Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

BATE

231

bearing a fancied resemblance to a horseshoe. Its use is uncertain: some believe it merely serves for closing the nostrils. Bats may be conveniently divided into two sections - the insectivorous or carnivorous, comprising the vampire and all Europeall

, African, and American species; and the fruit-eating (the Pteropina), belonging to tropical Asia and Australia. See PTEROPUS. Bat (bat or bạ), n. (Fr. bat, 0. Fr. bast, L. L. bastum, a saddle. See BASTARD.) A pack

saddle; hence bat-horse; batman (which see). Batablet Bateablet (bāt'a-bl), 2. Abbreviation of Debatable, as in the term batable grounel, batable land. "As we crossed the Bateable land.' Border ballad. See under DEBATABLE Batardeau (bat-ärd-7), 12. (Fr.) 1. A cofferdam; a casing of piles made water-tight, fixed in the bed of a river to exclude the water from the site of the pier or other work while it is constructing.–2. In fort. a strong gate to separate the wet from the dry part of a ditch, provided with a sluice-gate. Batatas (ba-ta'tas), n. (Malayan name of the plant.) A genus of plants, nat, order Convolvulacex, containing about twenty species of tropical creeping

or twining herbs or shrubs; the sweet potato. The tuberous root of B. edulis was much eaten in the

[ocr errors]

е

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

3

south of Europe before the cultivation of the potato, which both became a substitute for it and appropriated its name. It is so universally distributed over the tropical and subtropical regions of the world that it is impossible to say to what country it is indigenous. It has a sweetish taste, is more nutritious than the potato, and is largely cultivated for food. It is said to attain a weight of 50 lbs. in Java, though ordinarily it is from 3 to 12 lbs. in weight. Batavian (ba-tā'vi-an), a. (From Batavi, the latinized form of the name of a people anciently inhabiting an island at the mouth of the Rhine.) 1. Pertaining to Holland or its inhabitants. 'Batavian grace.' Disraeli. 2. Pertaining to Batavia in Java. Batavian (ba-tá'vi-an), n. 1. A native of Holland.-2. A native of Batavia, the capi. tal of all the Dutch possessions in the East Bat-bolt (bat'bõlt), 12. A bolt barbed or jagged at its butt or tang to give it a firmer hold. Batch (bach)

[graphic]

BATE

, [From the verb to bake, like Dan. bagt, G. gebäck, a batch. For a similar change of k into ch compare make (an equal) and match, wake and watch, Sc. thack, E. thatch. See BAKE.) 1. The quantity of bread baked at one time; a baking of bread. The joiner puts the boards into ovens after the

Mortimer. batch is drawn. 2. Any quantity of a thing made at once, or so united as to have like qualities; any pumber of individuals or articles similar to

6.1 To take away; to remove.

bath introduced from th About autumn bate the earth from about the roots the patient having underg of olives, and lay them bare.

Holland. spiration in an apartn7.1 To rob or deprive of.

heated air, is afterwar

various processes, as S When baseness is exalted, do not bale The place its honour for the person's sake. kneading (shampooing), &c

G. Herbert. proceeding to an outer apa Batet (bāt), v.i. To grow or become less; to on a couch to cool, m remit or retrench a part: sometimes with of. coffee, sherbet, &c. Turki Do I not bate? do I not dwindle?' Shak.

fications of them are to be Abate thy speed and I will bate of mine. Dryden, hydropathic establishmer Batet (bát), v.i. [Fr. battre, to beat. ] In towns of considerable si falconry, to flutter with the wings as pre

bath, when simply of the

the most efficient of all paring for flight, particularly at the sight of

3. An edifice containing prey.

I am like a hawk that bates but cannot fly because up for bathing; a bath-h I am ty'd to another's fist.

Bacon. of bathing or of exposing Batet (bát), v.t. To bait; to molest; to har agent, as water, steam, he ass. Barking and biting all that him do or health.-5. In science bate.' Spenser.

vessel containing a liquid Bate (bat), pret. of bite. [Old English and

is immersed; as in phos Scotch.)

which solutions are contai Yet there the steel staid not, but inly bate

an apparatus for modifyir Deep in the flesh, and open'd wide a red flood-gate.

the heat in various chem

Spenser. interposing a quantity o Bate (bāt), v.t. [Perhaps for abate.) To other substance between steep in an alkaline solution, to remove or vessel intended to be neutralize the lime which has been used to liquid bath of a higher take the hair from hides.

212° is required, saturat Bate (bāt), n. The alkaline solution in

employed, in which the which hides are steeped after being limed higher than that of wat to remove or neutralize the lime.

chemical bath for higher Batea (bä'te-a), n. [Sp.). In gold mining, a can be produced by liquia conical-shaped dish used for washing gold fusible metal, tin, or lead and pulverized samples of gold quartz. this purpose. --Knights of Bateau (bä-to'), n. (Fr. bateau; Ó, Fr. batel, of knighthood supposed a boat, à dim. from L.L. batus, a boat, from stituted at the coronatio the Germanic. See BOAT.) 1. A light boat, 1399. It received this n long in proportion to its breadth, and wider cumstance of the candida in the middle than at the ends.-2. A pon being put into a bath the toon of a floating bridge.

to denote a purification Bateau-bridge (bä-to'brij), n. Milit. a float their former misdeeds, ar ing bridge supported by bateaux or boats. now to commence a new Bate-breedingt (bātbrēd-ing), a. Breeding order of the Bath, howev

strife. This bate-breeding spy.' Shak. by George I. in 1725. Batefult (bāt'fựl), a. Contentious; given to order, and consisted, strife; exciting contention. “It did bateful sovereign, of a grandquestion frame.' Sidney.

master and thirty-six Batelesst (bát'les), a. Not to be abated; not companions. In 1815 the to be dulled or blunted. (Rare. ]

order was greatly exHaply that name of Chaste'unhappily set

tended, and in 1847 openThis bateless edge on his keen appetite. Shak, ed to civilians. It is Batementt (bāt'ment), n. 1. Abatement; now composed of three deduction; diminution. Specifically-2. That classes, viz., military part of wood cut off by a carpenter to make

and civil knights grandit fit for his purpose.

crosses, G.C.B.; knightsBat-fowler (bat'foul-ér), n. One who prac

commanders, K.C.B.; and tises or takes pleasure in bat-fowling.

knights-companions, C.B. Bat-fowling (bat'foul-ing), n. A mode of The badge (fig. 1) is a go catching birds at night by holding a torch points, with the lion of En or other light, and beating the bushes or four principal angles, and trees where they roost. The birds flying to

in the centre the rose, the light are caught with nets or otherwise.

rock,

between Batfuit (bat'ful), a. [O.E. bat, increase;

three imperial allied probably to Icel. batna, to grow better; crowns; motto, A. Sax. bet, better. Comp. also Icel. beit, Tria juncta in pasture, beita, to graze, E. bait.) Rich; fer uno.

Stars are tile, as land. Batful pastures.' Drayton. also worn by the Bath (bäth), n. [A. Sax. bæth, a bath. Com two first classes. mon to all the Teutonic tongues save Gothic; That of the 0. Sax. Icel, bath, Dan. D. G. bad, a bath.] 1. A knights grandvessel for holding water in which to plunge, crosses (fig. 2) is wash, or bathe the body.-2. More generally, of silver, with an apartment or apparatus by means of which eight points of the body, or a part of it, may be surrounded rays wavy, on by any medium differing in nature or tem

which is a gold perature from its natural medium. There are cross bearing three croy so many varieties of baths that it would be ribbon displaying the n endless to endeavour to enumerate all. They

while beneath is a scroll have been divided into four classes : (a) AC

The star of the command cording to the substance in which the body wanting the wavy rays. is immersed; as, water, oil, compressed air, Bath (bäth), n. [Heb.] medicated, mineral, &c. (b) According to measure, corresponding manner of application; as, plunge, shower, measure, being like it t vapour, douche, spray, &c. (c) According to

homer. See EPHA. the parts bathed; as, foot, sitz, eye, &c. Bath-brick (bäth'brik), (d) According to temperature; as, hot, tepid, of Bath, in Somersetshir warm, cold. - A compressed air bath is taken

siliceous earth in the fo by remaining for a longer or shorter period for cleaning knives. It i in a chamber filled with compressed air.

Parret, Somersetshire, Such baths have been recommended as use.

consist of the siliceous ful in certain diseases, in which an increased Bath-bun (bäth'bun), n. expansive force is required for the air to in Bath.) A sort of light ftate the more delicate air-passages of the generally mixed with cu lungs. - A medicated bath is a liquid or Bath-chair (bäth'chār), vapour bath designed to produce a curative of Bath.) A small carri: effect by virtue of some medicine mixed in it. pushed along by an a

- A natural mineral bath consists of spring invalids.
water naturally impregnated with some Bathe (bātu), v. t. pret.
mineral, as iron, sulphur, certain salts, &c. bathing. (A. Sax. bathi
Such baths are resorted to by invalids in bade, D. and G. baden.
great numbers, and several towns derive immerse in water, as
their names from them, as Bath, Baden pond, or artificial bath
Baden, Wiesbaden, &c.Turkish bath, a sure, health, or cleanlin

Times neuspaper

each other

The Turkish troops are being hurried to the front in balches of 40,000 at a time.

