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balsam and some other species of the genus over by angels, and forming the Impatiens (which see).

in several churches. The Santi Balsamito (bal-sa-mē'to), n. A liquid hav. bino in the church of Ara Coeli ing a bitter taste, a light sherry colour, and richly decorated figure carved the odour of the tonquin-bean, produced by believed to have a miraculou digesting the fruit of the balsam of Peru in rum. It is taken internally, and used as an application to sloughing sores, especially those caused by the chigoe. Balsamodendron (bal'sam-o-den"dron), n. (Gr. balsamon, balsam, and dendron, a tree.) A genus of trees, nat. order Amyridacere, remarkable for their powerful balsamic juice. They have compound leaves and small green flowers followed by small oval nuts. B. Myrrha yields myrrh or hobali, called kerobeta by the Abyssinians; B. Opobalsamum yields the balm of Mecca, beshan, or balessan of Bruce; B. gileadense yields balm of Gilead; B. africanum yields the African bdellium; B. Mukul of Scinde yields a resin called googul, believed to be the bdellium of the Bible. Balsamous (bal'sam-us), Q. Having the qualities of balsam; abounding in balsam; consisting of balsam.

Now the radical moisture is not the tallow or fat of animals, but an oily and balsamous substance.

Sterne. Balteus (hal'tê-us), n. pl. Baltei (baltē-1). (L.) 1. In Rom. antiq. the belt by which the sword or quiver was suspended. -2. In arch. The Bambino, Church of Ara Coc a band in the flank of an Ionic pulvinated capital.

curing diseases.

Bambinos Baltic (bal’tik), a. (New L. balticus, from though inferior description ar Lith. baltas, white.) Pertaining to the sea the adoration of the faithful in which separates Norway and Sweden from in Catholic countries. Denmark, Germany, and Russia ; situated Bambocciade, Bambocciate on or bordering the Baltic Sea; as, the ād, bam-bok'se-át), n. (From It Baltic islands; the Baltic coasts.

simpleton, cripple, the nicknas Baltimore-bird (bąl'ti-mor-bérd), n. An Pieter Van Laar, a painter of American bird, the Icterus Baltimorii,family on account of his deformity.) Icteridæ, nearly allied to the Sturnidæ, or a term applied to grotesque starlings, about the size of an English lin common life, as penny wed net. Its head is black and its body of a games, and merry-makings. T bright gold colour. It is the Oriolus Balti great master of this style, an more of Wilson.

art Wilkie is probably its best Baluster (bal'us-tér), n. (Fr. balustre, Sp. tive. Called also Bambocciata. balaustre, It. balaustro, a baluster, It. and Bamboo (bam-bö), n. (Malay Sp. balaustra, the flower of the wild pone common name of the arbores granate, all from L. balaustium, Gr. balaus belonging to the genus Bam tion, the flower of the wild pomegranate, the see). baluster being so called from a resemblance Bamboo (bam-bö), v.t. To pur of form, or from pomegranate flowers being with a bamboo; to bastinado. used to adora balustrades.] 1. A small Bamboo-rat (bam-bö'rat), n. column or pilaster, of various forms and rodent animal of the genus Rhi: dimensions, often adorned with mouldings, in Malacca, of the size of a rab used for balustrades. 'Leaning.. on those Bamboozle (bam-boʻzl), v.t. balusters.' Tennyson. [In this use often seems closely allied to Sc. bur corrupted into banister or bannister. ) - bazed (or simply bazed), sti 2. The lateral part of the volute of the Ionic founded, a word that reminds capital.

the bung of a barrel, and baaz Balustered (bal'us-térd), a. Having balus to confound, the original me

ters. Balustered with gold.' Dryden. perhaps to stupefy with drink. Balustrade (bal-us-trād'), 1. [Fr. balus ments of the word may be bar trade, from balustre, a baluster (which bouse, D. buizen, to swill or see).] A row of balusters, joined by a rail, To impose or practise upon; t

hoax; to humbug; to deceive.

All the people upon earth, excepti three worthy gentlemen, are imposed bubbled, abused, bamboozled. Bamboozler (bam-bö'zl-ér), 1 bamboozles; a cheat; one wh upon another.

There are a set of fellows they ca bamboozlers, that play such tricks. Bambusa (bam-bo'sa), n. (See

genus of grasses containing n Balustrade.

species, natives of tropical reg serving as a fence or inclosure for altars,

which attain a great size. Th

is B. arundinacea. From balconies, staircases, terraces, tops of buildings, &c.: it is often used merely as an or

underground rhizome, which nament.

and jointed, spring several r Broad-based flights of marble stairs

stalks, which at 10 or 12 f Ran up with golden balustrade. Tennyson. ground send out from their Balzarine (bal'za-rēn), n.

shoots which are united at the

A light mixed fabric of cotton and wool for ladies' dresses.

stalks are armed at their join Bam (bam), n. (Perhaps an abbreviation of

two sharp rigid spines. The bamboozle; compare also Armor. bamsin, to

leaves, 8 or 9 inches long, a

short footstalks. The flowers enchant, to deceive, bamour, a sorcerer, a deceiver.) A cheat; an imposition. [Slang.]

panicles from the joints of the

stems grow to 5 or 6 inches in It was all a bam, madam, a scene we thought pro are so hard and durable as t per to act.

A. Murphy

building and for all sorts of To relieve the tedium he kept plying them with all manner of bams.

Prof. Wilson.

water pipes, and for poles to :

quins. The smaller stalks are Bam (bam), v.t. To bamboozle; to cheat; to wheedle. (Slang.)

ing-sticks, flutes, &c. The pl:

many purposes in the East This is some conspiracy, I suppose, to bam, to chouse me out of my money.

and other eastern countries. Foote.

almost wholly made of it; Bambino (bäm-bē'no), n. (It., a child.] In boxes, baskets, mats, paper, n the fine arts, the figure of our Saviour repre &c. It grows for twenty-five sented as an infant in swaddling clothes, before it produces seed, which often surrounded by a halo, and watched used as rice, while the you

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BALSAMINE

Alated seal-skirs, connected by a sort of
platform on which the fisherman, passen-
gers, or goods are placed.—2. A sailing canoe
of Ceylon.

Fisherman with his Balsa, Pacific Coast.

Balsam (bal'sam), n. [Gr. balsamon, L. bol.
samum, a fragrant gum, said to be from
Heb. baal, prince, and shaman, oil.] 1. All
oily, aromatic, resinous substance, flowing
spontaneously or by incision from certain
plants. A great variety of substances pass
under this name. But in chemistry the term
is confined to such vegetable juices as are
liquid or spontaneously become concrete,
and consist of resins mixed with gums or
volatile oils

, the resins being produced from
the oils by oxidation. A balsam is thus in.
termediate between a volatile oil and a resin.
It is soluble in alcohol and ether, and cap-
able of yielding benzoic acid. The balsams
are either liquid or solid: of the former are
the balm of Gilead, and the balsams of
copaiba, Peru, and Tolu; of the latter, ben-
zoin, dragon's blood, and storax.- Balsam
of Mecca, balm of Gilead. See BALM.-
Balsam of Peru, the produce of Myrosper
mum peruiferum. The last two balsams, in
addition to their medicinal uses, are em-
ployed in perfumery, in the manufacture of
pastiles, and of chocolate. Balsam of Tolu,
the produce of Myrospermum toluiferum,
flat. order Leguminose, the tolu-tree of
South America. It is of a reddish yellow
colour, transparent, thick, and tenacious,
but growing hard and brittle by age. It is
very fragrant, and, like the balsam of Peru,
is a stimulant, and used as a pectoral

. –
Balsam or Canada balsam of the microscop-
ist, the liquid resin of Abies balsamijera,
employed for preserving dry transparent
objects when mounted for the microscope.

2. The Impatiens balsamina, a beautiful
ornament of our gardens and greenhouses
See IMPATIENS. -Balsam apple

(utomordica
Balsamina), an annual Indian plant. A
water and a subtile oil are obtained from it,
which are used as deobstruents.- Balsam
tree, a name given to several balsam-pro-
ducing trees, as Clusia, Copaifera (which
produces the balsam of copaiba)

, and Pistacia, the turpentine-tree or mastich-tree, and, specifically, to the Abies balsamifera, the tree which produces Canada balsam. Balsam (bal'sam), v.t. To apply balsam or balm to; to render balsamic.

