubbes a dance; It. and L L ballare, to dance, to rag (which see).] To bully; to threaten. hanging in the balkes.' Chaucer. [Provin shake, from Gr. ballizó, to dance. Ballad, (Vulgar.) cial English and Scotch.) ) Milit. one of ballet are from this stem.) A social assem You vainly thought to ballarag us. 7. Warton. the beams connecting the successive sup bly of persons of both sexes for the purpose Ballas, t Ballacet (hal'las), v.t. To ballast. ports of a trestle-bridge or bateau-bridge. of dancing, either at the invitation and

Webster. See BALLAST, PP. (c) In carp. a squared timber long or short; expense of an individual, or at the cost of a large timber in a frame, floor, or the like; those attending it, in which case the ball

Ballast (bal'last), n. (D. ballast, Dan. a square log.-4. A frustration; a check; a is said to be public.

ballast, baglast, ballast; lit. a back loaddisappointment. A balk to the confidence Ball (bal), v.t. To make into a ball; specif

bag, back, after, and last, load, cargo-either of the bold undertaker.' South. [Written cally, (a) in the manufacture of cotton, to

as a load in the after part of the ship, where also Baulk. 1 wind into balls. (6) In metal. to heat in a

ballast was stowed, or as a back or return

load after a cargo had been carried away Balk (bąk), v.t. (See above.] 1. To leave furnace so as to form balls for rolling untouched in ploughing. Gower. Hence Baling machine, a machine for balling cot

and discharged. Or, according to another 2. To leave untouched generally; to omit; ton thread. - Balling furnace, a furnace for

etymology proposed, bal=E. bale, and balto pass over; to neglect; to shun. balling piles or faggots of iron. - Balling

last is therefore literally a load useless or

of no value (in itself).) i. Heavy matter, as Nor doth he any creature balk.

tool, a tool for this purpose. But lays on all he meets. Drayton. Ball (bal), v.i. To form or gather into a ball,

stone, sand, or iron, laid on the bottom of a Sick he is, ... and balks his meat. Rp. Hall, as snow on horses' hoofs, or mud on the feet.

ship or other vessel, to sink it in the water By reason of the contagion in London, we balked We can say either that a horse balls, or that

to such a depth as to enable it to carry suffi. the inns. Evelyn. the snow balls.-- Balling iron, in farriery, a

cient sail without oversetting. A ship is

said to be in ballast when she sails without 3. To disappoint; to frustrate. hook for clearing horses' feet from balls of

a cargo, having on board, besides ballast, Charles was not to be balked in his generous pur

snow, &c. pose. Prescolt

only the stores and other articles requisite Ballad (bal'lad), 1. [Fr. ballade, a ballad,

for the use of the vessel and of the passen4. + To heap up so as to form a balk or ridge. Pr. ballada, from L.L. (and It.) ballare, to (Rare. ) dance.

gers on board.-2. The sand placed in bags

See Ball, a dance, also BALLAT, Ten thousand bold Scots, three and twenty knights, BALLET.) 1. A short narrative poem, espe.

in the car of a balloon to steady it, and Balk'd in their own blood, did Sir Walter see cially such as is adapted for singing; a poem

to enable the aëronaut to lighten the balOn Holmedon's plains.

Shack.
partaking of the nature both of the epic and

loon by throwing part of it out. - 3. The [Some editors read bak'd in this passage.) the lyric. As applied to the minstrelsy of

material used to níl up the space between Balk (bąk), v.i. 1. To turn aside or stop in the borders of England and Scotland, of

the rails on a railway in order to make it one's course; as, the horse balked; he balked Scandinavia and Spain, a sort of minor epic

firm and solid.-4. F'iy, that which confers in his speech. Sponser. [Obsolete in this

steadiness. reciting in verse, more or less rude, the excountry, but still used in America. )--2.1 To ploits of warriors, the adventures of lovers,

These men have not ballast enough of humility deal at cross purposes; to talk beside one's and the mysteries of fairyland, designed to

and fear.

Hammond. meaning

be rehearsed in musical recitative accom- Ballast (ballast), v.t. 1. To place ballast Her list in stryfful terms with his to balk, Spenser,

panied by the harp: Roundel, balades, and in or on; as, to ballast a ship; to ballast a Balker (bæk'ér), n. One who balks.

virelay. Gower.

balloon; to ballast the bed of a railway. See Balker (bak'ėr), ». A fisherinan's name for

A ballad, properly speaking, is a simple narrative

the noun.-- 2. Fig. to confer steadiness on: one who stands on rocks and eminences

of one or more events ... set to a tune sufficiently to keep steady. "Tis charity must ballast to espy the shoals of herring, and to give rhythmical to act as one of the original purposes of the heart' Hammond - 3. Fig. to coun. notice to the men in boats which way they a ballad, namely, a dance tune. The old ballad

terbalance by anything solid whatever has pass

tunes still existing are nearly all of this character.