Large batches of which were from time to time carried into the private room by another clerk for the judge's signature

Dictons. 3. In mining, the quantity of ore sent to the surface by any pair of men. Batch (bach), 0. l. To protect the bank of a river by facing it with stones, so as to pre

vent the water from eating into it. (Local.] Batchelor (bach'el-ér). n. An erroneous

mode of spelling Bachelor. Batek (bit) 2. [A. Sax bate, contention; or simply an abbreviation of debate; comp. batable.) Strite; contention. 'Breeds no bate with telling.' Shak. Bate (bat)

, v.t. pret. & pp. bated; ppr. bating. Abbrev, for abate(which see). 1. To beat down; to impair the strength of; to weaken.

These griefs and losses have so bated me,

That I shall hardly spare a pound of flesh. Shak. 2. To doll or blunt.

Spite of cormorant devouring time, The endeavour of this present breath may buy That honour, which shall bate his scythe's keen edge.

Shah To lessen by retrenching, deducting or educing. [Rare.]

He must either bate the labourer's wages, or not moploy or not pay him.

Locke
To allow by way of abatement or deduc-
on; to abate
These are the conditions of his treating with God,
whom he dates nothing of what he stood upon
th the Parliament.

South
To leave out; to except; to bar.
Bat me te king, and, be he fest and blood,
He ljes who said it

Bean & FT

ch, chain; ch, Sc. loch;

8. go;

j, job;

ú, Fr. ton;

ng, sing;

Ü, Sc abune; Sc fry.

233

BATHYERGUS

232

BATTEN

BATTEN

Elettered jade.

het 3 inches thick, nailed to the beams Batter-rule, Batteringthe ship, instead of cleats, to sling the bat'tér-ing-rol), n. A plu

trived that while the plum mua's hammocks to.-3. In weaving, the lesz tar striking the weft home; a lathe. cally, the wall to which it Basten (hat'n), 0.6. To form or fasten with be sloping or battered. lates - To batten down, to fasten down plumb-line attached to at with tattens, as the hatches of a ship during one side of which is fixed

angle with the line. Es bad the post-holes of his cabin battened down. Battery (bat'tér-1), 1. [F:

Thackeray. battre, to beat. See BATTE hteping (bat'n-ing), n. 1. The operation of battering; attack or a fring battens to walls for nailing laths view of beating down, as 2-2 Battens fixed to a wall, to which the or ordnance. kaths for plaster are fixed.

At one place above the rest, Saver (bat'têr), v.t. (Fr. battre, It. battere, there was such a breach as the abest, to strike, to batter, from L.L. batere, naked to the enemie. a form of L datuere, to beat, whence also

2. The instrument or agen intle] 1. To beat with successive blows;{ battering or attacking; as, to beat with violence, so as to bruise or

a battery of abuse. Spec dent; to attack as by a battering-ram or

a body of cannon for feld 1975 ordnance, with the view of shattering sisting generally of from er demolishing; to cannonade.

(in the British service u We were the walls beaten with the rams, and

complement of waggons, auty parts thereof shaken and battered. Holland,

4. The personnel or comp ? To wear or impair, as by beating, long and men attached to such kuries, or the like; as, a battered paveinent; fort. a parapet thrown up

pers and others employed The Tory party, according to those perverted ness of Torgisa unhappily too long prevalent in

the enemy's shot, with the S coentry, was held to be literally defunct, except

-Cross batteries, two bat bates de hattered cones of office. Disraeli.

athwart each other, forme 1 In forging, to spread metal outwardly by battery which plays

obliqu

the object battered. Enhammering on the end. E. II. Knight (From noun batter.) To paste together

lines.-- Enfilade battery, with batter or other adhesive matter.

scours or sweeps the whol

En-revers battery, one wh Batter (bat'tér), . 1. To make attacks, as

enemy's back. - Floating la battering-ram or ordnance.

erected either on simple Beegers break ground at a safe distance, and

hulls of ships, for the det trece gradually till near enough to batter.

or for the bombardmen Abp. Whately.

ports.-6. In law, the un another. The least deg: even the touching of ano stitutes a battery.-7. In coated jars placed in s they may be charged at discharged in the same battery, a pile or series and zinc, or of any substa galvanic action. See un Battery-gun (bat'ter-i gun which can fire a nu secutively or simultane ping to reload; a gun w or with one barrel ang like a revolver pistol, gun or the mitrailleuse.

Rustch)

doubt the existence of such a substance, preparation of glue, by means of which it is Battalion (ba-talyon), n. pl. Battalions
maintaining that the apparent signs of an applied to the surface of the ware. Finely (ba-tal'yonz) or Battalia t (ba-talya). [Fr.
organic life in the matter which Huxley ground colour is dusted on, and the vessel bataillon, It. battaglione (aug. of battaglia,
examined were due to the alcohol in which is then ready to be fired in the enamel kiln. a battle), a main battle, à great squadroni.
the matter was preserved. Recently, how See PRESS-PRINTING.

See BATTLE.) 1. An army in battle artay.
ever, the North-polar navigator Bessels has Batrachia (ba-trā'ki-a), n. pl. (Gr. batra-

He through the armed files reported the discovery in Smith Sound, at chos, a frog.) The fourth order in Cuvier's Darts his experienced eye, and soon traverse the depth of 92 fathoms, of a free, undiffer arrangement of the class Reptilia. It com

The whole battalion views.

Nillo. entiated, homogeneous protoplasm, to which prises frogs, toads, newts, salamanders, 2. A division of an army in order of battle. he has given the name of Protobathybius. and sirens, and is equivalent to the class Next morning the king put his army into battalia. Bathyergus (bath-i-ér'gus), n. {Gr. bathys, Amphibia (which see). It is now usually

Clarendon. deep, and ergon, a work.] The genus of restricted to the order Anura, or amphi Specifically-3. A body of infantry, varying mammals to which the zandmole or sand bians which lose the tail when they reach

from about 300 to 1000 men, and usually
mole of the Dutch boers of South Africa (B. maturity. The Batrachia when young un forming a division of a regiment. Some.
suillus) belongs; called also the Coast-rat. dergo metamorphosis and breathe only by

times, however, a single battalion composes
It is a burrowing animal found in large gills. When adults they breathe by lungs, a regiment.
numbers around the Cape of Good Hope, or, as in the case of the axolotl, siren, and Battalioned (bat-tal'yond), a. Formed into
where it drives such multitudes of shallow proteus, by both lungs and gills. They are

battalions,
tunnels that the ground is rendered danger oviparous, and deposit eggs covered only by Battel (bat'tel), n. (See BATTLE.] Battle.
ous for horsemen. The fur is grayish-brown, a soft membrane.

-Wager of battel, in law, a species of trial
and might be a valuable article of com Batrachian (ba-trà'ki-an), a. (Gr. batrachos,

for the decision of causes between parties.
merce. It is of the size of a wild rabbit, a frog.) 1. In zool. pertaining to the order This species of trial is of high antiquity
and belongs to the family Spalaceidæ. Batrachia.--2. In bot. applied to the aquatic among the rude military peoples of Europe.
Bathymetrical (bath-i-met'ri-kal), a. Per species of the genus Ranunculus, which have It was introduced into England by William
taining to bathymetry, or to depth under been placed in a special genus (Batrachium) the Conqueror, and used in three cases only:
water.
by some authors.

in the court-martial, or court of chivalry or
Bathymetry (ba-thim'et-ri), n. {Gr. bathys, Batrachian (ba-trā'ki-an), n. An animal of honour; in appeals of felony; and in issues
deep, and metron, measure.] The art of the order Batrachia.

joined upon a writ of right. The contest sounding or of measuring depths in the sea. Batrachite (batéra-kit), n. [Gr. batrachos,

was held before the judges on a piece of Batideæ (ba-tid'é-ė), n. pl. A nat. order a frog.] 1. A fossil or stone in colour resem

ground inclosed, and the combatants were instituted by Martius for the Batis mari bling a frog; toadstone.--2. A variety of the bound to fight till the stars appeared, unless tima, a succulent shrub growing in salt mineral chrysolite, composed of silicates

the death or defeat of one party sooner demarshes in the West Indies, sometimes of lime and magnesia, in colour resembling

cided the contest. The weapons used were used in West India pickles. It has the the frog, and found in the mountains of batons or staves an ell long. Women, priests, habit of Salicornia, but its ovary has four Southern Tyrol. See OLIVIN.