The gifts of our young and flourishing age are very
sweet when they are balsamed with discretion.

By. Hacket
Balsamation (bul-sam-ñ'shon), n. The act

of rendering balsamic.
Balsamic (bal-sam'ík), a. Having the qua-
lities of balsam; stimulating; unctuous;
soft; mitigating; mild. "Balsamic cups, to

wheezing lungs medicinal.' Philips.
Balsamic (bal-sam’ik)

, 1. A warm, stimu-
lating, demulcent medicine, of a smooth
and oily consistence.

Same as
Balsamicalf

(bal-sam 'ik-al), a.
Balsamic. The balsamical humour of my
blood.' Sir M. Hale.
Balsamically (bal-sam'ik-al-li), ado. In a

balsamic manner.
Balsamiferous (bal-sam-if'er-us), a. [Bal-
sam, and L. fero, to bear.) Producing halm
or balsam: applied to those trees and shrubs

which yield balm, Balsaminaceæ, Balsamineæ (balsam-j. "se-ė, bal-sam-in'ő-e), n. pl. A small group of plants formerly separated from the Ger aniacea because of their irregular flowers, but again restored to that order, as the discovery of additional species of Impatiens, the only genus in the group, shows these differences not to be of sufficient importance to establish an order. alsamine, Balsamina (balsam-in, bp/sam-i'na), n. A name given to the garden oil, pound; ü, Sc. abune; J. Bc. fey.

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BANDILEER

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jundileer (van-di-lēm), n. See BANDOLERR. Bandy (ban'di), n. (Fr. b Juoding-plane (band'ing-plån), 11. A plane bander, to bend, from G

1. A club bent at the end and for cutting out grooves, and inlaying smags and bands in straight and circular at play. -2. A game played nekIt bears a general resemblance to Called also Bandy-ball. the plane called a plough.

Bandy (ban'di), v.t. pret. landing-ring (band'ing-ring), 1. A ring ppr. bandying. [See noun jazed orer the body of a hat while on the and fro, as a ball in pla hack so as to make its edge impinge upon bandied and struck upon the break of the band and form the brim at from without' Cudwort! nght angles to the crown. 4. Knight contentiously; to give an Bandit (ban'dit), n. pl Bandits, Banditti cally: generally intended sa'dita

, ban-dit'ti). [It. bandito, pp. of that each party is trying
baudire, to proclaim, to banish or proscribe of the other, either in po
by proclamation. See BAN.) An outlaw; other way; as, to bandy
dbo in a general sense a robber; a highway: | bandy hasty words.' Sham
was; a lawless or desperate fellow. Hun-

Do you bandy looks with me
Ay baditti.' Sir W. Scott.
Bandittot (han-dit'to),2. (Sing of banditti.

3. To agitate; to toss at

to man. be BANDIT. Outlawed; lawless; desper

Let not known truth be bas A Roman smorder and banditto slave

Shak.

Bandy (ban'di), v.i. To

whether in emulation or Bandittot (ban-dit'to), n. A bandit. Web

fit to bandy with thy las Bandle (ban’dl), n. (Ir. bannlamh, a cubit

Bandy (ban'di), a. (Fr. -Szan, a measure, and lamh, the hand.]

BANDY, a club.] 1. Ben An Irish measure of 2 feet in length,

a bend or crook outward Bandlet , Bandelet (bandlet, band'e-let), n.

legs; as, his legs are q Fr. bandelette, dim. of bande.) 1. In arch.

bandy leg, or crooke my little band or flat moulding, as that

2. Limp; without suffic of bad cloth.

Murdered sweet Tully.

country vehicle much

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Ban (ban), v.t. (See the noun.) 1. To curse; in the West Indies and the warmer parts of joining fractured and dislocated bones, and to execrate, He cursed and banned the America. It is very fond of the ripe fruit the like.—2. A band or ligature in general; Christians.' Knolles. -- 2. To prohibit; to of the banana and sour-sop.

that which is bound over something else. interdict. Lord Lytton.

Banco (bang'ko), n. [It., a bank, a bench, a Zeal too had a place among the rest, with a bandBan (ban), v,i. To curse. 'And cursed, and counter; L.L. bancus. See Bank.] 1. In age over her eyes.

Addison band and blasphemies forth threw.' Spenser. com. a term employed to designate the 3. In arch. one of the iron rings or chains Ban (ban), n. [Sp., from banana(which see). ] money in which the banks of some countries bound round the springing of a dome, the A fine sort of muslin made from the fibres keep or kept their accounts, in contradis

circumference of a tower, or some similar of banana leaf-stalks, and imported from the tinction to the current money of the place. part of a building, to tie it together. East Indies.

The distinction was more necessary when Bandage (band'aj), v. t. pret. &pp.bandaged; Ban (ban), 7. [Serv, ban, Slav. pam, a lord.] the currency consisted, as it often did, of ppr, bandaging. To bind up or dress, as a Anciently, a title given to the military clipped, worn, and foreign coins.--2. In law,

wound, a fractured limb, &c., with a roller chiefs who guarded the eastern marches of a seat or bench of justice.-Sittings in banco, or bandage; to cover with a bandage, as for Hungary, but in 1849 limited to the governor the meeting of four of the judges of a com the purpose of blinding; as, to bandage the of Croatia, Slavonia, and Dalmatia, who is mon law court at Westminster in term.

eyes. appointed by the Emperor of Austria, and Band (band), n. [A. Sax. bend, a band, Bandagist (band'āj - ist), n. A maker of is on the same footing as the other governors from bindan, to bind; D. Icel. Sw. and G.

bandages, especially for hernia. of Austrian crown-lands.

band, a band, bond, ligature, &c., from root Bandala (ban-däʻlä), n. {Native pame.) The Banal (ban-al), a. [Fr., from ban, proclama of vind (which see). In the sense of body

strong outer fibre of the abaca or Musa textion, the term being originally applied to of men, the word is the Fr. bande, from G.

tilis of Manilla, made into cordage, especially things (as a mill) used by people of the bande, which comes probably from the same into the well-known Manilla white rope. lower classes in common, in accordance Teutonic root, but may be from root ban. Bandana, Bandanna (ban-dan'a), n. [Indian with the proclamation of a feudal superior.) See BIND.) 1. That which binds together, name.] 1. A peculiar kind of silk handkerHackneyed; trite; stale; commonplace, literally or figuratively; a bond or means chief manufactured by the Hindus, but now

When the volume was returned, it was with the of attachment in general. I drew them commonly given to silk and cotton hand-
commendation. It is a most beautiful book.' I was with cords of a man, with bands of love.' kerchiefs manufactured in this country,
so pleased with the words in the first place because Hos. xi. 4.
they were different from the usual banal expression

which have a uniformly dyed ground, usu

Land of my sires! what mortal hand of satisfaction. G. Saintsbury.

ally of bright red or blue, ornamented with

Can ere untie the filial band
Banana (ba-nä'na), n. (Sp., from the na That knits me to thy rugged strand? Sir W. Scott.

white or yellow circular, lozenge-shaped, or tive name.) A plant of the genus Musa, Often used with such specific senses as: (a) a

other simple figures produced by discharg.

ing the colour.–2. A style of calico-printing nat. order Musaceæ, M. sapientum, while narrow strip or ribbon-shaped ligature, tie,

in imitation of bandana handkerchiefs,
or connection; a fillet; a cincture. A sin-
gle band of gold about her hair.' Tennyson.

bright spots being produced on a red or
() A fetter; a chain. 'Release me from my Bandbox (band boks), n. A slight box made

dark ground by discharging the colour. bands.' Shak.

of pasteboard, or thin flexible pieces of light And Pharaoh-Nechoh put him in bands at Riblah.

2 Ki. xxiii. 33

wood and paper, for holding bands, caps,
(c) In bookbinding, one of the cords at the bonnets, or other light articles of attire,

A tool used
back of a book to which the thread is at Band-driver (band'driv-ér), n.
tached in sewing.-2. That which binds or in correcting irregularities in the bands of
strengthens; as, (a) a border or strip on an

machinery. E. H. Knight.
article of dress; as, a neck-band; a wrist-

Bandeau (ban'do), n. pl. Bandeaux (ban'. band. 'Band and gusset and seam.' Hood.

do). (Fr., dim. from bande, a band.) A fillet (6) Naut. a strip of canvas sewed across a

worn round the head; a head-band; espesail to strengthen it. —3. That which resem

cially, a ribbon with an ornamental knot bles a band, tie, or ligature, in position or

worn by girls and women above the fore

head.
form; specifically, (a) in arch. (1) any flat
low member or moulding, broad but not Around the edge of this cap was a stiff bandeau of

leather.

