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BAY-YARN

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BEACON

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BEACON

with beads; to raise bead gal That beacons the darkness of heaven.' wapbal

beaded with bubbles.' H. S 2010 (tekn), 0.i. To serve as a beacon Beaded (bēd'ed), a. Like a

Tennyson.

woolly breasts and beaded e tera the distance beacons.

Bead-house (bēd'hous), n. rannage (běkn-aj), n. Money paid for

house.
the maintenance of beacons.
Saou-blaze (bē’ku-bláz), n. A signal

Beading (bēd'ing), n. In a

in imitation of a bead. licht een fire. Tennyson. kecoked (be'knd), Q. Having a beacon. Beadle (bē'dl), n. (A. Sax.

from the A. Sar. beðdan, t De fors that skirts the beaconed hill.' T.

command. See BID.) 1.

crier of a court; a servitor kracon-fire (bë'kn-fir), n. A fire lighted up 2.3 beacon or signal; a signal fire.

persons to appear and answ kemia-tower (bēko-tou-er), n. A tower

an Apparitor or Summoner. evhich a beacon is raised. A beacon

a university whose chief bu freer above the waves.' Tennyson.

with a mace in public proc Stald (bed) , r. (A. Sax. bed, bead, a prayer, from

3. A parish officer whose be Mabes , to pray. Beads are used by Roman

ish petty offenders; a chu Catholics to keep them right as to the num.

various subordinate duties bard their prayers, one bead of their rosary

the clergyman, keeping being dropped every time a prayer is said;

attending meetings of vesta inace the transference of the name from

And I, forsooth in love! I, that h but which is counted (the prayers) to that

A very beadle to a humorous sig which is used to count them. So in Sp. and

A critic, nay, a night-watch con By crenta, conto, a bead, is from contar, to

Beadleism (bē dl-ism), n. toat

. The old phrase to bid one's beads language, &c., of beadles. means to say one's prayers. See BID.) 1.1 A Beadlery (bě dl-ri), n. Tu

diction of a beadle. at understanded or minded on.' Injunc

beadle.
ted ball of gold, pearl, amber, glass, or the
like to be string on a thread, the string

fungus which attacks fri Luas formed being either worn round the

stems consist of single cel er det an ornament, and called a necklace, together, so as to present

strings of beads.

prayer. 'saying over a number of beads, Beadleship (bē’dl-ship), 1 Kasy to the Clergy, 1541.–2. A little perfor- Bead-mould (bēd' mold),

Bay-yarn (bā'yarn), n. Woollen yarn. been; ppr. being. (This is one of the three Sir Pitt has been and proposed for to marry Miss
Bazaar, Bazar (ba-zar), 13. [Per. bazar, a different verbal roots that are required in

Sharp.

Thackeray.
market.] 1. In the East, an exchange, mar the conjugation of the substantive verb, the - Let be, to omit or leave untouched; to let
ket-place, or place where goods are exposed others being am and was. In English, un alone.
for sale, usually consisting of small shops or less in compound tenses, it is now almost

Let be, said he, my prey. Dryden.
stalls in a narrow street or series of streets. confined to the subjunctive, imperative, in-
These bazaar-streets are frequently shaded

[It has been thought better to exhibit the
finitive, and participles, but in Anglo-Saxon,
by a light material laid from roof to roof, Old English, and up even to the time of

uses of the verb in its various forms (am,
and sometimes are arched over. Marts for Milton, it was conjugated in the present

are, is, was, were, &c.) here rather than in the sale of miscellaneous articles, chiefly indicative, singular and plural, nor is the

fragmentary details at each individual

form.)
fancy goods, are now to be found in most present quite obsolete in written English Be- (be), a prefix common to the Teutonic

yet, being also common in the dialects. In
A. Sax. it was in the pres. beo or beom, bist,

languages, the same word as by. It has
bith, pl. beoth; subj. beó, pl. beôn; imper.

various uses. (a) It changes substantives beo, pl. beoth; inf. beon; in later times we

and adjectives into verbs; as, befriend, befind beth and bes in the third person singu

night, becalm, belittle. (b) It changes in

transitive verbs into transitive, sometimes
lar, and ben (sometimes bin) in the plural.
The root be is seen in 0.8ax. bium, O.H.G.

modifying the root-meaning of the simple

verb; as, bespeak, bethink, beseem, bequeath.
pim, G. bin, I am, and is allied to A. Sax.
búan, to dwell, L. fui, I was, futurus, about

(c) It modifies also the root-meaning of cer-
to be, future, Skr, bhú, to be. See AM and

tain transitive verbs; as, behold, beseech, beWas.] 1. To have a real state or existence;

fit. (d) It adds an intensive force to certain to exist in the world of fact, whether phy

transitive verbs, without modifying their

root-meaning; as, bedaub, bepraise, besmear. sical or mental.