men above sixty, and lame and blind percells, with one erect ovule in each cell, and Batrachoid (bat'ra-koid), a.. Having the

sons might appear by champions. Though
is consequently placed in a separate but form of a frog; pertaining to the Batrachia. long fallen into desuetude, it was a valid
closely allied nat. order to Chenopodiacea Batracholite (ba-trak'o-lit), n. [Gr. ba and legal mode of trial in England down to
Bating (båt'ing). Originally a part., but trachos, a frog, and lithos, a stone.) The

1818, and was then abolished in consequence
now used chiefly as a prep. Abating; name given to fossil remains of animals of of the defendant in a suit having demanded
taking away; deducting; excepting.
the frog kind, found in the tertiary forma-

this mode of arbitrament, and its being
Children have few ideas, bating some faint ideas
tions. In the newer tertiary strata near

found that it could not legally be denied
of hunger and thirst.
Locke. Oeningen, on the Rhine, several species of

him.
Batis (bā'tis), n. A genus of saline plants,

frogs, toads, and newts have been discov- Battel (bat'tel), n. (O. E, bat, increase, and
containing a single species. See BATIDER.
ered.

dæl, portion. ) 1 An account of the ex-
Batist, Batiste (bä-tēst'), N. (Fr. batiste, Batrachomyomachy (bat-ra-kom'i-om'a penses of a student at Oxford.—2. pl. Provi.
0.Fr. 'baptiste. From the name of its ki), n. [Gr. batrachos, a frog, mus, a mouse,

sions taken by Oxford students from the inventor Baptiste, a linen weaver of Cam

and maché, a battle.] A battle between the buttery; and also the charges thereon. -
brai, in French Flanders. His statue still frogs and mice, the name of a kind of parody

2. In Eton College, a small allowance of
stands there. ) 1. A fine linen cloth made
on the Niad.

food which, in addition to the college allow-
in Flanders and Picardy, of three different Batrachophagous (bat-ra-kof'a-gus),a. (Gr. ance, the collegers receive from their dames.

Richardson.
kinds or thicknesses; cambric.—2. An East batrachos, a frog, and phagein, to eat.) Feed-
India goods of similar quality.
ing on frogs.

Battel (bat'tel), v.i. [In third meaning per-
Batler (bat'ler), n. See BATLET.
Batrachospermeæ (ba-trak'Ô-spér"mē-ė),

1

-Te batter at, to make attacks upon; to
ty to overthrow or destroy.
The tyrant has not battered at their peace. Shak,
2. To incline from the perpendicular: said
dla wall whose face recedes as it rises: OP-
posed to overhang.
Retaining and breast walls batter towards the bank.

E. H. Knight.
Batter (bat'tër), n. (See BATTER, v.t.] 1. A
misture of several ingredients, as flour,
o, salt, &c., beaten together with some
liepoor, used in cookery. -2. The leaning
back of the upper part of the face of a wall,
ts in whart walls and retaining walls to
support embankments.-3. A glutinous sub-
statoe used for producing adhesion ; paste. Battil,+

[graphic]

haps a form of batten (which see).] 1. To stand Batlet (bat'let), n. (Dim. of bat.) A small n. pl. (Gr. batrachos, a frog, and sperma,

indebted in the college books at Oxford bat or square piece of wood with a handle seed.) A family of fresh-water confervoid for provisions and drink from the buttery. for beating linen when taken out of the algæ, that have articulated stems, with

2. To reside at the university; to keep terms. buck. Called also Batler, Battril.

whorls of necklace-like branches, and the 3. To grow fat. Spenser. I remember the kissing of her batlet, and the cow's spores in chains.

Battelt (bat'tel), v.t. To render fertile; to dugs that her pretty chopt hands had milked. Shak. Batrachus (batéra-kus), n. [Gr. batrachos,

batten. Batman (batman), n. An oriental weight.

a frog.] The frog-fish genus. See FROG Battelt (bat'tel), a. (Perhaps for batful; in In Bokhara it is equal to 291 lbs.; in Turkey FISH

any case connected with batten.) Fertile;

fruitful. _'A battel soil for grain, for pasture

A species of Voluta the great batman is about 1574 lbs., the lesser Bat-shell (bat'shel), n.

good.' Fairfax. only a fourth of the greater; at Aleppo and

of a dusky brown colour. Smyrna the batman weighs but 17 lbs.; in Batsman (bats'man), n. The man who wields Batteller, Battler (bat'tel-er, bat'l-ér), n.

1. A student at Oxford indebted in the colPersia 134 lbs. the bat in the game of cricket; the batter,

lege books for provisions and drink at the

Same as Batsman. Batman (bat'man, ba'man), n. (Fr. bat, Batster (bat'stěr), n.

buttery.-2. One who keeps terms or resides a pack-saddle. See BÄT, a pack-saddle.] A Bat's-wing Burner,n. A form of gas-burner from which there issues a jet supposed to

at the university person allowed by the government to every

Battement (bat'ment), n. [Fr.) A beating; company of a regiment on foreign service. resemble a bat's wing.

striking; impulse.

In hat-making, the material His duty is to take charge of the cooking Batt (bat), n. utensils, &c., of the company. There is in

for a felt hat obtained by the operation of Batten (bat'n), y.t. [Icel. batna, to grow the charge of the batman a bat-horse for bowing, and forming the basis of the skin. better, Goth. gabatnan, to avail, to profit,

from root bat, bet in better (which see), O.E. each company to convey the cooking utensils Batta (bat'ta), n. (Hind. battah.] 1. Defifrom place to place. ciency; discount; allowance.-2. An allow bot, increase, bete, to make better.) 1. To

fatten; to make fat; to make plump by plenBat-money, Baw-money (bat'mun-ni, ba'

ance, in addition to their pay, made to

troops serving in the East Indies, when in teous feeding. Battening our flocks with mun-ni), n. Money paid to a batman.

the fresh dews of night." Milton. — 2. To Batolite (bat'o-līt), n.

the field. While in garrison troops are al-
[Fr. baton, a staff,
lowed half batta.

fertilize or enrich land.
and Gr. lithos, a stone genus of straight Battablet (bat'a-bl), a. (See BATFUL, BAT- Batten (bat'n), v.i. To grow or become fat;
TEN.) Fattening; serviceable as pasture.

to live in luxury, or to grow fat in ease and the hippurites. Some are of great length,

Juxury. “To feed and batten on this moor.'
and form masses of rock in the high Alps. Masinissa made many inward parts of Barbary and
Baton (bat'on), n. [Fr. báton, O. Fr, baston.
Numidia in Africk (before his time, incult and horrid)

Shak.
fruitful and battable by this means. Burton,

Her savage birds See BASTE, BASTILE.] 1. A staff or club; a

O'er human carcasses do scream and datten. truncheon, the official badge of various om Battallantt (bat'tal-ant), n. {Fr. bataillant,

Baillie cials of widely different rank; thus we have

from batailler, to combat. See BATTLE.) A Thou battenest by the greasy gleam the baton of a field-marshal, of a constable combatant. Skelton.

Tennyson.

In haunts of hungry sinners. or policeman, and of a conductor of music.

Battailous ! (bat'tal-us), a. (0.Fr. batail. Batten (bat'n), n. [Fr. baton, a stick.) 1. A He held the baton of command.' Prescott.

lous, bateillons. See BATTLE.] Warlike; piece of wood from 1 inch to 7 inches broad, When I went home I made myself a baton, and

having the form or appearance of an army and from } in. to 2 in. thick. The batwent about the fields conducting an orchestra. arrayed for battle; marshalled, as for an

tens of commerce are 7 in. broad and 24 in. Dickens. attack.

thick; split into two boards each 1 in. 2. In music, a rest of four semibreves. --3. In The French came foremost balta ilous and bold.

thick, they are used for flooring, and split her. same as Baston, 3.

Fairfax.

into three, for putting on roofs below slates, Batoon 1 (ba-tön'), n. A club or truncheon. Battaliat (bat-tā’li-a),n. [It.battaglia, battle.

See BATTALION, BATTLE.) 1. Å host; an

wainscot, and as uprights for lathing. The Although his shoulders with batoon

best battens come from Norway.--2. Naut, Be claw'd and cudgell'd to some tune. Hudibras. army; a military force.

one of several thin pieces of oak or fir, nailed Bat-printing (bat'print-ing), n. The mode

Why, our battalia trebles that account.
Shah, Rich. III. v. 3. II.

to the mast-head, and to the midship post
of printing pottery adopted when the print-
[This is the reading of the folios; the quarto

of the yard.- Battens of the hatches, scanting is done on the glazed ware. For this editions read battalion 1-2. A division of

lings of wood or straitened hoops of casks, mode of printing a fine-lined engraving is an army in order of battle.

applied to confine the edges of the tarpaul executed on copper, after which the lines

In three dattatias does the king dispose

ings close down to the sides of the hatchof the engraving are filled with pure linseed

His strength, which all in ready order stand,

ways, to prevent the entrance of water in a oil, which is taken off by a sheet of a flexible And to each other's rescue tear at hand. May. storm. Tracing battens, pieces of wood Fāte, får, fat, fall; mẻ, met, her; pine, pin; note, not, move; tūbe, tub, bull; oil, pound; ü, Sc. abune; y, Sc. ley.

ren land.