Sir W. Scott.
deep; called also Fascia, Face, or Plinth;
more specifically, the round moulding, or Banded (band'ed), a. An epithet applied to
suit of mouldings, which encircles the mid any object which is striated or crossed by
dle of the shaft in the early English style.

coloured bands. - Banded column, one hay-
(2) The tablet or string-course round a tower ing cinctures at intervals.
Banana (Musa sapientum).
or other part of a building. (b) In bot, a Bandelet, n. See BANDLET.

A kind of toy the plantain is M. paradisiaca. It is an

space between the ribs or lines of umbelli- Bandelore (ban'de-lör), n.

ferous fruits. (c) The linen ornament about very much used at the beginning of the herbaceous plant with an underground

present century. the neck of a clergyman, and with the ends

Also called Bandelone stem. The apparent stem, which is some

and Bandeloir. hanging down in front, a relic of the amice:

See QUIZ. times as high as 30 feet, is formed of the closely compacted sheaths of the leaves, in this sense commonly in the plural. 'Little Bandert (band'er), n. One that bands or as

sociates with others. The leaves are 6 feet long and I foot broad,

plain bands which they liked not because

the Jesuits wore such.' Jer. Taylor. (d) A Yorke and his banders proudly pressed in with a strong midrib, from which the veins

belt, cord, or chain for transmitting power To challenge the crown by title of right, are given off at right angles; they are used for thatch, basket-making, &c., besides

with less noise and friction than attend the yielding a flax from which some of the use of toothed gearing: such bands gener: Banderole (ban'de-rol), n. (Fr. banderole,

from Sp. banderola, a finest muslins of India are prepared. The ally pass over two pulleys or drums, com

little banner, dim. from spikes of the flowers grow nearly 4 feet long, municating motion from one to the other,

which crowns the Doric architrave. — 2. A Bandy (ban'di), n. [Ta
small tand for encircling anything; as, an
main-rubber bandlet.

extract.
Band-master (band'mas-tér)
, 17. The leader

The framework of bandic: a director of a band of music.

but of wood as strong as pos Bandog (han dog), n. [Band and dog, lít. a sernicircular awning

of ba brand-dog; D. band-hond, a chained dog. I

of cloth or canvas. The

vehicle, and as a rule poss A large, fierce kind of dog, in England gen kind. The conveyance is erally a mastiff, usually kept chained. Resoleund, tied in a leam or band, from which he Bandy-jig (ban'di-jig The keeper catered leading his bandog, a large Bandy-ball (ban'di-bal

Sir W. Scott

dance practised by th Landoleer (ban-dó-ler'), 1. (Sp. bando

performed with the tolopa , Pr

. bandoulière, a large shoulder in. Mayhew. belt , from 8p, ban

Bandy-legged (ban'a bandy or crooked legs. Bandyman (ban'di-m gaged in driving a ban

When also, as all over speak of bandymen and anglicized is simply the old Bane (ban), n. [A, Sa death, bane; Icel, bani, Sw. bane, death; 0.H. Goth. banja, a blow; murder, phenein, to s] tion. The cup of c tempered to their ban of a deadly quality; 1 of mischief, injury, 01 is the bane of society.

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M

d, sach] A large
leathern belt or bald-
nek, to which were at
tached a bag for balls
and a funber of pipes
in cases of wood or
metal covered with
leather, each contain-
imga charge of gun-
powder, worn by an
ricat musketeers. The
bandoleer was thrown
erer the left shoulder
and hang under the
richt arma, the ball bag
occupying the lower
must extremity, while
the pipes were sus-
pended on either side.
The name is sometimes
given to the small cases
themselves, 10x super-
wenkel by cartridges.
Written also Bandi-

Band-pulley (band'pol-1), T. A flat-faced Bang (bang), v. t. [I

, Fr. ton; ng,

bandera, a banner. See in bunches, covered with purple-coloured 4. A company of persons united together by

BANNER.) 1. In her. a bracts. The fruit is 4 or 5 inches long, and some common bond, as by community of in

streamer affixed by small 1 inch or more in diameter; it grows in terests, especially a body of armed men; a

lines or strings immedilarge bunches, weighing often from 40 to

company of soldiers. We few, we happy
few, we band of brothers.' Shak.

ately under the crook op 80 lbs. The pulp is soft and of a luscious

the top of the staff of a taste; when ripe it is eaten raw or fried in

My lord of Somerset, unite
Your troops of horsemen with his bands of foot.

bishop, and folding over slices. The banana is cultivated in tropical

Skak.

the staff. - 2. A little and sub-tropical countries, and is an impor 5.7 That which binds one legally; a bond or Banderole. flag or streamer affixed tant article of food. Weight for weight it obligation

to & mast, a military is inferior in nutriment to the potato, but Tell me, was he arrested on a band !

weapon, or a trumpet; a pennon; a banit is more productive than any other plant Not on a band, but on a stronger thing. Shak. drol. grown for food, and a much greater number

Band (band), v.t. 1. To bind or tie with a From the extremity ... Auttered a small bande of persons can be subsisted in a given space band, * His eyes were banded over.' Dry

Sir W. Scott.

role or streamer bearing a cross. of ground with the banana than in an equal den. --2. To mark with a band.-3. To unite

3. In Gothic arch. a form of spiral mouldspace of Europe with wheat. in a troop, company, or confederacy.

ing. Called also Bandrol, Bannerol. Banana-bird (ba-nä’na-bérd), n. Icterus

Among the sons of morn what multitudes

Band-fish (band' fish), n. Ribbon-fish or
Were banded to oppose his high decree. Milton.

snake-fish. One of the popular names of a
Specifically - 4. In her. to bind or mark

genus (Cepola) of acanthopterygious fishes, with a band of a different colour from the

very thin and flat in proportion to their charge,

length. They belong to the family Cepolido Band (band), v.i. To unite; to associate; to

(which see).
confederate for some common purpose.

Bandicoot (ban'di-köt), n. [A corruption
With them great Ashur also bands,

of the Telinga name pandikoku, lit. pig-rat.]
And doth confirm the knot.

Millon.

1. The Mus giganteus, the largest known

species of rat, attaining the weight of 2 or 3
Bandt (band), v.t. (From ban, with para-
sitic d, or It. bandire, to banish, from ban

lbs., and the length, including the tail, or

24 to 30 inches. (which see).) To interdict; to banish.

It is a native of India, and

is very abundant in Ceylon. Its flesh is said Sweet love such lewdness bands from his fair com to be delicate and to resemble young pork, pany.

Spenser.

and is a favourite article of diet with the Band (band), pret. of bind. [Old English and coolies. It is destructive to rice fields and Scotch.)

gardens.--2. A member of the family Per. Apd with a belt his gown about him band, Spenser.

amelidæ, which bear & resemblance to the Banana-bird (Icterus leucopteryx).

Bandage (band'áj), n. [Fr. bandage, from true bandicoot. See PERAMELIDÆ.

bande, a band. See BAND.) 1. A fet, Bandikai (ban'di-kā), n. One of the names leucopteryz, a pretty insessorial bird which roller, or swathe used in dressing and bind of the Abelmoschus esculentus. See ABELfrequents the fruit-trees around the houses ing up wounds, restraining hemorrhages, MOSCHUS.

My bane and antidot 3. A disease in sheep, the Rot-SYN. Pest, jury. Banet (ban), t.t. To stroy

realis,

Bandoleer.

For minors have not on Bandoline (bar'dő-lên), 9. A mucilaginois

pertunad substance, variously prepared Bane (bán), n. Bone from Iceland or Irish moss, strained quince Bane - berry (ban' b seeds

, and gum tragacanth, and used in the wilet to impart a glossy sleekness and a cer

because of their nau lain stifiness to the hair; a kind of stick

See ACTEA.