Stainer & Barrett,

a tendency to intiate or render unsteady. Balkingly (bak'ing-li), adv. In a manner The Scottish ballads are in general superior to the Now you have given me virtue for my guide, to balk or frustrate. Clarke.

English, and it is highly probable that they derive And with true honour ballasted my pride. Dryden, Fåte, får, fat, fall; mē, met, hér; pine, pin; note, not, move; tübe, tub, bull; oil, pound; ü, 8c. abune; y. sc. fey.

ta board ship

Wasteartridge

wong the lt spelling ballata.) A ballad.
hallatt (tallat), v.t. To sing or celebrate
Da ballad.

I make but repetition
viza is ordinary and Ryalto talk,
kad bailates, and would be play'd o' the stage.

Webster.
Ballatoon (bal-la-tön), n. A heavy luggage Ballismus (bal-lis'mus),
brat employed in Russia in the transport of
taber
, especially from Astrakhan to Mos-

with fits of leaping or ru

Ballista, Balista (bal-1 kanatryi (ballat-ri), n. (Form equivalent to talla dry, from ballat, old form of ballnd.)

pl. Ballistæ, Balista bort et ballads; ballad-singing. Milton.

(L., from Gr. ballo, to Ball-calibre (balkal-i-bér), 9. A ring-gauge

of the two great mili lar determining the diameter of gun-shot

by the ancients for dis

especially against a be Ball-cartridge (balkär-trij), n. A cartridge

often confounded with diataining a ball , in contradistinction to

for throwing darts, whil

stones. In principle it r Ball-caster (balkast-êr), n. A caster for fur

æval arbalist or cross-b uitare, having a ball instead of a roller.

stronger, ballistæ beir Bay-cock (balkok), n. A kind of self-act

threw stones of 3 cwts. ng sup-cock opened and shut by means of

by machinery, as by le shollow sphere or ball of metal attached to

cord was of hair. Afte Cæsar the term appears in a loose way to an

throwing missiles. — 2. Fig. 2.

galus, a bone of the tar Ballister (bal'lis-ter),

ter. Ballistic (bal-lis'tik), a See BALLISTA.] Perta or to the art of shootiv

by means of an engin FR

lum, an apparatus in Robins for ascertaining tary projectiles, and ca of fired gunpowder. fired against a cast-iro of sand, which forms ti and the percussion ca vibrate. The arc thro is measured on a coj carrying a vernier, an tion forms a measure of the ball. The ball nearly superseded by apparatus. See ELEO

VETTE. Ballistics (bal-lis’tik

art of discharging la of the ballista or oth

Fie 1, Cistern with Ball.cock attached.

Fig. 2, laternal structure of Cock.
Vare shown open so as to admit water, b, Arm
of the lever, which being raised shuts the valve.
the end of a lever connected with the cock.

the sapply of water to cisternis. The ball floats

mi rees and sinks as the water rises and

anc, arch. a court wi

outer and inner.

Ballet Taller)

the .

The One who makes up sew-
bug thread into balls for domestic use.
Pallet (bal-lk or ballet), n. [Fr, ballet, It.
billettes See Ball, a dance.] 1. A dance,

Balloon, 2.

ball, a foot-ball, aug. ballon, a foot-ball, al a ball; Sp. balon, a i See BALL] 1.1 A

[blocks in formation]

209

&c.

many of their literary as well as their dialectic pecti. liarities from the songs of the Scandinavian Darts, whose popular ballads are generally of a higher tank than those of the English or of any other of the Northern nations. The Scottish resemble the Scan. dinavian ballads both in formi and in diction, and some Northern words and forms occur in them, of which it would not be easy to produce examples in other branches of literature. G. P. Marsh. 2. In music, a short air, repeated to two or more stanzas, simple in construction, and having an accompaniment of a strictly subordinate character. Ballad + (bal'lad), v.i. To make or sing ballads.

These envious libellers ballad against them. Derne. Balladt (bal'lad), v.t. To celebrate in a ballad. “Rhymers ballad us out o' tune.' Shak. Ballader, Balladist (bal'lad-ér, bal'lad-ist),

7. A writer or singer of ballads. Balladize (bal'lad-iz), v.t. To convert into the form of a ballad; as, to balladize a story.