Battillt (batti Batter (bat'ér), 9. In cricket, the man who

a. and v.t.) To make i

to batten. wields the bat; the batsman.

Ashes are marvellous in The bowler) bowls a ball almost wide to the off; the batter steps out, and cuts it beautifully to where core point is standing

T. Hughes.

Battii, Battill (bat'til) Batterer (hat'tèr-ěr), n. One who batters or beats. Batterers or demolishers of stately

Sleep, they said, would and elegant buildings.' Jer. Taylor.

Batting (bat'ing), n. 1 Battering-gun (bat'tèr-ing-gun), n. Milit.

a bat at play; as, the cannon of heavy calibre adapted for de

was excellent.--2. Cot molishing defensive works.

prepared for quilts or Battering-ram (hat'tèr-ing-ram), n. 1. In Battish (bat'ish), a. [ trilit, antiq, an engine used to beat down

Of or pertaining to or the walls of besieged places, consisting of a large beam, with a head of iron somewhat

She clasp'd his limbs, 1

With daitish lirubs. resembling the head of a ram, whence its mane in its simplest form it was carried Battle (bati), n. [Fr and forcibly driven against the wall by the

formerly also, a divis hands of the soldiers, but more commonly

battalia, battualia, t it was suspended by ropes to a beam which

exercises of soldiers was supported by posts, and balanced so as

batuere, to beat, to to swing backward and forward, being in

fight or encounter 1 this way impelled against the wall with

posing armies; an much more ease and effect. It was also

applied to armies but applicable also individuals, whethe mals.-2. A body o army; a battalion.

The king divided 1 whereof the vanguard 3. More specificall body of the army from the van and 1

Angus led the avan the battle a good dist the arrier,

The centre, or batt! sixty-three galleys, w (6) That portion placed and of wha as of main import

The cavalry, by w
battle, and on it alo
action.
4. An army PT
fight.

Battering-ram.
often mounted on wheels and worked under
coter, the assailants being protected by a
kind of shed.-2. A heavy blacksmith's ham-
mer, suspended, and worked horizontally.
Battering-train (bat'tèr-ing-trán), nt. Milit

.
1 train of heavy ordnance for siege opera-
tions

, Fr. ton

BATTEN

233

Battalion (ba-tal'yon), 4. pl. Battalions
(ha-tal'yonz) or Battalia (ba-tal'ya). (Fr.
bataillon, It battaglione (aug. of battaglia,
a battle), a main battle, a great squadron.
See BATTLE.) 17 An army in battle array.

He through the armed files
Darts his experienced eye, and soon traverse
The whole battalion views.

Millon
2. A division of an army in order of battle.
Next morning the king put his army into battalia,

Clarosdox. Specifically—3. A body of infantry, varying from about 300 to 1000 men, and usually forming a division of a regiment. Sometimes, however, a single battalion composes

a regiment. 1 Battalioned (bat-tal'yond)

, a. Formed into battalions. Battel (bat'tel), n. (See BATTLE.) Battle.

-Wager of battel, in law, a species of trial for the decision of causes between parties. This species of trial is of high antiquity among the rude military peoples of Europe. It was introduced into England by William the Conqueror, and used in three cases only: in the court-martial, or court of chivalry or honour; in appeals of felony; and in issues joined upon a writ of right. The contest was held before the judges on a piece of

2

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

I

e

S

e

ground inclosed, and the

combatants were bound to fight till the stars appeared, unless the death or defeat of one party sooner de cided the contest. The weapons used were batons or staves an ell long. Women, priests, men above sixty, and lame and blind per. sons might appear by champions. Though long fallen into desuetude, it was a valid and legal mode of trial in England down to 1818, and was then abolished in consequence of the defendant in a suit having demanded this mode of arbitrament, and its being found that it could not legally be denied him. Battel (bat'tel), n. 10. E bat, increase, and dæl, portion.) 1. An account of the expenses of a student at Oxford. -2. pl. I'rovisions taken by Oxford students from the buttery; and also the charges thereon. 2 In Eton College, a small allowance of food which, in addition to the college allowance, the collegers receive from their dames. Richardson. Battel (bat'tel), v.i. (In third meaning perhaps a form of batten (which seo).] 1. To stand indebted in the college books at Oxforil for provisions and drink from the buttery. 2. To reside at the university; to keep terms. 3.1 To grow fat Spenser. Battelt (bat'tel)

[graphic]

BATTEN

, v.i. To render fertile; to batten. Battelt (bat'tel), a. (Perhaps for batful; in any case connected with vatten.) Fertile; fruitful. A battel soil for grain, for pasture good.' Fairfax. Batteller, Battler (bat'tel-ér, bat'l-ė), 1. 1. A student at Oxford indebted in the college books for provisions and drink at the buttery.-2. One who keeps terms or resides at the university Battement (bat'ment), n. {Fr.) A beating; striking; impulse. Batten (bat'n), v. t. (Icel. batna, to grow better, Goth. gabatnan, to avail, to profit, from root bat, bet in better (which see)

, O. E.

about 3 inches thick, nailed to the beams Batter-rule, Battering-rule (bat'te of the ship, instead of cleats, to sling the bat'tér-ing-röl), n. A plumb-line sc seamen's hammocks to.-3. In weaving, the trived that while the plummet hangs beam for striking the weft home; a lathe. cally, the wall to which it is applied Batten (bat'n), v.t. To form or fasten with be sloping or battered. It consists battens. - To batten down, to fasten down plumb-line attached to a triangular f with battens, as the hatches of a ship during one side of which is fixed at the rec a storm.

angle with the line. He had the port-holes of his cabin battened down, Battery (bat'tér-i), n. [Fr. batterie,

Thackeray. battre, to beat. See BATTER.) 1.7 T Battening (bat'n-ing), n. 1. The operation of battering; attack or assault, wit of fixing battens to walls for nailing laths view of beating down, as by batterin to. -2. Battens fixed to a wall, to which the or ordnance. laths for plaster are fixed.

At one place above the rest, by continual Batter (bat'tėr), v.t. [Fr. battre, It. battere, there was such a breach as the towne lay og to beat, to strike, to batter, from L.L. batere, naked to the enemie.

Hol a form of L. batuere, to beat, whence also

2. The instrument or agency emplo: battle.] 1. To beat with successive blows;

battering or attacking; as, a battery of to beat with violence, so as to bruise or

a battery of abuse. Specifically-3. dent; to attack as by a battering-ram or

a body of cannon for field operatior heavy ordnance, with the view of shattering

sisting generally of from four to eigh or demolishing; to cannonade.

(in the British service usually six) Now were the walls beaten with the rams, and

complement of waggons, artilleryme many parts thereof shaken and battered. Holland.

4. The personnel or complement of 2. To wear or impair, as by beating, long and men attached to such a battery. service, or the like; as, a battered paveinent; fort. a parapet thrown up to cover th & battered jade.

ners and others employed about ther The Tory party, according to those perverted the enemy's shot, with the guns em views of Toryism unhappily too long prevalent in Cross batteries, two batteries whic this country, was held to be literally defunct, except

athwart each other, forming an angl

Disraeli. by a few old battered crones of office.

the object battered.-En-écharpe bat 3. In forging, to spread metal outwardly by

battery which plays obliquely on the e hammering on the end. E. H. Knight.

lines. — Enfilade battery, a battery 4. (From noun batter.) To paste together

scours or sweeps the whole line or le with batter or other adhesive matter.

En-revers battery, one which plays up [Scotch.)

enemy's back.- Floating batteries, ba Batter (bat'tèr), v.i. 1. To make attacks, as

erected either on simple rafts, or by a battering-ram or ordnance.

hulls of ships, for the defence of the Besiegers break ground at a safe distance, and or for the bombardment of the e advance gradually till near enough to batter:

Abp. Whately. ports.-6. In law, the unlawful bea -To batter at, to make attacks upon; to

another. The least degree of viole try to overthrow or destroy.

even the touching of another in ange

Slak.
The tyrant has not battered at their peace.

stitutes a battery.-7. In elect. a nur

coated jars placed in such a manne 2. To incline from the perpendicular: said

they may be charged at the same tin of a wall whose face recedes as it rises: op

discharged in the same manner. --G posed to overhang.

battery, a pile or series of plates of Retaining and breast walls batter towards the bank. and zinc, or of any substances suscep E. H. Knight.