Baneful (băn'ful), Bandoline (ban'dő-lên), 0.t. To render

cious; poisonous. glossy by the use of bandoline. andoline (ban dô-lăn), vi To apply ban- Banefully (in ful

biline to the hair. Dickens. Bọn (ban don), n (0. 5. and Pr, bar- Banefulness bán1

manner; pernicions drm See ABANDON.) Disposal; jurisdiction;

of being baneful;

ousness. Randore (ban'dőr)

, n. (Fr.; It. pandora, Bane-wort (ban'we from L vindura, and this from Gr. pan. darura, a intusical instrument of three strings,

to two plants: (a) A escribed to Pan.) A musical stringed in.

also Deadly Nighi flammult, from its

bane to sleep. whcel tored on a shalt and driven by a band; Comp. Icel. bang,

club, the clapper of 1. To beat, as wi thump; to cudgel.

He having got som into his servants hang another. 2. To beat or han to treat with viole

This desperate tem palley

3. To bring a lou slamming a door

name of plants of th

man.

Baneful he

wiwer.

trument like a lüte. Pepys.

band-wheel.
Sandrol (band'ről), 2. Same as Banderole.
Bandsaw (band'są), n. A saw consisting of
steel fielt with a serrated edge revolving

theek
Bandsman (bandz'man), n. A musician
who plays in a band
bandstring hand'string), m. A string or

asked at one time woru 23 x pendant to &
Vanilor neckcloth. Jer. Taylor.
Band-wheel (vand'whël), n. Same as Band-

Fåte, far, fat, fall;

, met, her;

pine, pin;

note, not, move,

tube, tub, bull;

oil, pound;

u, Sc. abune;

$, Sc. tely.

BANDIKAI

BANDILEER

213

ts of joining fractured and dislocated bones, and Iruit

the like.-2. A band or ligature in general; that which is bound over something else.

Zeal too had a place among the rest, with a band. In age over her eyes.

Addison. the

3. In arch. one of the iron rings or chains tries bound round the springing of a dome, the adis

circumference of a tower, or some similar lace.

part of a building, to tie it together, when Bandage (band'áj), v.t. pret. &pp.bandaged; d, of

ppr. bandaging. To bind up or dress, as a lau, wound, a fractured limb, &c., with a roller Inco, or bandage; to cover with a bandage, as for com the purpose of blinding; as, to vandage the

eyes. and, Bandagist (band'āj -ist), 1. A maker of dG

bandages, especially for hernia. root Bandala (ban-da’lä), 11. (Native name.) The body strong outer fibre of the abaca or Mulsa tezm G tilisof Manilla, made into cordage, especially game into the well-known Manilla white rope. ban.

Bandana, Bandanna (ban-dan'a), n. (Indian ther,

name.) 1. A peculiar kind of silk handker. Jeans chief manufactured by the Hindus, but now them

commonly given to silk and cotton handkerchiefs manufactured in this country, which have a uniformly dyed ground, usually of bright red or blue, ornamented with

white or yellow circular, lozenge-shaped, or Scott.

other simple figures produced by dischary(a) a ing the colour.–2. A style of calico-printing

in imitation of bandana handkerchiefs, 1 sin.

love.'

mmy

Riblah. 1.33.

מן מ

2, tie,

bright spots being produced on a red or
yson.

dark ground by discharging the colour.
Bandbox (vandboks), 11. A slight box made
of pasteboard, or thin fiexible pieces of light

wood and paper, for holding bands, caps,
t the

bonnets, or other light articles of attire. is at Band-driver (band'driv-ér)

, n. A tool used ds or

in correcting irregularities in the bands of

machinery. E. Ħ. E'night.
wrist-

Bandeau (ban'do), n. pł. Bandeaux (ban'-
Food.

do) (Fr., dim from bande, a band.) A fillet
CSS 3

worn round the head; a head-band; espe

cially, a ribbon with an ornamental krot
esem
on or

worn by girls and women above the fore

head.
7 iat
t not

Around the edge of this cap was a stiff candeau of

leather
Finth;

Sir IV. Sant
L, or Banded (band'ed), a. An epithet applied to
mid any object which is striated or crossed by
style

coloured bands. --Banded column, one har-
ower

ing cinctures at intervals.
30t. a Bandelet, 1. See BANDLET.
Delli- Bandelore (ban'de-lör), n. A kind of tog
bout very much used at the beginning of the
ends present century. Also called Bandelone
vice:

and Bandeloir. See Quiz.
Little Bandert (band'ér), n. One that bands or 23-
a use

sociates with others.

Yorke and his banders proudly pressed in

To challenge the crown by title of right. wer

Mir. for Mags. the

Banderole (ban'de-rol), 12. [Fr. banderole, ner

from Sp. banderola, a
com-

little banner, dim. from
her
r by
fin-
0:2

Bandileer (ban-di-lēr'), n. See BANDOLEER. Bandy (ban'di), n. [Fr. bande, Banding-plane (band'ing-plān), n. A plane bander, to bend, from G. ban used for cutting out grooves, and inlaying 1. A club bent at the end for sti strings and bands in straight and circular at play.--2. A game played with work. It bears a general resemblance to Called also Bandy-ball. the plane called a plough.

Bandy (ban'di), v.t. pret. & po Banding-ring (band'ing-ring), n. A ring

ppr. bandying. [See noun.] 1. passed over the body of a hat while on the and fro, as a ball in play. block so as to make its edge impinge upon bandied and struck upon us.. the break of the band and form the brim at from without. Cudworth.-2. right angles to the crown. E. H. Knight contentiously; to give and rece Bandit (ban'dit), n. pl. Bandits, Banditti cally: generally intended to con (banodits, ban-ditti). [It, bandito, pp. of that each party is trying to ge bandire, to proclaim, to banish or proscribe of the other, either in politene by proclamation. See BAN.] An outlaw; other way; as, to bandy compli also in a general sense a robber; a highway bandy hasty words.' Shak. man; a lawless or desperate fellow. Hun

Do you bandy looks with me, you ra gry banditti.' Sir W. Scott.

3. To agitate; to toss about, a Bandittot (ban-dit'to), a. [Sing. of banditti.

to man. See BANDIT.) Outlawed; lawless; desper

Let not known truth be bandied in ate.

A Roman sworder and banditto slave
Murdered sweet Tully.

Shak.

Bandy (ban'di), v.i. To conten

whether in emulation or in en Bandittot (ban-dit'to), n. A bandit. Web

fit to bandy with thy lawless sc ster.

Bandy (ban'di), a. [Fr. banda Bandle (ban'dl), n. [Ir. bannlamh, a cubit BANDY, a club.] 1. Bent, espe --bann, a measure, and lamh, the hand.] a bend or crook outwards: said An Irish measure of 2 feet in length.

legs; as, his legs are quite baBandlet, Bandelet (band'let, band'e-let), n. bandy leg, or crooked

nose [Fr. bandelette, dim. of bande.) 1. In arch.

2. Limp; without sufficient sul any little band or flat moulding, as that of bad cloth. which crowns the Doric architrave.—2. A Bandy (ban'di), n. (Tamil vare small band for encircling anything; as, an country vehicle much used in india-rubber bandlet.

extract. Band-master (band'mas-tér), n. The leader The framework of bandics is made or director of a band of music.

but of wood as strong as possible. Ab Bandog (ban'dog), n. (Band and dog, lit. a semicircular awning of bamboos su bound-dog; D. band-hond, a chained dog. )

of cloth or canvas. The bandy is

vehicle, and as a rule possesses no A large, fierce kind of dog, in England gen kind. The conveyance is dragged b erally a mastiff, usually kept chained.

The keeper entered leading his bandog, a large Bandy-ball (ban'di-bal), n. Seebloodhound, tied in a leam or band, from which he Bandy-jig (ban'di-jig), n. takes his naine.

Sir W. Scott. dance practised by the lower Bandoleer (ban-do-lēr'), n.

[Sp. bando

performed with the toes and I lera, Fr. bandoulière, a large shoulder in. Mayhew. belt, from Sp. ban

Bandy-legged (ban'di-legd), da, a sash.] A large

bandy or crooked legs. leatherrı belt or bald.