{Rare.] Ballad-maker (ballad-mák-er), 11. A writer

of ballads. Shak. Ballad-monger (bal'lad-mung-gėr), th A

dealer in ballads; an inferior poet; a poetaster.

I had rather be a kitten and cry meg,
Than one of these same metre ballad-mongers.

Skak.
Ballad-opera (bal'lad-op'e-ra), 1. An
opera in which only ballads are sung. John-
con.
Balladry (bal'lad-ri), n. Compositions of

the ballad kind; the style of ballads. Base
balludry is so beloved.' Drayton.
Ballad-singer (bal'lad-sing-ér), ". A per-
son whose employment is to sing ballads in
the streets.
Ballahou (bal'a-hö), 1. A fast-sailing two-
masted vessel, rigged with high fore-and-
aft sails, much used in the West Indies
The foremast rakes forward, the mainmast
aft.
Ballam (bal'lam), n. A canoe hollowed out
of timber, in which Ceylonese pearl-Bishers
wash out the pearls from the oysters.
Ballant (bal'lant), 11. A ballad. [Scotch)

They're dying to rhyme ower prayers, and tallents,
and charms

Sir W. Scott
Ballan-wrasse(bal'lan-ras), 1. [Lit spotter-

wrasse; Ir. bal, ball, a spot, Gael ballack,
spotted.] An acanthopterygian fish, Labrus
bergylta or maculatus, family Labride, taken
all along the British coasts. Its flesh is not
much esteemed. The young are known as
the streaked wrasse.

Ballastt (ballast), pp. Ballasted.

· Who

more or less elaborate, in whic sent whole armadoes of carracks to be bal sons take part.-2. A comple last.' Shak,

or theatrical representation, in Ballastage (bal'last-āj), n. 1. An old right is told, and actions, charact of the admiralty in all the royal rivers of sions represented by gesture, Britain of levying a rate for supplying ships by characteristic or illustrativ with ballast. -2. The toll or duty paid for ing, scenery, decorations, &c. taking ballast from a port or harbour. bearing in coats of arms, dei Ballast-engine (bal'last-en-jin), n. A steam cording to the colour, bezants engine used for dredging a river or drawing earth and ballast on a railway.

Ballet (bal-lā or ballet), v.t. Ballast-getter (bal'last-get-ér), n. One who dancing or in a ballet. is employed in procuring ballast for ships. He ballets to her: 'Will you com I now come to the nature of the ballast labour

dance?' itself. This is divisible into three classes: that per Ball-flower (bəl'flou-ėr), n. formed by the ballast-getters, or those who are en ornament resembling a gaged in raising it from the bed of the Thares; by the ballast-lighters, or those who are engaged in

ball placed in a circarrying it from the getters to the ships requiring it;

cular flower, the three and by the ballast-heavers, or those who are engaged petals of which form a in putting it on board of such ships. Mayhew. cup round it. This orBallast-heaver (ballast-hēv-er), n. 1. One

namentis usually found

inserted in a hollow who is employed in putting ballast on board ships. See extract under BALLAST-GETTER.

moulding, and is gen2. A dredging machine for raising ballast

erally characteristic of from a river-bed; a ballast-lighter.

the decorated style of 1 Ballasting (bal'last-ing), n. 1. The act of

the fourteenth century. furnishing with ballast, as a ship or railway. Ball-gudgeon (bəl'guj.on), n 2. Ballast; that which is used for ballast, as gudgeon, permitting a laters gravel or broken stones, cinders, or other

the arbor or shaft, while s material, used for the covering of roads or

itself in the socket. E. H. 1 to form the upper works or permanent way Balliage, Ballage (balli-āj, of a railway

bailiage, the jurisdiction of Ballast-lighter (bal'last-līt-er), n. 1. One

BAILIFF.) A small duty for who is employed in conveying ballast for

the city of London by alien: ships. See extract under BALLAST-GETTER.

denizens, for certain commod 2. A large flat-floored barge for heaving up

by them. and carrying ballast, or for removing sand, Balliards (bal' yardz), n. silt, or other depositions from the beds of

Spenser, rivers and the bottoms of harbours, docks, Ballimongt (bal'li-mong), &c.