See under GALVAN Batter (bat'tèr), n. [See BATTER, v.t.] 1. A Battery-gun (bat'tėr-i-gun), n.

galvanic action. mixture of several ingredients, as flour,

gun which can fire a number of she eggs, salt, &c., beaten together with some

secutively or simultaneously withou liquor, used in cookery. -2. The leaning

ping to reload; a gun with several back of the upper part of the face of a wall,

or with one barrel and several ch as in wharf walls and retaining walls to

like a revolver pistol, such as the support embankments.-3. A glutinous sub

gun or the mitrailleuse. stance used for producing adhesion ; paste. Battil, 1 Battill (battibet. (See [Scotch.)

fat; to render Batter (bat'ėr), , In cricket, the man who

to batten. wields the bat; the batsman.

Ashes are marvellous improvements to (The bowler) bowls a ball almost wide to the off; the batter steps out, and cuts it beautifully to where cover-point is standing,

T. Hughes. Battil, Battill (bat'til), v.i. To becc Batterer (hat'tér-ér), n. One who batters

Sleep, they said, would make her battill or beats. 'Batterers or demolishers of stately and elegant buildings.' Jer. Taylor. Batting (bat'ing), n. 1. The manage Battering-gun (bat'tėr-ing-gun), n. Milit. a bat at play; as, the batting of the

a cannon of heavy calibre adapted for de was excellent.-2. Cotton or wool in molishing defensive works.

prepared for quilts or bed-covers. Battering-ram (bat'tėr-ing-ram), n. 1. In Battish (bat'ish), a. (From bat, the milit, antiq, an engine used to beat down Of or pertaining to or resembling a the walls of besieged places, consisting of a She clasp'd his limbs, by impious labour large beam, with a head of iron somewhat With baitish limbs. resembling the head of a ram, whence its

Battle (batl), n. [Fr. bataille, a bat name. In its simplest form it was carried and forcibly driven against the wall by the

formerly also, a division of an army, hands of the soldiers, but more commonly

battalia, battualia, the fighting and

exercises of soldiers and gladiato: it was suspended by ropes to a beam which was supported by posts, and balanced so as

batuere, to beat, to strike, to fenc to swing backward and forward, being in

fight or encounter between enemi this way impelled against the wall with

posing armies; an engagement; much more ease and effect. It was also

applied to armies or large bodies but applicable also to a combat individuals, whether men or infer mals.—2. Á body of forces, or divis army; a battalion.

The king divided his army into thro whereof the vanguard only with wings can 3. More specifically, (a) the main o body of the army or fleet, as disti from the van and rear.

Angus led the avant-guard, himself foll the battle a good distance behind, and the arrier.

Sir FH The centre, or battle as it was called, cc

sixty-three galleys, was led by John of Au Battering-ram.

(b) That portion of the army, often mounted on wheels and worked under placed and of whatever consisting, cover, the assailants being protected by a as of main importance. kind of shed.—2. A heavy blacksmith's ham The cavalry, by way of distinction, was mer, suspended, and worked horizontally. battle, and on it alone depended the fa Battering-train (bat'tér-ing-trān), n. Milit.

action. a train of heavy ordnance for siege opera 4. An army prepared for or en tions.

fight. "Heralds 'twixt two dread ch, chain; ch, Sc. loch; 8, go; j, job; În, Fr. ton;

ng, sing; TH, then;

ren land.

bot, increase, bete, to make better.] 1. To
fatten; to make fat; to make plump by plen-
teous feeding. 'Battening our flocks with
the fresh dews of night.' Milton.-2. To
fertilize or enrich land.
Batten (bat'n), v.i. To grow or become fat:
to live in luxury, or to grow fat in ease and
luxury. "To feed and batten on this moor.'
Shak.

Her savage birds
O'er human carcasses do scream and batten.

Baillic
Thou battenest by the greasy gleam

In haunts of hungry sinners. Tennyson.
Batten (bat'n), n (Fr. bâton, a stick.] 1. A
piece of wood from 1 inch to 7 inches broad,
and from in. to 24 in. thick. The bat-
tens of commerce are 7 in. broad and 2in
thick; split into two boards each 1 in.
thick, they are used for flooring; and split
into three, for putting on roofs below states,
wainscot, and as uprights for lathing. The
best battens come from Norway.--2. Naut.
one of several thin pieces of oak or fir, nailed
to the mast-head, and to the midship post
of the yard. -Battens of the hatches, scant-
lings of wood or straitened hoops of casks,
applied to confine the edges of the tarpaul-
ings close down to the sides of the hatch-
ways, to prevent the entrance of water in a
stoim. --Tracing battens, pieces of wood
oil, pound; ü, Sc abune; y, Sc. tey.

[graphic]

BAY

BATTLEMENTED

231

BAY

ness.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

are often pannelled or pierced with circles, composed of silk interwoven with threads Bawdt (bąd), v.i. To provide women for trefoils, &c. of gold.

lewd purposes; to act as procuress. Battlemented (bat'i-ment-ed),a. Furnished | Baudelairet (bəd'e-lār), n. [Probably from Leucippe is agent for the king's lust, and band's with battlements; strengthened by battle L.L. balteus, a belt; comp. baudricke, bald ... for the whole court.

Spectator. ments.

rick.) A knife or dagger carried in the Bawdt (bad), v.t. Same as Baud. The walls of Babylon so broad that six cha. girdle.

Bawd (bad), n. A hare. [Provincial English riots could well drive together at the top, and so bat. Bauderie, t Baudrie,t n. Bawdry Chaucer. and Scotch.) In the extract there is a play tlemented that they could not fall. Sir T. Herbert. Baudricket Bauldricket (bad'rik, bąld'. on bawd in this sense and bawd in that Battle-piece (bat' l-pēs), n. A painting rik), n. (See BALDRICK.) A baldrick. Spenser. given above. which represents a battle, exhibiting large Baudrons (bąd'rönz), 11. (Perhaps connected

A bawd, a bawd! so ho I-What hast thou found? masses of men in action. with bawd, a hare.) Puss; a cat. [Scotch.) No hare, sir.

Shak. Battler, n. See BATTELLER. Bauge (baj), n. (After Bauge, a town in

Bawd-born (bądborn), a. Born of a bawa; Battle-song (bat'l-song), n. A song sung Maine-et-Loire, France, where it was manu.

a bawd from birth. Shak. on the battlefield; & martial song.

"The
factured.) A drugget fabricated of thread

Bawdily (ba'di-li), adv. In a bawdy manner; chivalrous battle-song that she warbled spun thick, and of coarse wool.

obscenely; lewdly. alone in her joy.' Tennyson. Bauhinia (ba-hin'i-a), n. (Named in honour

Bawdiness (ba'di-nes), n. Obscenity; lewdBattle-writhen (bat'?-rith-en), a. Twisted of John and Caspar Bauhin, botanists of the or distorted by stress of battle. His battle sixteenth century, because the leaves gener. Bawdrick (bąd'rik), n. [See BALDRICK.) writhen arms and mighty hands.' Tennyson. ally consist of two lobes or parts, which were

1. A belt; a baldrick. Battologist (bat-tol'o-jist), n. (See BAT thought symbolic of the two brothers.) A

The youths' gilt swords were at their thighs, with TOLOGY.] One that talks idly; one that genus of plants, nat, order Leguminosa. The

silver bawdricks bound.

Chapman. needlessly repeats the same thing in speak. species are usually twining plants, found in

2. A cord or thong for the clapper of a bell, the woods of hot countries, and often stretching or writing. 'A truly dull battologist.' Whitlock. ing from tree to tree like living cables. Many Bawdry (bad'ri), n. [See BAWD.) 1. The

practice of procúring women for the gratiBattologize (bat-tol'o-jīz), v.t.

of the species are showy and interesting. The
To repeat
dried leaves and young buds of B. tomen-

Hcation of sust. -2. Obscenity; filthy, lewd needlessly the same thing; to iterate. Sir

language; smuttiness. T. Herbert.

tosa are prescribed in India for dysentery.
The bark of B. variegata is used in tanning;

It is most certain that barefaced bawdry is the Battology (bat-tol'o-ji), n. (Gr. battologia,

Dryden.

poorest pretence to wít imaginable. that of B. racemosa in making ropes; and from battos, a stammerer, and logos, discourse.) Idle talk or babbling; a needless the old wood of the former species is a kind 3. Illicit intercourse; fornication, We repetition of words in speaking. . That of ebony.

[graphic]

turtour (whence Bayonne); (3) the Teutonic Bay (ba), v.t. 1. To bark

barking ca in G. biegen, Goth. biugan, A. Sax.

I had rather be a dog an lupta, dou, to bend.) 1. A recess in the

Than such a Roman, Nesre of a sea or Jake, differing from a creek

Fig.

For we ar is not being so long and narrow; the expunse of water between two capes or head

And bay'd about with many 13de; a gull . -2. An anchorage or road

2. To drive or pursue so sess for ships: a port; a harbour. 'Abay

stand at bay; to chase or ! e mode for ships. Cotgrave. "Port le Blanc,

the bear with hounds of 1 day in Brittany.' Shak.