Bandyman (ban'di-man), n. rick, to which were at

gaged in driving a bandy. tached a bag for balls

When also, as all over India, our and a number of pipes

speak of bandyment and bandies. or cases of wood or

anglicized is simply the old Tamilian metal covered with leather, each contain

Bane (ban), 7. [A. Sax. bana,

death, bane; Icel. bani, bane,de ing a charge of gun

Sw. bane, death; 0.H.G. bana, powder, worn by an

Goth. banja, a blow; allied to cient musketeers. The

murder, phenein, to slay. ] 1. R bandoleer was thrown

tion. The cup of deception over the left shoulder and hung under the

tempered to their bane.' Milto right arm, the ball bag

of a deadly quality; hence, an

of mischief, injury, or destruc occupying the lower

is the bane of society, most extremity, while

My death are the pipes were sus

My bane and antidote are both pended on either side. The name is sometimes

3. A disease in sheep, more con given to the small cases

the Rot. — SYN. Pest, ruin, de themselves, now super

jury. seded by cartridges.

Banet (băn), . 1. To poison; t Written also Bandi

Bandoleer.

stroy

For minors have not only baned fa: Bandoline (ban'dő-lén), n. A mucilaginous realins. perfumed substance, variously prepared Bane (bān), n. Bone. [Scotch from Iceland or Irish moss, strained quince Bane-berry (bān'be-ri), n. seeds, and gum tragacanth, and used in the name of plants of the genus A toilet to impart a glossy sleekness and a cer because of their nauseous pois tain stiffness to the hair; a kind of stick See ACTEA, pomatum,

Baneful (băn'ful), a. Destri Bandoline (ban'do-lēn), v.t. To render

cious; poisonous. 'Baneful glossy by the use of bandoline.

man. Baneful hemlock.' Bandoline (ban'dő-lēn), v.i. To apply ban- Banefully (hān'fyl-li), adv. doline to the hair. Dickens.

manner; perniciously; destru Bandont (ban'don), n. (0.Fr. and Pr. ban

Banefulness (băn'ful-nes), m. don See ABANDON.] Disposal; jurisdiction; of being baneful; destructive power.

ousness. Bandore (ban'dor), n. [Fr.; It. pandora, Bane-wort (bân'wert), n. A from L. pandura, and this from Gr. pan to two plants: (a) Atropa Bell doura, a musical instrument of three strings, also Deadly Nightshade; ( ascribed to Pan.) A musical stringed in flammula, from its being su] strument like a lute. Pepys.

bane to sleep. Band-pulley (band'pyl-i), n. A flat-faced Bang (bang), v.t. [Probably fr wheel Axed on a shaft and driven by a band; Comp. Icel, bang, a knocking a band-wheel.

club, the clapper of a bell; D. Bandrol (band'rol), n. Same as Banderole. 1. To beat, as with a club Bandsaw (band'sa), n. A saw consisting of thump; to cudgel. a steel belt with a serrated edge revolving

He having got some iron out o on wheels:

into his servants' bands to fence wi Bandsman (bandz'man), n. A musician another. who plays in a band.

2. To beat or handle roughl Bandstring (band'string), n. A string or to treat with violence.

tassel at one time worn as a pendant to a This desperate tempest hath so bi band or neckcloth. Jer. Taylor. Band-wheel (band'whel), n. Same as Band 3. To bring a loud noise fro pulley

slamming a door, and the lil

đ or

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bandera, a banner. See BANNER.) 1. In her, a

streamer affixed by small ppy

lines or strings immediately under the crook on the top of the staff of si bishop, and folding over

the staff. - A little Banderole. flag or streamer affixed

to a mast, a military weapon, or a trumpet; a pennon; a ban. drol.

From the extremity fluttered a small bonde role or streamer bearing a cross. Sir !!! Scat. 3, In Gothic arch, a form of spiral mould. ing. Called also Bandrol, Bannerot. Band-fish (band'tish), n. Ribbon-fish or snake-fish. One of the popular names of a genus (Cepola) of acanthopterygious fishes, very thin and flat in proportion to their length. They belong to the family Cepolida (which see) Bandicoot (ban'di-köt), 17. (A corruption of the Telinga name pandikoku, lit. pig-rat.) 1. The Mus giganteus, the largest known species of rat, attaining the weight of 2 or 3 lbs., and the length, including the toil, of 24 to 30 inches. It is a native of India, and is very abundant in Ceylon. Its flesh is said to be delicate and to resemble young pork,

con ark the

to

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ch, chain; ch, Sc. loch;

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and is a favourite article of diet with the d coolies. It is destructive to rice fields and

gardens.-2. A member of the family Peramelidæ, which bear a resemblance to the

true bandicoot. See PERAMELIDE. et, Bandikai (ban'di-), n. One of the names d

of the Abelmoschus esculentus. See ABEL

8, go;

MOSCHUS.

es,

ü, $c. abune; $, Sc. fey.

11;

BANISHER

214

BANKSLA

BANK-STOCK

d'Atstralia and Tasmania. The foliage is Banquet (bang'kwet), nentrenaels rariabile, and is rigid and coria. banchetto, a little seat, ke Many of the species are cultivated que, banco, a bench for

and hence a feast. See in the conservatories of Europe, where they x mach esteemed for their handsome feast; & rich entertain trigge and singular heads of flowers, a drink. A napkin of fin

the table at the coronat agle head often containing 600 flowers. Baul-stock (bangk'stok ), n. A share or aulay.-2.1 A light en shares in the capital stock of a bank. end of a feast; a dess Sunlieue (ban'lů)

, n. (Fr. ban, jurisdiction, which wine is drunk. al licue, LL leuca (of Celtic origin), a We'll dine in the great roc Gallie mile, a league, and, in the middle and banquet be prepared 2018, a district of indeterminate extent. There were all the dainties Crap G. bann-meile, with same sense.)

but of what art could add, v

fowl, baked and boiled meat The territory without the walls, but within the legal limits of a town or city: errone.

plenty, and exquisitely dress sasly spelled Banlieu, as if from Fr. lieu, a 3. Same as Banquette.piace

part of a horse's brid Banner (bau'ner), rh (Fr. bannière, Pr. and Feast, Banquet, Carouse It bandiera, L L. banderia, from bandum, Banquet (bang kwet), banner, standard, probably from Goth.band. feast or rich entertainn. 16, Sandra, a sign. The object of a standard

Just in u to serve as a mark or sign for the troops

The illustrious coinpany to rally round, and it was generally known by a name having this signification. Wedg. Banquet (bang kwet), wood. (See BAN.) Or from G. band, a band

regale one's self with go a strip of cloth, from binden, to bind.) 1. A

ing; to fare daintily, piece of drapery usually bearing some war.

The mind shall banquet like or heraldic device or national emblem, attached to the upper part of a pole or staff,

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1. To condemn to exile or compel to leave thrown open to the public. A national Bankerless (bangk'ér - les ), a. Without
one's country by authority of the ruling bank is one more or less closely connected bankers. Quart. Rev.
power or legal tribunals, either for life or with the government of a state, as the Bank Banket (bangk'et), n. (Dim of bank
for a limited time. Six years we banish of England (which is also a joint-stock (which see). ) A piece of wood on which
him.' Shak.-2. To drive away; to compel bank). Joint-stock banks are composed of bricklayers cut their bricks to the size
to depart or leave; to exile: in a general numerous partners, who,collectively, contri proper for the place into which they are
sense.‘Banish business; banish sorrow.' bute a large capital, and whose entire private about to lay them.
Cowley.

fortunes are liable for the debts of the Bank-fence (bangk'fens), n. A fence made
Those evils thou repeatest upon thyself

bank, unless it is a bank of limited liability. of a bank of earth.
Have banished me from Scotland. Shak. Banks of issue are such as issue notes that | Bank-hook (bangk’hök), n. A large variety
Banish, like expel, esclude, debar, discharge, form a paper currency. In London and for of hook for catching cod, used on the banks
excuse, and other similar words, sometimes 65 miles round no bank having more than of Newfoundland.
takes a double objective.

ten partners, save the Bank of England, can | Banking (bangk'ing), n. 1. The act of rais-
I banisk her my bed and company.