Holland. Ballatt (ballat), n. (A form of ballad, fol- Balling-gun (balling-gun), lowing the It. spelling ballata.) A ballad.

ment for administering m

into balls to horses. It con Ballatt (bal'lat), v.t. To sing or celebrate in & ballad.

from which the air is parti: I make but repetition

the ball being held on the e Of what is ordinary and Ryalto talk,

by the pressure of air and 1And ballated, and would be play'd o' the stage. by a piston when fairly w

Webster. Ballatoon (bal-la-tön'), n. A heavy luggage Ballismus (bal-lis'mus), n.

phagus. E. H. Knight. boat employed in Russia in the transport of timber, especially from Astrakhan to Mos

trip or caper.] A form of

with fits of leaping or runni COW

Ballista, Balista (bal-lis'ta Ballatryt (bal'lat-ri), n. [Form equivalent

pl. Ballistæ, Balistæ (balto balladry, from ballat, old form of ballad.]

(L., from Gr. ballő, to th Stock of ballads; ballad-singing Milton. of the two great military Ball-calibre (balkal-i-ber), n. A ring-gauge

by the ancients for discha for determining the diameter of gun-shot on board ship.

especially against a besieg

often confounded with the Ball-cartridge (balskär-trij), n. A cartridge

for throwing darts, while the containing a ball, in contradistinction to

stones. In principle it reser blank-cartridge.

æval arbalist or cross-bow, Ball-caster (bal’kast-ér), n. A caster for fur

stronger, ballistæ being niture, having a ball instead of a roller.

threw stones of 3 cwts. Th Ball-cock (bai'kok), n. A kind of self-act

by machinery, as by lever ing stop-cock opened and shut by means of

cord was of hair. After the a hollow sphere or ball of metal attached to

Cæsar the term appears to ha in a loose way to any la

throwing missiles. — 2. In Fig. 2.

galus, a bone of the tarsus. Ballister (bal'lis-tér), n.

ter. Ballistic (bal-lis'tik), a. [F See BALLISTA.] Pertaining or to the art of shooting st by means of an engine.

lum, an apparatus invente Fig. 1.

Robins for ascertaining the tary projectiles, and conseq of fired gunpowder. A piec fired against a cast-iron case of sand, which forms the bal and the percussion causes t vibrate. The arc through v is measured on a copper carrying a vernier, and the a tion forms a measure of the

of the ball. The ballistic r Fig. 1, Cistern with Ball-cock attached.

nearly superseded by Navez Fig. 2, Internal structure of Cock.

apparatus. See ELECTRO-BA a, Valve shown open so as to admit water. b, Arm

VETTE. of the Jever, which being raised shuts the valve. Ballistics (bal-lis'tiks), n.

art of discharging large mi the end of a lever connected with the cock. of the ballista or other eng Such cocks are often employed to regulate Ballium (bal'li-um), n. [S the supply of water to cisterns. The ball floats anc. arch. a court within a on the water in the cistern by its buoyancy, There were commonly tv and rises and sinks as the water rises and outer and inner. sinks, shutting off the water in the one Ballon (bå-lon), n. (Fr.) ] case and letting it on in the other.

Balloon, 2. Balled, t a. Bald; deprived of hair. Chaucer. Balloon (bal-lön'), n. (O.F Baller (bąl'er), n. One who makes up sew ball, a foot-ball, aug. of bale ing thread into balls for domestic use. ballon, a foot-ball, a balloon Ballet (bal-là or bal'let), n. [Fr. ballet, It. a ball; Sp. balon, a foot-ba balletto. See BALL, a dance.] 1. A dance, See BALL.) 1.1 A large b:

[graphic]

Ballarag (balla-rag), v.t. [A form of bully

rag (which see)] To bully; to threaten.
[Vulgar.)

You vainly thought to ballarag us. 7. Warton.
Ballas, Ballacet (bal'las)

, v.t. To piliast.
Webster. See BALLAST, PP.
Ballast (bal'last), n (D. ballast, Dan.
ballast, baglast, ballast; fit. a back load-
bag, back, after, and last, load, cargo-either
as a load in the after part of the ship, where
ballast was stowed, or as a back or return
Toad after a cargo had been carried away
and discharged. Or, according to another
etymology proposed, bal=E. bale, and bal-
Fast is therefore literally a load useless or
of no value in itself)] i Heavy matter, as
stone, sand, or iron, laid on the bottom of a
hip or other vessel, to sink it in the water
o such a depth as to enable it to carry sufi-
cient sail without oversetting. A ship is
aid to be in ballast when she sails without

cargo, having on board, besides ballast,
nly the stores and other articles requisite
or the use of the vessel and of the passen-
ers on board. The sand placed in bags

the car of balloon to steady it, and enable the aéronaut to lighten the balon by throwing part of it out. - 3. The aterial used to fill up the space between

[graphic]

ne rails on a railway in order to make it
m and solid.-4. Fig, that which coulers
eadiness.
These men have not ballast enough of humility
d fear.