3. To express by barking. Go to the lay and disembark my coffers. Shak.

'Tis sweet to hear the watch3d pond-head or a pond formed by a dam Bay deep-mouthed welcome a for the purpose of driving mill-wheels.4. principal compartment or division in Baya (ba'ya), n. [Hind. ] the architectural arrangement of a building, (Ploceus philippinus), a ve marted either by the buttresses or pilasters

Indian passerine bird, sra the walls, by the disposition of the main

bullfinch, remarkable i riis of the vaulting of the interior, by the

curious Dest. This reser zin arches and pillars, the principals of

is suspended from the bthe roof, or by any other leading features

that neither apes, serpen that separate it into corresponding portions.

rels can reach it. The ex Oxford Glosary. (The analogy that origin.

is from beneath, and ther ated this use of the word was probably sug.

one for the male, the oti rested by the resemblance of buttresses or

The baya is easily tamed the other divisional features mentioned, to

carry at command. the

capes that mark off a bay in the sea.) Bayadeer, Bayadere () In this sense of a somewhat more extended bailadeirá, from bailar, opa, the word has a great many specific sig.

East Indies, a regular da nifications; as, (a) in arch. the part of a

tute. window included between the mullions; a Bayal (bā'al), n. A fine ! das; a light . (b) In bridge-building, the por

monds. tion between two piers. (c) In carp. a por. Bayamo (bä-ya'mā), n. tion of a compound or framed floor included

wind accompanied by v between two girders , or between a girdering from the land on

Cuba, and especially fro tween two binding-joists, or between two уато. . pinders in a framed floor. - A bay of roofing, Bay-antler (bā'ant-le

branch of a stag's ant

See ANTLER. urining, the space between two frames in a Bayard + (bā'ard), n. O

a bay-horse — bay, and see). Many examples word seem to contain a ticular horse of this na romances of chivalry.)

and the wall.– A bay of joists, the joists be

must be married or we must live in bawdry.' heedless battology of multiplying words.' Bauk (bak), n. Scotch form of Balk (which Shak.-4. Bawds collectively. Udall. Milton. "Mere surplusage or dattology." Bauia (bald), a. Bold. "Ferguson the bauld

Bawdship (bąd'ship), n. The office of a Prynne.

bawd. Ford. Batton (bat'n), n. Same as Batten.

and slie. Burns. (Scotch.)

Bawdy (ba'di), a. (From bawd.) Obscene;
Battont (bat'on), n. A baton or club. Baulea (bą' lē-a), n. A round-bottomed lewd; indecent; smutty; unchaste.
Spenser.

passenger-boat used on the shallower parts Bawdy-house (ba'di-hous), n. A house of Battril (bat'ril), n. See BATLET.

of the Ganges, having a mast and sail, but lewdness and prostitution; a house of illBattue (bat-ti), n. {Fr., from battre, to generally propelled by oars.

fame kept for the resort and unlawful combeat.] 1. A method of killing game by hay. Baulite (balīt), n. (After Baula, a moun merce of lewd persons of both sexes, ing persons to beat a wood, copse, or other tain in Iceland.) A white transparent Bawhorse (ba'hors), n. Bathorse (which cover, with loud cries, and so drive the mineral, in very thin splinters, found in see) animals forwards toward a number of sports

the matter ejected by Krabla, in Iceland. Bawk, Bawlk (bak), n. Balk (which see). men stationed to shoot them.--2. The game

It is a variety of glassy felspar, and melts Bawl (bal), v.i. (Probably an imitative word; turned out by the beaters.

before the blowpipe into a clear glass. comp. waul, caterwaul, Icel. baula, to low; Batty (bat'i), a. (From bat, an animal.) Be Baulk (bąk), n. Same as Balk (which see). Sw. böla, A. Sax. bellan, to bark; L. balo, to

Batty Bauxite (bős'it), n. A clay found at Baux, bleat.) To cry out with a loud full sound; longing to or resembling a bat. Shak.

near Arles. It contains about one-third of wings.

to make vehement or clamorous outeries, Batz (bäts), n. (G., a bear.)

its weight of alumina, with silica, iron, and as in pain, exultation, demand, and the

water. The alumínium is extracted at New. like; to shout. A small copper coin with a mixture of silver, bearcastle by a complicated process which does They bawl for freedom in their seriseless mood.

Milton ing the image of a bear,

not remove the iron and silicon. formerly current in some

Bavarettet (bav-a-ret), n. (Fr., dim. of Bawl (bal), v.t. To proclaim by outery; to parts of Germany and bavette, a bib, from bave, It. bava, the saliva

shout out. Switzerland, value ifd.

which runs involuntarily from the mouth of Still must I heart shall hoarse Fitzgerald bawl

an infant.) A bib to put before the bosom His creaking couplets in a tavern hall ? Byron. Baubee, n. See BAWBEE. Bauble (ba'bl), n. [O.E. of a child.

Bawl (bal), n. A vehement clamour; an babil, babulle, babel, &c.,

Bavarian (ba-vā'ri-an), n. A native or in outcry; as, the children set up a loud bawl. 0. Fr. babole, baboulet, Fr. habitant of Bavaria.

Bawler (bal'ér), n. One who bawls. babiole,a toyor baby-thing;

Bavarian (ba-vā'ri-an), a. Of or pertaining Bawn (ban), n. [Ir. and Gael, babhun (pron. from same Celtic root as to Bavaria.

bawn), an inclosure, a fortress.] 1. Originbabe.] 1. A short stick

Bavaroy + (bav'a-roi), n. (Fr. Bavarois, ally an earth work strengthened with stakes with a fool's head, freBavarian.) A kind of cloak or surtout.

surrounding a castle or house in Ireland; quently ornamented with

Let the loop'd bavaroy the fop embrace. Gay. hence, any similar inclosed place, whether asses ears fantastically

designed as a fortification or as an inclosure Bavian,+ (ba'vi-an), n. Same as Babian. carved on it, anciently

for cattle.-2. A large house, including all Bavin (bav'in), n. (Prov. E. bavin, baven, carried by the fools at

its appurtenances, as offices, court-yard, connected by Wedgwood with 0. Fr. baffe, a tached to great houses. It Fool's Bauble.

&c. Swift. (Irish. } frequently had at

faggot.) A faggot of brushwood; light and the

Bawn (ban), v. t. (See the noun.) In Ireland, combustible wood used for lighting fires. other end a Happer with which they used to

to surround or inclose with a bawn.
affect to belabour people.
Mounted on a hazel bavin.' Hudibras.

Bawrelt (barrel), n. A kind of hawk.
The kynges foole
The bavin, though it burne bright, is but a blaze. Bawsin, Bawson (ba'sn), n. (O. Fr. bauzan,

Lyly.
Sate by the fire upon a stoole,

bauçant, Pr. bausan, It. balzano, marked Bavin (bav'in), a. Resembling bavin. "Rash,

Gotver. As he that with his bauble plaide.

with white, striped with white: said anibavin wits, soon kindled and soon burnt.' 2. A trifling piece of finery; that which is

mals, especially horses; 0. E. and Sc, bauShak.

soned, having a white streak down the face. gay or showy without real value; a gewgaw; Bavin (bav'in), v.t. To make up into fag.

derived by Diez from It. balza, border, strip a trifle. gots.

of trimming, from L. balteus, a belt.) A Walpole is constantly showing us things. not of Kid or bavin them, and pitch them upon their ends very great value indeed, yet things which we are

badger, from the streaks of white on his to preserve them from rotting.

Evelyn. pleased to see and which we can see nowhere else.

face. His mittens were of bawson's skin They are baubles; but they are made curiosities Bawbee, Baubee (ba-bē'), n. (Fr. bas-billon, Drayton. either by his grotesque workmanship or by some the worst kind of billon“-bas, low, and bil. Bawsin-faced, Bawson - faced (ba'snassociation belonging to them. Macaulay.

lon, brass coinage alloyed or rather washed fäst), a. [See 'BAWSIN.] Having a white Baublet (ba'bl), a. Trifling; insignificant. with a little silver. Popularly referred to spot on the forehead or face, as a horse, contemptible.

Sc. babie, an infant, because the coin was cow, &c.
The sea being smooth,

said to bear the impress of James VI. when Baxter (bak'stér), n. A baker, properly a How many shallow, bauble boats dare sail

a child; but the name as well as the coin female baker. (Old English and scotch.} Upon her patient breast.

Shak.

was in existence before his time.) A half See BAKESTER. Baubling, ! (ba'bl-ing), a. Contemptible. penny. In the pl. money; cash. [Scotch.] Baxterian (baks-té'ri-an), a. Pertaining to A baubling vessel was he captain of. Bawble (ba'bl), n. Same as Bauble.

Richard Baxter, a celebrated English divine; Shak.