Shak.

issue its own notes. Banks of deposit are ing a mound or bank, or of inclosing with a

those whose operations are limited to taking bank.–2. The business or employment of a
- Banish, Exile, Expel are all used of forcible

charge of the money of their customers and banker; the business carried on by a bank.
removal Banish, lit. to put out of a com. circulating that in loans,&c.-6. The office in
munity by a ban or civil interdict, is a sort

3. A general term applied to fishing on the
which the transactions of a banking company
of general term signifying to compel or

great bank of Newfoundland.
are conducted. - 7. The funds of a gaming Banking (bangk'ing), a. Pertaining to or con-
cause to leave any place where one is in the

establishment; a fund in certain games at ducted by a bank; as, banking operations.
habit of being, or any society one has been

cards; as, a rouge et noir or faro bank.-8. In Bank-note (bangk'not), n. A promissory in the habit of frequenting ; exile, to cause

laro, (a) the bench or seat upon which the note issued by a banking company, payable to leave one's native place or country; expel,

judges sat. (0) The regular term of a court in gold or silver at the bank on demand. lit. to drive out, involves the idea of force,

of law or the full court sitting to hear argu Bank-notes form a portion of the currency and means to cast out forcibly or violently,

ments upon questions of law,as distinguished of various countries, and in England notes and often with disgrace.

from a sitting at nisi prius, or a court held of the Bank of England are a legal tender. Banisher (ban'ish-ér), n. One who banishes.

for jury trials.-9. A kind of table used by In England bank-notes under £5 are not To be full quit of those my banishers

printers.-10. In carp. a long piece of timber, used; but in Scotland and Ireland £l notes Stand I before thee bere.

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Were it a feast for funo and in some way indicative of dignity, rank,

I would not taste thy tre command, carried on occasions with

2. To take part in a 15 which ideas of dignity are connected, or as

feast. See BANQUET, a nark for troops to rally round; an ensign;

Then was the banqueting at Greenwich furnished E

these strangers, where the Banneral, Bannerol (ban'nér-al, ban'ner.

quct. El. A little flag; a banderole. "Beneath

Banquetantt (bangk
banquets; a banquete-

a standard; a flag.–2. In bot. the upper petal
da papilionaceous plant.

i

1

Shak.

especially of Ar-wood unslit, from 4 to 10 are circulated. See BANK.
Banishment (ban'ish-ment), n. 1. The act inches square.-11. A bench or row of keys Bank-post (bangk'post), n. A large kind of
of banishing or compelling a citizen to leave in an organ or similar instrument. -12. The letter paper, ranging in weight from 54 lbs.
his country by legal authority.

face of coal at which miners are working. to 10 lbs, a ream.
He secured himself by the banishment of his Bank (bangk), v.t. 1. To raise a mound'or Bankroutt (bangk'rout), n. a. and v. Same
enemies.

Fohnson. dike about; to inclose, defend, or fortity as Bankrupt.
2. The state of being banished; enforced with a bank; to embank; as, to bank a Bankrupt (bangk’rupt), n. [L. L. bancus, a
absence; expulsion; exile : either in a legal river. — 2. To lie around or encircle, as a bench (see BENCH), and ruptus, broken,
or general sense; as, banishment from thy bank; to constitute a bank round. Burn whence also 0.E. bankeroute, Fr. banque.
presence is worse than death.

ing Bands that bank the shrubby vales. route, lit. one whose bench has been broken,
Six frozen winters spent,

Thomson.-3. To pass by the banks of. from the fact that the bench or table which
Return with welcome home from banishment.

Have I not heard these islanders shout out 'Vive le a merchant or banker formerly used in the
Shak. roi' as I have banked their towns.

Shak. exchange was broken on his bankruptcy.)
3. The act of driving away or dispelling; as,

4. To lay up or deposit in a bank; as, he 1. A person declared by legal authority the banishment of care from the mind.

banked £500.-To bank a fire, to cover up unable to pay his debts, and brought under Banister (ban'is-tér), . A corruption of

a fire with ashes, and use other means, as the operation of the bankruptcy laws, all his Baluster.

closing the dampers and ashpit-door, to property being then taken and distributed
He struggled to ascend the pulpit stairs, holding make it burn low and at the same time to among his debtors. See under BANKRUPTCY.
bard on the banisters.

Sir W. Scott.
prevent its becoming extinguished.

2. Popularly, one who has wholly or parti-
Banjo (ban'jo), n. {Negro corruption of

The ship was lying at anchor with fires banked.

ally failed to pay his debts; one who has bandore (which see). ] The favourite musi

Macmillan's Mag.

compounded with his creditors; one notori-
cal instrument of the negroes of the South Bank (bangk), v.i. To have an account with ously unable to pay his debts; an insolvent;
ern States of America. It is six-stringed, a banker; to deposit money in a bank; to hence, one who is unable to satisfy just
has a body like a tambourine and a neck transact business with a bank or as a bank; claims of any kind made upon him.
like a guitar, and is played by stopping the to exercise the trade or profession of a

What a bankrupt I am made
strings with the fingers of the left hand and banker.

or a full stock of blessings. Ford. twitching or striking them with the fingers I dank with one of my son's fathers-in-law, and the Bankrupt (bangk’rupt). a. Having com

other bonds with me. of the right. The upper or octave string,

Thackeray.

mitted an act or acts of bankruptcy; unable
however, is never stopped.

Banka (bang'ka), n. A passage-boat without to pay just debts; insolvent; unable to meet
Bank (bangk), (A. Sax. banc, a bench, a outrigger, used on the river and roads at one's obligations. The king's grown bank-
bank, a hillock, with similar form and mean Manilla. It is formed of a single piece of rupt.' Shak.
ing in the other Teutonic languages: Sw. and wood, is 16 to 23 feet long, and carries three The beggared, the bankrupt society, not only
Dan. bank, bänk, Icel. bakki (for banki), D. or four passengers.

proved able to meet all its obligations, but ... grew
and G. bank. The word passed from the Ger. Bankable (bangk'a-bl), a. Receivable at a

richer and richer.

Macaulay.
man into the Romance tongues: Fr. banc, a bank, as bills; or discountable, as notes. Bankrupt (bangkrupt), v.t. To break one
bench, banque, a banking establishment; it. Bank-agent (bangk'a-jent), n. A person

in trade; to make insolvent; to render un-
banco, a bench, counter, a bank. On the employed by a bank to conduct its banking able to meet just claims.
revival of commerce in the twelfth century operations in a branch office.

We cast off the care of all future thrift because we
the money dealers in the Italian cities, Bank-bill (bangk'bil), n. 1. A note or å bill are already bankrupled.

Hammond, which then engrossed nearly all the trade of exchange of a bank, payable at some Bankruptcy (bangk’rupt-si), n. The state of Europe, carried on their business in the future specified time. Such bills are nego of being a bankrupt or insolvent; inability public markets, conducting their dealings tiable, but form, in the strict sense of the to pay all debts ; failure in trade. --Bankon benches, whence bank as applicable to term, no part of the currency.-2. A promis. ruptcy commissioner, a judicial officer apan establishment for the custody and issue sory note of a bank payable to the bearer on pointed to investigate and adjudicate upon of money.) 1. A mound, pile, or ridge of demand, and forming part of the currency; the affairs of bankrupts. Act of bankruptcy, earth raised above the surrounding plain. a bank-note. (American.)

in law, an act, the commission of which by They cast up a bank against the city.

Bank-book (bangk'buk), n. The pass-book a debtor renders him liable to be adjudged

2 Sam. xi. 15. given to a customer, in which the officers of a bankrupt. Acts of bankruptcy are such 2. Any steep acclivity, as one rising from the bank enter his debits and credits. The as the assignment of his property by a debtor a river, a lake, or the sea, or forming the initials of the teller or accountant of the to a trustee for the benefit of his creditors; side of a ravine, or the steep side of a hillock bank to the sums entered in the bank-book the making of a fraudulent conveyance or on a plain.

to the credit of the customer constitute a transfer of his property; departing from the Tiber trembled underneath her banks, Shak. valid receipt

country or remaining out of it in order to 3. A bench in a galley; hence, the number Bank-credit (bangk’kred-it), n. A credit

defeat or delay creditors; the filing in court of rowers seated on one bench.

with a bank, by which, on proper security of a declaration of inability to pay debts; Meantime the king with gifts a vessel stores,

given to the bank, a person receives liberty non-payment after being duly served with

to draw to a certain extent agreed upon: in
Supplies the banks with twenty chosen
oars.

a debtor's snmmons to pay a sum due of not
Dryden.