Hammond.
Hlast (ballast), v.t. 1. To place ballast
or on; as, to ballast & ship; to ballast a
lloon; to ballast the bed of a railway. See
2 noun. -2Fig. to confer steadiness op;
keep steady 'Tis charity must ballast
heart.' Hammond --3. Pig

. to coun.
balance by anything solid whiatever bas
endency to inflate or render unsteady.
w you have

given me virtue for my guide,
d with true bonour valia sted my pride. Dryern.
pound; Ü, Sc. abune: \,80. fey.

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Bam (am), 1. Perhaps an abbreviation of

deceiver.) A cheat; an imposition. (Slangil panicles from the

Bam (barn), 1.6 To bamboozle; to cheat; quins. The small

, Fr. ton;

BALLOT

210

BALSAMINE

BALSAMITO han and some other species of the genus over by angels, and fo

in several churches. Impatiens (which see)

bino in the church of
Balsamito (bal-sa-mé'to), na A liquid hav-
mens bitter taste, a light sherry colour, and richly decorated figus
the olour of the tonguin-bean, produced by believed to have a
ligesting the fruit of the balsam of Peru
a run it is taken internally, and used as
s application to sloughing sores, especially
those caused by the chigoe.
Balsamodendron (bal'sam-o-den" dron), n.
Gr. bilermon, balsam, and dendron, a tree.]
A fenus of trees, nat, order Amyridacex,
markable for their powerful balsamic
jie They have compound leaves and
mal green flowers followed by small oval
sute B. Myrrha yields myrrh or hobali,
called kerobeta by the Abyssinians; B. Opo-
kalemun yields the balm of Mecca, beshan,
er balessan of Bruce; B. gileadense yields
balm of Gilead; B. africanum yields the
African bdellium; B. Mukul of Scinde yields
a resin called googul, believed to be the
bellium of the Bible.
Balsamous (bal' sam-uts), a. Having the
qualities of balsam; abounding in balsam;
wasisting of balsam.

Norite radical poisture is not the tallow or fat of
zamaks, bot an oily and balsamous substance.

Sterne,
Bulteus (bal'tė-us), n. pl. Baltei (bal'te-i).
L1 1. Lo Rom, antiq. the belt by which the
Ford or quiver was suspended.--2. In arch.
a band in the Aank of an Ionic pulvinated

The Bambino, Church
Baltic (baltik), 4. {New L. balticus, from

curing diseases. Ва" Lith. baltas, white.) Pertaining to the sea

though inferior descrskich separates Norway and Sweden from

the adoration of the fa Denmară , Germany, and Russia; situated Bambocciade, Bamb

in Catholic countries. få or bordering the Baltic Sea; as, the ad, bam-bok'se-át), n.

simpleton, cripple, tE

capital

on account of his defc

ticket or paper, or the like, by which one Shak. - 3. Anything which heals, soothes, flated seal-skiris, connected by a sort of votes, and containing no indication of who or mitigates pain. 'Sleep the balm of platform on which the fisherman, passenthe voter is. —3. The system of voting in hurt minds.' Shak. 4. The name of several gers, or goods are placed.-2. A sailing canoe such a way that the voters cannot be iden. plants, particularly of the genus Melissa,

of Ceylon. tified; the act of voting by balls or tickets. nat. order Labiatæ. The balm-mint or gar* The insufficiency of the ballot.' Dickens. den balm is M. officinalis. (See MELISSA.) Vote by ballot is the mode adopted in this The species are aromatic and used as corro. country in the election of members of Par borants.--Balm of Gilead, the exudation of a liament, members of school-boards, and of tree, Balsamodendron gileadense, nat. order municipal corporations, the ballot having Amyridaceæ, a native of Arabia Felix, and been introduced by an act passed in 1872. In also, it is said, from the closely allied species such statutory elections the mode of voting is Balsamodendron Opobalsamum. The leaves by voting papers, and not by balls. In clubs, of the former tree yield when bruised a scientific societies,insurance offices,commer strong aromatic scent; and the balm of cial associations, &c., the members, mana Gilead of the shops, or balsam of Mecca or gers, or directors are almost universally of Syria, is obtained from it by making an elected by ballot, and for this purpose col incision in its trunk. It has a yellowish or oured balls are usually employed; hence the greenish colour, a warm bitterish aromatic expression to black-ball, signifying to reject taste, and an acidulous fragrant smell. It a candidate.-4. The whole amount of votes is valued as an odoriferous unguent and given; as, there was a large ballot. cosmetic by the Turks, who possess the