Bawblingi (ba'bl-ing), a. Same as Baubling. as, the Baxterian scheme of doctrine. Baudt (bąd), v.t. (W. bawaidd, dirty, mean, Bawcock (ba' kok), n. (Either from Fr. Bay (bá), a. (Fr. bai, L. badius, brown, vile.) To foul or dirty.

beau, fine, beautiful, and cock, or, more pro chestnut-coloured; hence bayard, baizr 1 Her shoone smeared with tallow,

bably, from 0. Fr. baud, bold, wanton, and Red or reddish, inclining to a chestnut Greased uponi dyrt

cock.) A fine fellow. How now, my baw. That baudoth her skyrt.

colour: applied to the colour of horses.
Skelton.
cock?' Shak.

The shades of this colour are light bay, dark
Baude, a. (O. Fr., a word adopted by the Bawd (bad), n. (Probably from 0.E. baude, bay, dappled bay, gilded bay, chestnut bay.

French from the Teutonic, and then pass merry, wanton; 0. Fr, baud, bold, wanton Bay (ba), n. (Fr. baie, It. baja, Sp. Pg. bahia, ing into English; really a form of bold.] (see BAUDE); or from W. baw, Alth, bawaidd, and L L baia, a bay. Of doubtful origin, Joyous; riotously joyous. Chaucer.

Althy.) A procurer or procuress; a person several etymologies being proposed, such Baudekin, Baudkin (bad'e-kin, bad'kin), n. who keeps a house of prostitution, and con as, (I) It. badare, Catalan badar, to open [0. Fr. baudequin. See BALDACHINO.}" A ducts criminal intrigues; now usually ap. the mouth, to gape, whence badia, a bay, sumptuous species of cloth for garments plied only to females.

which might become bahia, like Fr. trahir, used by the nobility of the middle ages, and He (Pandarus) is named Troilus' Aawd. Skelton, It. tradire; (2) a Basque word baia, baiyo, a Fāte, far, fat, fall; mē, met, hér; pine, pin; note, not, move; tube, tub, ball; oil, pound; ú, Sc. abune; y, Sc, ley.

Satin

wax.

the small rafters and their supporting purlins between two principal rafters. (d) In gallery. (c) Naul. that part of a ship on each side between decks which lies between the bitts ; the foremost messing-place between decks in a ship-of-war. -Sick bay, a portion of the fore-part of the main-deck

a horse generally. reserred for the sick and wounded. () In

the mill. Philips plestering, the space between two screeds.

bayard. Proverbial s Ste SCREED. Bay (ha), n. A kind of mahogany obtained Bayardt (bāärd), n. from Campeachy Bay

gaper, from bayer, to

gapes or gazes earnest Bay (ba),

n. [Fr. baie, L. bacca, a berry.]
21 A berry
, especially of the laurel-tree.

mannerly beholder; a :

a clown. The bays or berries that it beareth.' Hol

This he presumes to do, bond. - The laurel-tree, noble laurel, or

had the soul to know wh Pweet bay (Laurus nobilis). (See LAUREL)

as his provender and the The term day is given also to a pumber of schooled his conceptions. trees and shrubs more or less resembling the Bayardlyt (bā'ard-li), Limbilia

that gapes.) Blind; Thave seen the wicked in great power, and spread ) dulity, a bayardly coi ing himsel like a green bay tree.

Ps. xxxvii. 35.

ous insolence.' Jer. 1. An honorary garland or crown bestowed Bayberry (bā'be-ri)," as a prize for victory

or excellence, an of the bay-tree or L ciently made or consisting of branches of fruit of Myrica cer the laurel; bence, fame or renown due to Myrica cerifera (wi achievement or merit; in this sense used

tallow, a substance o chiefly in the plural.

berry or wax-myrtle
I play'd to please myself, on rustick reed,
Nor sought for bay, the learned shepherd's meed. Bay-bolt (bábõlt), n.

W. Bromune.
Reneath his reign shall Eusden wear the bays.

shank. E. H. Knig Pope.

Bayet (bā), v.t. (Se Bay (vá), r. (Probably a short form of 0. Fr.

He feeds upon the c abai abbai, a barking, whence abbayer, to

His sweatie forehea hark; Mod. Fr. aboi, a barking, aux abois, at Bayed (bād), a. Ha bay, when the stag reduced to extremities tums and faces the dogs that stand barking

* The large-bayed bs in front of him; either from L. baubari, to

Bayonet (baou-et), bark, and prefix a, ab, for L. ad, to, or as

bayonnette, It. baio Wedgwood thinks from ba, a syllable natur

ally derived from ally representing the sound made in opening the mouth, whence Fr. bayer, to gape, of stand gaping; It. badare, to stand gazing, stare a bada, to stand watching.] 2. The bark of a dog; especially, a deep-toned bark. . The state of being so hard pressed by enemies as to be compelled to turn round and thus, a stag is at bay when he stands facing

1, Common Baye cause bayonets ar

made there. The The state of being kept off by the bold

Dryden. 1571 at least, but attitude of an opponent; the state of being

ginally applied t

from the modern prevented by an enemy, or by any kind of resistance, from making further advance.

the word Bayonne of small flat poc knives; or a gr

girdle, like a dag Swift.

bayonnier, whicl balestier. The lat as the weapon? which bayonnet Probably the de

Bayonne is error Dryden. sword or dagger,

face them from impossibility of escape;

the dogs.

Nor light was left, nor hopes to force his way;
Emboldened by despair, he stood at bay,

We have now, for ten years together, turned the
whole force and expense of the war where the enemy
was best able to hold us at bay.
Bay (bá), 1.4 10. Fr. abbayer, Mod. Fr. aboyer,

A bajare, abbajare, to bark. See the noun.)
To bark, as a dog at his game; especially,
w bark with a deep sound.

The bounds at nearer distance boarsely baycd.

BAY

BAY

235

n

A bay

3 Bawdt (bad), v.i. To provide women for lewd

purposes; to act as procuress.

Leucippe is agent for the king's last, and bands 1. ... for the whole court.

Spedator e Bawdt (bad), v.t. Same as Baud.

Bawd (bad), 1. A hare. (Provincial English and Scotch.] In the extract there is a play on bawd in this sense and bawd in that given above.

A bawd, a band! so bol-What hast thou found! No kare, sir,

Shak. Bawd-born (badborn).Q. Born of a bawd;

a bawd from birth. Shak. Bawdily (ba'di-li), adv. In a bawdy manner;

obscenely; lewdly. ir Bawdiness (ba'di-nes), 1. Obscenity; lewd

ness. " Bawdrick (bad'rik), n. [See BALDRICK.) re

1 A belt; a baldrick. А

The youths' gilt swords were at their thighs, with

silver bazvdricks bound. Chapman. 2. A cord or thong for the clapper of a bell. h

Bawdry (bəd'ri), n. (See BAWD.! 1. The бу

practice of procuring women for the gratification of lust. -2. Obscenity; filthy, lewd

1.

[ocr errors]

le

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Id

language; smuttiness.

It is most certain that barefaced bandry is the poorest pretence to wit imaginable. Drygon. . 3. Iicit intercourse; fornication. “We

must be married or we must live in bawdry.' ch Shak.4. Bawds collectively. Udall

. Bawdship (bąd'ship), 1. The office of a

bawd. Ford.

Bawdy (ba'di), a. (From bared.) Obscene; ed lewd; indecent; smutty; unchaste. ts Bawdy-house (ba'di-bous), n. A house of

harbour (whence Bayonne); (3) the Teutonic Bay (bā), v.t. 1. Tu bark at; to follow stem in G. biegen, Goth. biugan, A. Sax. barking beogan, E. bou, to bend.) 1. A recess in the

I had rather be a dog and buy the mod

Than such a Roman. shore of a sea or lake, differing from a creek in not being so long and narrow; the ex

Fig.

For we are at the stake panse of water between two capes or head

And bay'd about with many enemies. lands; a gulf. — 2. An anchorage or road

2. To drive or pursue so as to com stead for ships; a port; a harbour.

stand at bay; to chase or hunt. “They or rode for ships.' Cotgrave. Port le Blanc,

the bear with hounds of Sparta.' $ a bay in Brittany.' Shak.

3. To express by barking. Go to the bay and disenibark my coffers. Shak.

'Tis sweet to hear the watch-dog's honest ba 3. A pond-head or a pond formed by a dam Bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw nea for the purpose of driving mill-wheels.4. A principal compartment or division in Baya (bā'ya), n. [Hind.] The weave the architectural arrangement of a building,

[graphic]

1

lewdness and prostitution; a house of ill-
fame kept for the resort and unlawful com-

merce of lewd persons of both sexes.
nt Bawhorse (ba'hors), m. Bathorse (which
in

see) d. Bawk, Bawlk (bak), n. Balk (which see) ts Bawl (bal), v.i. (Probabiy an imitative word;

comp. waul, caterwaul, Icel. baula, to low;

Sw. böla, A. Sax bellan, to bark; I balo, to r.

bleat.) To cry out with a loud full sound; f

to make vehement or clamorous outcries,
as in pain, exultation, demand, and the

like; to shout.
es They hawl for freedom in their senseless wood.