Scotland called also & Cash-account. Such less than £50. Any one or more of these 4. An elevation or rising ground in the sea, credits were long a distinctive feature of acts may lead to a debtor being declared a composed of sand or other soil, and either Scotch banking,

bankrupt on petition from a creditor to
partly above water or covered everywhere Banker (bangk'ér), n. 1. One who keeps a whom he is indebted not less than £50.
with shoal water; a shoal; a shallow; as, the bank: one who trafics in money, receives and Bankrupt-laws (bangkrupt-laz), n pl
banks of Newfoundland; the Dogger bank remits money, negotiates bills of exchange, system of statutory regulations under which
in the German Ocean-5. An establishment

&c. • The Lombard bankers.' Dryden. the property and effects of a person on his
which trades in money; an establishment 2. A vessel employed in the cod-fishery on becoming insolvent are distributed among
for the deposit, custody, and issue of money, the banks of Newfoundland. J. Q. Adams. his creditors. The bankrupt-laws have the
as also for granting loans, discounting bills, 3. The bench or table upon which bricklayers double object of enforcing a complete dis-
and facilitating the transmission of remit. and stone-masons prepare and shape their covery and equitable distribution of the
tances from one place to another; a company material; a banket. - 4. In the fine arts, property and effects of an insolvent, and of
or association carrying on such business a modeller's bench provided with a circular conferring on the bankrupt the advantage
Banks may be classed in various ways, as platform turning on wheels so that the of security of person, and a discharge from
private, national, joint-stock, banks of issue, hgure can be revolved to expose any portion all future claims of his creditors.
c. Private banks are established by one to the light. -5. A cushion or covering for a Banksia (bangk'si-a). 1. (From Sir Joseph
or more men of large capital, whose integrity
seat. Weale. (Rare.)

Banks, a distinguished naturalist, and com.
and fortune are securities for the sums in Bankeress (bangk'er-es). n. A female panion of Captain Cook.) A genus of trees
trusted to them.
Their shares are not banker; a banker's wife. Thackeray.

and shrubs, nat. order Proteaceæ, natives
Fåte, fir, fat, fall; mé, met, hêr; pine, pin; note, not, move; tube, tub, bull; oil, pound; ü, Sc. abune; S. Sc. ley.

the shade of stately banneral. Keats.

Are te Bannered (ban'nerd), a. Furnished with, or Other great banque bearing a banner; displaying banners. A bannered host , under spread ensigns march Banqueter (bangkwe

one who lives delicate ing' Milion

Great banqueters dos Banneret (ban’nėr-et)

, n. (From banner.) 1 (6) A higher degree of knighthood con 2. One who provides fa ferred on the field for some heroic act.

ments. The person upon whom the degree was Banquet-ball (bang! conferred Bannerets formerly constituted which banquets are an order of knights or feudal lords, who led

hall. “The fair Peleian their fassals to battle under their own flags.

son. After a victory the banneret elect, carrying Banqueting (bangky his pennon in his hand, was conducted be.

feasting; luxurious ) Feen two knights of yote and presented to

ment; a feast. "Exc the king or general

, who cut off the point or banquetings.' 1 Pet
end of his pennon, making it square. He
was then called a knight of the square flag.

Banqueting-hall
The bannerets were a middle order between Banqueting - house

Same as Banquet-hai barons and simple knights.

(bang kwet-ing-hous St Richard Croftes, made banneret at Stoke, was house where enterta

Camden
. The highest officer in some of the Swiss

In a banqueting-kou

trees, the table was set. republics, banner-bearer. Melchior Sturmthal, Banneret of Berne.' Sir W. Scott.

A banquet-house salute 21 A little bander; a banneral

Banqueting-room The scars and the bannerets about thee did mani.

A saloon or spaciou lesly disease one from believing thee a vessel of too Banquette (bah-ke

tainments. bench, a bank.) 1 way or foot bank,

of a parapet, on wl Bannet (san'net), t. A bonnet. Sir W. Scott.

fire upon the enem way. -2. The foo

raised above the bean or curse; an execration or cursing of Bans, n. pl. See !

senses written als another. 'Especially when the names of Banshee, Benshi

(Gael ban-sith, fe bean, ban, woma kind of female fa

i vise n.

creat a burden.
Bannerless (ban'nėr-les), a. Having no

bander. J. H. Jesse
Bannerol See BASSERAL.

(Scotch]

Sanning (baníng), n. The act of uttering a

nition

(Scotch |

the infernal Bends or unlucky soules are used in such bannings.' Holland. Bannitiont (ban-'shon), n. [LL. bannitio. See BANISH.) The act of banishing, or state and some parts of theing banished; expulsion; banishment. itself to a partic You will take order, when he comes out of the

pear before the Cantle, to send him out of the university too by bar.

family. Abp. Land

The banshee is a Bannock (ban'nok), n. (Gael bonnach, Ir.

who, in the shape o beriman, bannock] A cake made of oat

has been known to

a mournful supernat meal, barley-meal, or pease-meal baked on

of great houses, to R3 Iron plate or griddle over the fire. them were soon to

great family in Ire Bannock-Auke (ban'nok-Múk), 1. (From

tended regularly its supposed resemblance in form to a ban

songs have

been di rek) A turbot. (Scotch.)

Banstickle (bai Banos (hanz), 7.pl (Bee BAN.) The PTO

a bone, and sti claration in church Dasary to constitute acanthopterygi a regular marriage, made by calling the terosteus (G. wames of the parties intending matrimony. Stickleback. $ for the purpose of enabling any one who is Bantam (ban't cognizant of a valid objection to state it be fore it be too late in the Church of Eng.

spirited breed

leathered shar land the proclamation is made by the clergyman, in the Church of Seralara gener

East Indies, at

name from B ally by the session-cierks or presentout. The proclamation is mo banget Dorasty in šest Japan, only

painted or cal land Purmerly spelled also Bana Bantam (ban

ch. chain: , Sc. back, j. job; 6. Fr. ton;

[blocks in formation]

Banteries (heus'a-la). Without

sakars Quartet Banket (hangset. * [Dim of bank (which see) A piece of wood on which bricklayers at the bricks to the size proper for the place into which they are about to lay them Bank-fende hangles)

, . A lence made of a bank of earth Bank-book bangt hok, T. A large variety of book for catching ood, used on the banks of Newfoundland Banking (bangking) * 1 The act of raising a moand or bank, or of inclosing with a bank - The business or employmbent of a banker; the basins carried on by a bank

A general term applied to fishing on the great bank of Newfoundland. Banking (bangking), 2. Pertaining to or con

ducted by a bank; as, banking operations Bank-mote (bangk'not r A promissory note issued by a banking company, payable in gold or silver at the bank on demand Bank-notes form a portion of the currency of various countries and in England notes of the Bank of England are a legal tender. In England bank-notes under £5 are not used; but in Scotland and Ireland A1 notes

are circulated. See BANE 8 Bank-post (hangképāst), 1. A large kind of

letter paper, ranging in weight from 51 lbs. to 10 lbs. a ream

Bankrout + (bangk'rout), 1. A. and . Same y

as Bankrupt.

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& Bankrupt (bangkrupt), 2. (L.L bancus

, a
bench (see BENCH), and ruptus, broken,
whence also 0.E. bankeroute, Fr. banque
route, lit. one whose bench has been broken,
from the fact that the bench or table which
a merchant or banker formerly used in the
exchange was broken on his bankruptcy.

1. A person declared by legal authority
IP

unable to pay his debts, and brought under

the operation of the bankruptcy laws, all his to

property being then taken and distributed to

among his debtors. See under BANKRUPTCY, 2. Popularly, one who has wholly or partially failed to pay his debts; one who has

compounded with his creditors; one notori-
th ously unable to pay his debts; an insolvent;
to

hence, one who is unable to satisfy just
claims of any kind made upon him.

What a bankrupt I am sade

Of a full stock of blessings
The Bankrupt (bangk’rupt)

, 2. Haring com-
mitted an act or acts of bankruptes; unable
ut

to pay just debts; insolvent; unable to meet

one's obligations. The king's grown bank. of rupt.' Shak.

The beggared, the bankrupt society, not only proved able to meet all its obligations, bur...gre richer and richer.