Fisherman with his Balsa, Pacific Coast. Ballot (ballot), v. i. (Fr. ballotter. See the country of its growth. It is frequently noun.) To vote or decide by ballot: fre adulterated for market.-- Balm of Gilead quently with for; as, he was proposed as a fir, which produces a turpentine called

Balsam (bal'sam), n. [Gr. balsamon, L. balmember of the club, and balloted for ac Canada balsam, is the Abies balsamifera. It

samum, a fragrant gum, said to be from cordingly. See the noun. rises to the height of 30 feet, and its range is

Heb. baal, prince, and shaman, oil.) 1. An

oily, aromatic, resinous substance, flowing The judges would never take their balls to from Virginia to Canada. - Bastard balm is

spontaneously or by incision from certain ballot against him.

North,
& plant of the genus Melittis.
1. To anoint as with balm

plants. A great variety of substances pass
Balm (bäm), v.t.
Ballot (bal'lot), v.t. To vote regarding by

under this name. But in chemistry the term ballot; to vote for or against by ballot; to or with anything fragrant or medicinal.

is confined to such vegetable juices as are choose or elect by ballot.

Balm his foul head in warm distilled waters. Shak. liquid or spontaneously become concrete,

Shrouded in cloth of state; balmd and entreasured and consist of resins mixed with gums or None of the competitors arriving at a sufficient with full bags of spices !

Shak, volatile oils, the resins being produced from number of balls, they fell to ballot some others. Sir H. Wotton. 2. To soothe; to mitigate; to assuage; to

the oils by oxidation. A valsam is thus inBallota (bal-lo'ta), 17. [Gr. ballotě, a plant heal.

termediate between a volatile oil and a resin. believed to be black horehound.) A genus

Oppressed nature siceps:

It is soluble in alcohol and ether, and capof hairy or woolly plants, nat. order Labiatæ.

This rest might yet have balm'd thy broken senses. able of yielding benzoic acid. The balsans

Shak. One species, B. nigra (the black or stinking | Balm-cricket (bám krik-et), n.

are either liquid or solid: of the former are

The fieldhorehound), has been used in pectoral com

the balm of Gilead, and the balsams of plaints and in cattle diseases. cricket (Gryllus campestris).

copaiba, Peru, and Tolu; of the latter, benBallotant (bal'lot-ant), n. A voter by ballot.

The balm-cricket carols clear

zoin, dragon's blood, and storax.- Balsam

In the green that folds thy grave, Tennyson, Jas. Harrington. (Rare.)

of Mecca, balm of Gilead. See BALM. -Ballotation t (bal-lot-a'shon), n. A voting Balmer (bäm'ér), n. One who or that which

Balsam of Peru, the produce of Myrosper. by ballot. (Rare.] balms or anoints.

mum peruiferum. The last two balsams, in

addition to their medicinal uses, are emThe election of the Duke of Venice is one of the Blood must be my body's only balmer,

ployed in perfumery, in the manufacture of most intricate and curious forins in the world, con No other balm will there be given. Raleigh. sisting of ten several ballotations. Sir H. Wotton.

pastiles, and of chocolate. -Balsam of Tolu, Balmify (bäm'i-fi), v. t. (E. balm, and L. fa the produce of Myrospermum toluiferum, Ballot-box (bal'lot-boks), n. A box for recere, to make.) To render balmy.

nat. order Leguminosa, the tolu-tree of ceiving ballots.

South America. It is of a reddish yellow Balloter (ballot-ér), n. One who ballots or

The Auids have been entirely sweetened and balmified.

Dr. G. Cheyne.

colour, transparent, thick, and tenacious, votes by ballot.

but growing hard and brittle by age. It is Ballotin (ballot-in), n. The carrier of the Balmily (bäm'i-li), adv. In a balmy man. very fragrant, and, like the balsam of Peru, ballot-box; the taker of the votes by ballot.

is a stimulant, and used as a pectoral. Jas. Harrington. (Rare.]

Balm-mint (bäm'mint), n. See under Balsam or Canada balsam of the microscopBallotist (bal'lot-ist), n. An advocate for BALM.

ist, the liquid resin of Abies balsamifera, voting by ballot.