Milton f

Bawl (bal), v.1. To proclaim by outcry; to

sbout out. f

Still must I hear! shall hoarse Fitzgerald bawl

His creaking couplets in a tavern hall! Byran. .
Bawl (bal), 16. A vehement clamour; an

outcry; as, the children set up a loud bawl.
Bawler (bal'er), n. One who bawls.
Bawn (ban), n. (Ir. and Gael

. babhun (pron.
bawn), an inclosure, a fortress.] 1. Origin-
ally an earthwork strengthened with stakes
surrounding a castle or house in Ireland;
hence, any similar inclosed place, whether
designed as a fortification or as an inclosure
for cattle.-2. A large house, including all
its appurtenances, as offices, court-yard,

(Ploceus philippinus), a very interestir marked either by the buttresses or pilasters

İndian passerine bird, somewhat lil on the walls, by the disposition of the main

bullfinch, remarkable for its ext; ribs of the vaulting of the interior, by the

curious nest. This resembles a bott main arches and pillars, the principals of

is suspended from the branch of a t the roof, or by any other leading features

that neither apes, serpents, nor even that separate it into corresponding portions.

rels can reach it. The entrance, moi Oxford Glossary. (The analogy that origin

is from beneath, and there are two cha ated this use of the word was probably sug

one for the male, the other for the E gested by the resemblance of buttresses or

T'he baya is easily tamed, and will fet the other divisional features mentioned, to carry at command. the capes that mark off a bay in the sea.) Bayadeer, Bayadere (bā-ya-dêr), » In this sense, or a somewhat more extended bailadeirá, from bailar, to dance.] one, the word has a great many specific sig

East Indies, a regular dancing girl; a

tute.
nifications; as, (a) in arch. the part of a
window included between the mullions; a

Bayal (bā'al), n. A fine kind of cotton day; a light. (6) In bridge-building, the por

monds. tion between two piers. (c) In carp. a por

Bayamo (bä-yä'mo), n. A violent b tion of a compound or framed floor included

wind accompanied by vivid lightning between two girders, or between a girder

ing from the land on the south c and the wall. - A bay of joists, the joists be

Cuba, and especially from the Bight tween two binding-joists, or between two

yamo.

The girders in a framed floor.–A bay of roofing, Bay-antler (bā'ant-ler), n. the small rafters and their supporting pur

branch of a stag's antler; the bezlins between two principal rafters. (d) In

See ANTLER. mining, the space between two frames in a Bayard + (bā'ärd), n. (O.Fr. bayart, gallery. (e) Naut. that part of a ship on

a bay-horse - bay, and suffix -ard each side between decks which lies between see). Many examples of the use the bitts; the foremost messing-place be

word seem to contain a reference to tween decks in a ship-of-war.-Sick bay, a

ticular horse of this name celebrated portion of the fore-part of the main-deck

romances of chivalry.) A bay-horse reserved for the sick and wounded. (f) In

a horse generally. Blind bayard plastering, the space between two screeds.

the mill. Philips. Who so bold a See SCREED.

bayard.' Proverbial saying. Bay (bā), n.

A kind of mahogany obtained Bayardt (bā'ärd), n. (O. Fr, bayc from Campeachy Bay,

gaper, from bayer, to gape.] A ma Bay (bā), 1. [Fr. baie, L. bacca, a berry.)

gapes or gazes earnestly at a thing; 1. A berry, especially of the laurel-tree,

mannerly beholder; a stupid, doltish * The bays or berries that it beareth.' Hol

a clown. land.-2. The laurel-tree, noble laurel, or

This he presumes to do, being a bayard, w

had the soul to know what conversing, me sweet bay (Laurus nobilis). (See LAUREL.) as his provender and the familiarity of his The term bay is given also to a number of schooled his conceptions, trees and shrubs more or less resembling the Bayardly (bå'ärd-li), a. (See BAYA L. nobilis.

that gapes. ) Blind; stupid. “A bli I have seen the wicked in great power, and spread dulity, a bayardly confidence, or an ing himself like a green bay tree.

Ps. xxxvii. 35. ous insolence.' Jer. Taylor. 3. An honorary garland or crown bestowed | Bayberry (bā'be-ri), n. In bot. (a) ti as a prize for victory or excellence, an of the bay-tree or Laurus nobilis, ciently made or consisting of branches of fruit of Myrica cerifera, (C) The the laurel; hence, fame or renown due to Myrica cerifera (wax-myrtle). - Be achievement or merit: in this sense used tallow, a substance obtained from t chiefly in the plural.

berry or wax-myrtle. Called also
I play'd to please myself, on rustick reed,
Nor sought for bay, the learned shepherd's meed. Bay-bolt (bābõlt), n. A bolt with a

W. Browne. shank. E. H. Knight.
Beneath his reign shall Eusden wear the bays.

Pope.

Bayet (bā), v.t. (See BATHE.) To b Bay (bā), n. [Probably a short form of 0. Fr. He feeds upon the cooling shade, and be

His sweatie forehead on the breathing v abai, abbai, a barking, whence abbayer, to

S bark; Mod. Fr. aboi, a barking, aux abois, at Bayed (bād), a. Having bays, as a b bay, when the stag reduced to extremities turns and faces the dogs that stand parking Bayonet (ba'on.et), n. [Fr. baionnett

The large-bayed barn. Drayton. in front of him ; either from L, baubari, to bark, and prefix a, ab, for L. ad, to, or as

bayonnetie, It. baionetta, Sp. bayone

ally derived from Bayonne in Fran Wedgwood thinks from ba, a syllable naturally representing the sound made in opening

1 the mouth, whence Fr. bayer, to gape, or

5 stand gaping; It. badare, to stand gazing, stare a bada, to stand watching. ] 1. The bark of a dog; especially, a deep-toned bark.2. The state of being so hard pressed by enemies as to be compelled to turn round and face them from impossibility of escape; 1, Common Bayonet. 2, Sword Bayo thus, a stag is at bay when he stands facing the dogs.

cause bayonets are said to have be Nor flight was left, nor hopes to force his way; made there. The word occurs as Emboldened by despair, he stood at bay.

Dryden.

1571 at least, but it seems to have 3. The state of being kept off by the bold

ginally applied to weapons very attitude of an opponent; the state of being

from the modern bayonet. Cotgrav prevented by an enemy, or by any kind of the word Bayonnette, describes it as resistance, from making further advance. of small flat pocket dagger, furnisl We have now, for ten years together, turned the

knives; or a great knife to hang whole force and expense of the war where the enemy girdle, like a dagger;' he also gives t was best able to hold us at bay.

Swift. bayonnier, which he says is the san Bay (bā), v.i. [O. Fr. abbayer, Mod. Fr. aboyer,

balestier. The latter word suggests It. bajare, abbajare, to bark. See the noun.] as the weapon used by the bayor To bark, as a dog at his game; especially,

which bayonnette would be a din to bark with a deep sound.

Probably the derivation from the The hounds at nearer distance hoarsely bayed.

Bayonne is erroneous.) 1. A short tr Dryden. sword or dagger, formerly with a han

1

wax.

&c Swift. (Irish.]
Bawn (ban), v.t. (See the noun.] In Ireland,

to surround or inclose with a bawn.
Bawrelt (barrel), 1. A kind of hawk.
Bawsin, Bawson (ba/sn), n. (O.Fr. bauzan,
bauçant, Pr. bausan, It, balzano, marked
with white, striped with white: said of ani-
mals, especially horses; 0, E. and Sc. bau-
soed, having a white streak down the face,
derived by Diez from It. balza, border, strip
of trimming, from 1. balteus, a belt.) A
badger, from the streaks of white on his
face. His mittens were of dawson's skin.'

Drayton. Bawsin-faced, Bawson-faced (ha'sfäst), a. (See BAWSIN.) Having a white spot on the forehead or face, as a horse, COW, &c. Baxter (bak'stër), n. A baker, properly a female baker. (Old English and Scotch) See BAKESTER. Baxterian (baks-tē'ri-an), a. Pertaining to Richard Baxter, a celebrated English divine; as, the Bazterian scheme of doctrine. Bay (), a. [Fr. bai, L. badius, brown, chestnut-coloured; hence bayard, baize. Red or reddish, inclining to a chestnut colour: applied to the colour of horses. The shades of this colour are light bay, dark bay, dappled bay, gilded bay, chestnut bay. Bay (ba), n. [Fr. baie, It. baja, Sp. Pg. bahia, and L. L. baia, a bay. Of doubtful origin, several etymologies being proposed, such as, (1) It. badare, Catalan badar, to open the mouth, to gape, whence badia, a bay, which might become bahia, like Fr. trahir. It. tradire; (2) a Basque word baia, baiya, a oil, pouud; ü, Sc. abune; }, Sc. fey

cli, chain;

ch, Sc. loch;

8. go;

j, job; , Fr. ton;

ng, sing;

TH, then;

« AnteriorContinuar »