Macaulay 3

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of Australia and Tasmania. The foliage is Banquet (bang kwet), n. [F extremely variable, and is rigid and coria banchetto, a little seat, a fer ceous. Many of the species are cultivated que, banco, a bench for sit in the conservatories of Europe, where they and hence a feast. See BAN are much esteemed for their handsome feast; a rich entertainmer foliage and singular heads of flowers, a drink. "A napkin of fine lin single head often containing 600 flowers. the table at the coronation Bank-stock (bangk'stok), n. A share or aulay.-2.1 A light entert shares in the capital stock of a bank.

end of a feast; a ssert Banlieue (ban'lū), n. (Fr. ban, jurisdiction, which wine is drunk. and lieue, LL. leuca (of Celtic origin), a We'll dine in the great room; Gallic mile, a league, and, in the middle And banquet be prepared her ages, a district of indeterminate extent.

There were all the dainties, no Comp. G. bann-meile, with same sense.] but of what art could add, venis The territory without the walls, but within

fowl, baked and boiled meats, bo the legal limits of a town or city: errone

plenty, and exquisitely dressed. ously spelled Banlieu, as if from Fr. lieu, a 3. Sane as Banquette.-4. A place.

part of a horse's bridle u Banner (bau'nėr), n. (Fr. bannière, Pr. and Feast, Banquet, Carousal. 3 It. bandiera, L.L. banderia, from bandum, Banquet (bang'kwet), v.t. banner, standard, probably from Goth.band feast or rich entertainment yo, bandva, a sign. The object of a standard

Just in time is to serve as a mark or sign for the troops

The illustrious coinpany ass to rally round, and it was generally known by a name having this signification. Wedg: Banquet (bangʻkwet), v.i. wood. (See BAN.) Or from G. band, a band

regale one's self with good or strip of cloth, from binden, to bind.] 1. A

ing; to fare daintily. piece of drapery usually bearing some war

The mind shall banquet thou like or heraldic device or national emblem,

Were it a feast for Juno wher attached to the upper part of a pole or staff, I would not taste thy treason and in some way indicative of dignity, rank,

2. To take part in a light or command, carried on occasions with which ideas of dignity are connected, or as

feast. See BANQUET, n. 2. a mark for troops to rally round; an ensign;

Then was the banqueting.ch

at Greenwich furnished for t a standard; a flag.-2. In bot. the upper petal these strangers, where they di of a papilionaceous plant.

get. Banneral, Bannerol (ban'nér-al, ban'ner: Banquetantt (bang'kwetol), 1. A little flag; a banderole. Beneath

banquets; a banqueter. the shade of stately banneral.' Keats.

Are there Bannered (ban'nerd), a. Furnished with, or

Other great banquetants bearing a banner; displaying banners. A bannered host, under spread ensigns march- Banqueter (bang kwet-ér)

one who lives delicately. ing' Milton. Banneret (ban'nėr-et), n. (From banner.)

Great banqueters do seldor 1. (a) A higher degree of knighthood con 2. One who provides feasts ferred on the field for some heroic act.

ments. (6) The person upon whom the degree was Banquet-ball (bang'kwet conferred. Bannerets formerly constituted

which_banquets are hel an order of knights or feudal lords, who led hall. The fair Peležan bani their vassals to battle under their own flags.

son. After a victory the banneret elect, carrying Banqueting (bangʻkwet-i his pennon in his hand, was conducted be

feasting; luxurious livin tween two knights of note and presented to ment; a feast.

Excess o the king or general, who cut off the point or

banquetings.' 1 Pet iv. end of his pennon, making it square.

He

Banqueting-hall (bang was then called a knight of the square fag. Same as Banquet-hall. The bannerets were a middle order between Banqueting - house, barons and simple knights.

(bang kwet-ing-hous, ban Sir Richard Croftes, made banneret at Stoke, was house where entertainme a wise man.

Camden.

In a banqueting house, ar 2. The highest officer in some of the Swiss trees, the table was set, republics; banner-bearer. Melchior Sturm

A banquet-house salutes the thal, Banneret of Berne.' Sir W. Scott.3. A little banner; a banneral.

Banqueting-room (bang

A saloon or spacious ha The scarfs and the bannerets about thee did mani. tainments. sestly dissuade me from believing thee a vessel of too

Banquette (ban-ket), n. great a burden.

Shak.

bench, a bank.) 1. In Bannerless (ban'nėr-les), a. Having no way or foot bank, runni banner. J. H. Jesse.

of a parapet, on which is Bannerol. See BANNERAL.

fire upon the enemy in t Bannet(ban'net), n. A bonnet. Sir W. Scott. way. – 2. The footway [Scotch.)

raised above the carri Banning (ban'ing), n. The act of uttering & senses written also, but ban or curse; an execration or cursing of Bans, n. pl. See BANNS another. “Especially when the names of Banshee, Benshi (bar the infernal fends or unlucky soules are (Gael. ban-sith, female used in such bannings.' Holland.

bean, ban, woman, and Bannitiont (ban-ioshon), T. [LL. banmitio. kind of female fairy bels See BANISH.) The act of banishing, or state and some parts of Sco of being banished; expulsion; banishment. itself to a particular ho

You will take order, when he comes out of the pear before the death castle, to send him out of the university too by ban. family. nition.

Abp. Laud.

The banshee is a species Bannock (ban'nok), n. (Gael. bonnach, Ir. who, in the shape of a little boinneag, bannock.) A cake made of oat

has been known to appear, meal, barley-meal, or pease-meal baked on

a mournful supernatural voic

of great houses, to warn the an iron plate or griddle over the fire. them were soon to die. In th (Scotch.)

great family in Ireland had Bannock-fluke (ban'nok-flūk), n. [From

tended regularly, but latte its supposed resemblance in form to a ban

songs have been discontinue nock.) A turbot. (Scotch.)

Banstickle (ban'stik-1), Banns (banz), n. pl. (See BAN.] The pro a bone, and sticel, a p clamation in church necessary to constitute acanthopterygious fish a regular marriage, made by calling the terosteus (G, aculeatu names of the parties intending matrimony, Stickleback. See STICE for the purpose of enabling any one who is Bantam (ban'tam), n. cognizant of a valid objection to state it be spirited breed of don fore it be too late. In the Church of Eng. feathered shanks first land the proclamation is made by the East Indies, and suppo clergyman, in the Church of Scotland gener name from Bantam ir ally by the session-clerk or precentor. The painted or carved worl proclamation is no longer necessary in Scot Japan, only more gaud land. Formerly spelled also Bans.

Bantam (ban'tam), a. ch, chain; ch, Sc. loch; 6. go; j. job: , Fr. ton; ng, sing;

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Bankrupt (bangk’rupt), v.1. To break one
in trade; to make insolvent; to render -
able to meet just claims.

We cast off the care of all future thrift because
are already bankrupted.

Hari
me Bankruptcy (bangk rupt-si), n. The state

of being a bankrupt or insolvent; inability

to pay all debts, failure in trade-BankS

ruptcy commissioner, a jndicial officer ap

pointed to investigate and adjudicate upon
y:

the affairs of bankrupts. - Ad of bankruptes,
in law, an act, the commission of which by
a debtor renders him liable to be adjudged
a bankrupt. Acts of bankruptcy are such
as the assignment of his property by a debtor
to a trustee for the benefit of his creditors:
the making of a fraudulent conveyance or
transfer of his property; departing from the

country or remaining out of it in onier to
it defeat or delay creditors; the filing in court

of a declaration of inability to pay debts, F non-payment after being duly served with

a debtor's summons to pay a sum dne or not ch

less than £50. Any one or more of these
acts may lead to a debtor being declared a
bankrupt on petition from a creditr bo

whom he is indebted not less than £50
d Bankrupt-laws (bangkrupt-laz), n. pl. A

system of statatory regulations under which
the property and effects of a person on his
becoming insolvent are distributed among
his creditors. The bankrupt-laws have the
double object of enforcing a complete dis

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covery and equitable distribution of the
property and effects of an insolvent

, and a
conferring on the bankrupt the seranta
of security of person, and a discharge from

all future claims of his creditors s Banksia (bangk'si-a), 7 (From Sir Joseph

Bands, a distinguished naturalist, and com panion of Captain Cook] A zenas df trees and shrubs, nat, order Proteica, D8172

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oil, pound; ü, Sc abune; & fig.

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