Balmoral (bal-mo'ral), n. or a. {After the employed for preserving dry transparent Ballottade, Ballotade (hal-lo-täd), . (Fr.) royal residence on Deeside, Aberdeenshire.) objects when mounted for the microscope, A leap of a horse, as between two pillars or A term applied to various articles, especially 2. The Impatiens balsamina, a beautiful upon a straight line, so that when his fore of dress; as, balmoral boots; balmoral hon ornament of our gardens and greenhouses. feet are in the air he shows nothing but the net; balmoral petticoat: often used as a See IMPATIENS. – Balsam apple (Momordica shoes of his hind-feet without jerking out. noun; as, to wear balmorals.

Balsamina), an annual Indian plant. A In a capriole the horse jerks out his hind- Balmy (bäm'i), a. 1. Having the qualities of water and a subtile oil are obtained from it, legs.

balm; aromatic; fragrant. Balmy breath.' which are used as deobstruents.- Balsam Bajow (ballo), n. (Probably of same origin Shak. Her balmy bosom.' Tennyson. tree, a name given to several balsan -proas E. bole, the trunk of a tree.) A pole; a 2. Producing balm. The balmy tree. Pope. ducing trees, as Clusia, Copaifera (which cudgel. [Old and northern English.] 3. Soft; soothing; assuaging; refreshing: produces the balsam of copaiba), and Pis

Tired nature's sweet restorer, balmy sleep.' Keep out, or Ise try whether your costard or

tacia, the turpentine-tree or mastich-tree, my ballot be the harder. Shak, Young.

and, specifically, to the Abies balsamifera, Ball-proof (bal'prof), a, Capable of resist

Now with the drops of this most balmy time

the tree which produces Canada balsam. My love looks fresh.

Shak. Balsam (bąl'sam), v.t. To apply balsam or ing balls from firearms; impenetrable by

balm to; to render balsamic. balls from firearms,

Balnealt (bal' nē-al), a. (L. balneum, a Ball-screw (bąl'skrö), n. A screw intended bath.) Pertaining to a bath. * Balneal heat.'

The gifts of our young and Aourishing age are very

sweet when they are balsamed with discretion. to be fastened to the end of the ramrod of a Howell.

BA. Hacket, gun, and to be used in extracting bullets Balnearyt (bal'ne-a-ri), n. (L. balnearium, Balsamation (hml-sam-a'shon), n. The act from the barrel of the gun.

from balneum, a bath.) A bathing room. of rendering balsamic. Ball-stock (bal'stok), n. In printing, a "The balnearies and bathing-places." Sir 7. Balsamic (bal-sam'ik), a. Having the quastock somewhat hollow at one end, to which Browne.

lities of balsam; stimulating: unctuous; the ball is attached, and which serves as a Balneation t (bal-ne-a'shon), n. {From L.L. soft; mitigating; mild. Balsamic cups, to handle. See BALL, 8.

balneare, to bathe. See BALNEARY.] The wheezing lungs medicinal.' Philips. Bal-train (b] trăn), T. A set of rolls act of bathing. 'Balneations, washings, and Balsamic (bal-sam'ik), 1... A warm, stimufor rolling puddlers balls or loops into fomentations. Sir T. Browne.

lating, demulcent medicine, of a smooth bars.

Balneatory (bal'nė-a-to-ri), a. (L. balnea and oily consistence. Ball-trolly, (bąl'trol-li), n. A small iron torius.] Belonging to a bath or bath-keeper. Balsamicalt (bøl-sam'ik-al), a. Same as truck used in conveying the balls of puddled | Balneum (bal'né-um), fl. (L., a bath.) In Balsamic, The balsamical humour of my iron from the puddling-furnace to the tilt chem. a vessel filled with water or sand, in blood.' Sir M. Hale. hammer or squeezer. E H. Knight.

which another vessel is placed to be heated; Balsamically (bal-sam'ik-al-li), adv. In a Ball-valve (bal'valv), n. A valve consist a bath.

See BATH, 4,

balsamic manner.
ing of a ball placed in a circular cup which | Balonea (ba-lo' né-a), n. A name for an Balsamiferous (bal-sam-if'er-us), a. (Bal.
has a hole in its bottom. By means of a oak, Quercus Ægilops, large quantities of sam, and L. fero, to bear.) Producing balm
curtain of wire placed over it the ball is the cups of which are imported from the or balsam: applied to those trees and shrubs
restrained from moving beyond a certain south of Europe into England for tanners' which yield balm.
point, either upward or to the side.

use,
See VALONIA.

Balsaminaceæ, Balsamineæ (bal' sam-1-
Ball-bein (bại văn), n. A variety of iron Gre, Balotade (bal'o-täd), ». Same as Ballottade. ná"sē-ė, bal-sam-in'e-ė), 7). pl. A small group

found in loose masses of a circular form, Balsa (bäl’sä), f. [Sp. balsa, Fr. balse, from of plants formerly separated from the Gercontaining shining particles, probably of balza, the native name of a kind of light aniaceae because of their irregular flowers, iron pyrites.

porous wood used in Peru for constructing but again restored to that order, as the disBalm (båm), n. [O. Fr. baulme, Fr. baume, rafts.] 1. A kind of raft or float used on the covery of additional species of Impatiens,

a contraction of balsam (which see).} 1. A coasts and rivers of Peru and other parts of the only genus in the group, shows these
name common to odoriferous or aromatic South America for fishing, for landing goods differences not to be of sufficient import-
exudations from trees or shrubs. -2. Any and passengers through a heavy surf, and ance to establish an order,
fragrant or valuable ointment. • The balm forother purposes where buoyancy is chiefly Balsamine, Balsamina (balsam-in, bal.
washed off wherewith thou wast anointed.' wanted. It is formed generally of two in sam-i'na), n. A name given to the garden

[graphic]

ner.

Baltic islands; the Baltic coasts.
Baltimore-bird (bal'ti-mor-bérd), n. An Pieter Van Laar, & p
American birl, the literus Baltimorii, family
keteride, nearly allied to the Sturnidæ, or a term applied to go
Marfings, about the size of an English lin common life, as per
at its head is black and its body of a games, and merry-ma
bright gold colour. It is the Oriolus Balti-

great master of this Bate of Wilson.

art Wilkie is probab Baluster (halus-tér), n. (Fr. balustre, Sp: tive. Called also Bar balaustre

, It balaustro, a baluster, It. and Bamboo (bam-bö), . Sp. balaustra, the flower of the wild ponie

common name of the armate, all from L balaustium, Gr. balaus belonging to the ge sim, the flower of the wild pomegranate, the see). baluster being so called from a resemblance Bamboo (bam-bö), v.t of form, or from pomegranate flowers being with a bamboo; to ba Esed to adorn balustrades. ) 1. A small Bamboo-rat (bam-bő column or pilaster, of various forms and rodent animal of the dimensions, often adorned with mouldings, in Malacca, of the siz used for balustrades. 'Leaning .. on those Bamboozle (bam-bö balustert Tennyson. (In this use often corrupted into banister or bannister.)

seems closely allied

bazed (or simply ? The lateral part of the volute of the Ionic founded, a word that

the bung of a barrel, Balustered (bal'us-térd), a. Having balusters Balustered with gold' Dryden.

to confound, the oi

perhaps to stupefy v Balustrade (bal-us-trăd”), 16. [Fr. balus ments of the word i trade

, from balustre, a baluster (which bouse, D. buizen, to det). A row of balusters, joined by a rail, To impose or practi

hoax; to humbug; t

All the people upone three worthy gentlemen bubbled, abused, bamb Bamboozler (bambamboozles; a chea upon another.

There are a set of se bamboozlers, that play Bambusa (bam-bö' genus of grasses co

species, natives of serving as a lence or inclosure for altars, which attain a gre

is B. arundinace underground rhize and jointed, sprir stalks, which at ground send out shoots which are u stalks are armed two sharp rigid leaves, 8 or 9 in short footstalks.

Balustrade.

balconies, staircases, terraces, tops of build-
late
, fe: it is often used merely as an OT-

Broad-based flights of marble stairs

Ran up with golden balustrade. Tennyson.
Balzarine (balza-rèn), n. A light mixed
fabric of cotton and wool for ladies' dresses.
bamboozle; compare also Armor, bamsin, to
eachant, to deceive, bamour, a sorcerer, a

It was all a bam, madam, a scene we thought pro-
fer to act

A. Murphy.
To relieve the tedium be kept plying them with all
Det of bamus.

Prof. Wilson

sticks, flutes,

many purposes This is vitae conspiracy, I suppose, to bam, to

and other easter Foote.

almost wholly 1 Bambino (häm-bënó), 10. (It., a child.] In

boxes, baskets, the fine arts, the figure of our Saviour repre

&c. It grows fc bented as an infant in swaddling clothes,

before it produc Ater surrounded by a halo, and watched

as rice,

stems grow to 501 are so hard and building and for water pipes, and

wheelle. (Slang.)

boste ut of my money.

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