(e) It changes the indirect object of the Time was, Time is, and Time shall be no more.

simple verb into the direct, and vice versa ;

Southey.
Tode, or not to be, that is the question. Shak.

thus, I strew the roses on the ground, but I

bestrew the ground with roses; I sprinkle 2. It asserts connection merely between a

water on a dress, but I besprinkle a dress
subject and predicate without necessarily

with water. (f) It is the prefix of certain
involving a predicate in itself: (a) Connec-
tion of identity; as, John is the man. (6) Con.

participles or participial adjectives, which
nection of relation -(1) Between a charac-

have no finite tenses, or whose finite tenses teristic or permanent attribute and a sub

are very rarely used; as, beloved, betroubled, ject; as, John is a man; John is mortal; John

bemused. (9) It enters into the composi.

tion of certain nouns substantive; as, be-
is brave. (2) Between an accidental quality,
state, or condition, and the subject; as, John

hest, behalf, behoof. (h) It changes certain
is hungry; things are so.

nouns into adverbs and prepositions; as,

Be is often thus used, especially in negative sentences, with

because, before, below, beside, besides. (1) It a clause introduced by that for the predi

represents other Anglo-Saxon prefixes; as, cate, in the same sense as is expressed by

believe =A. Sax. gelyfan, G. glauben. (Though such phrases as: it is (not) the case; it is

a pure Anglo-Saxon prefix, it is frequently

conjoined with Romance stems: comp, in (not) because. 'Were it not that I have bad

addition to several of the above, the verbs dreams.' Shak,

becharm, besiege, betray.!
Bazaar in Cairo.

And yet it is not that I bear thee love;
But since that thou canst talk of love so well,

Beach (bēch), n (Origin very doubtful.
Thy company, which erst was irksome to me,

Perbaps Icel. baklei, a bank, the shore, with
European cities bearing the name of bazaars; I will endure

Shak. the k softened into ch. Comp. kirk, church;
and the term has been extended to struc-

birk, birch, &c.) The shore of the sea or of
(3) Connection of place-relation; as, John is
tures arranged as market-places for specific
at home; he was in town yesterday.-3. Used

a lake, which is washed by the tide and
articles; as, a horse-bazaar.–2. A sale of
before a personal noun, or pronoun, or noun

Waves; the strand. It may be sometimes
miscellaneous articles in furtherance of

used for the shore of large rivers. --Raised
some charitable or other purpose; a fancy
personified, with the prepositions to, with,

beaches, in geol, a term applied to those
&c., before the latter, in the sense which
fair. The articles there sold are mostly of
the Latin verb est has before a personal

long terraced level pieces of land, consisting
fancy work, and contributed gratuitously.

of sand and gravel, and containing marine
dative; as, est mihi liber (a book is to me,
Bazaar-maund (ba-zär'mand), ». An old

shells, now, it may be, a considerable dis-
i.e. I have a book); that is, indicating pos-
Indian weight equal to 721 lbs. avoirdupois:

tance above and away from the sea, but
session on the part of the person.
so called in contradistinction to factory-

Half all Cominius' honours are to Marcius. Shak.

bearing sufficient evidences of having been maund. See MAUND.

at one time sea-beaches, In Scotland such
Bazaras (ba-zar'as), n. A large flat-bottomed This mode of speech is, however, most fre a terrace has been traced extensively along
pleasure-boat used on the Ganges, navigated quently employed to express a salutation, the coast of the Western Highlands and
with sails and oars.

wish, or the like. Peace be to the brethren. elsewhere, at 25 feet above the present sea-
Bazat, Baza (baz'at, baz'a), n. A long, fine Eph. vi. 23.-4. In addition to its use as an level.
spun cotton from Jerusalem, whence it is independent verb, be (and its conjugational | Beach (bēch), v.t. To run on a beach; as,
called Jerusalem cotton.

forms) is employed as an auxiliary in form we beached the ship.
Bdellium (del'lí-um), 12. L. bdellium, Gr. ing the tenses of other verbs. It is so used Beach-comber (bēch'kom-er), n. 1. Naut.
bdellion, a plant, a fragrant gum which ex (a) in forming the passive voice of transitive a fellow who prowls about the sea-shore to
udes from it, from Heb. bedolach, a precious verbs; as, he is or has been disturbed. In plunder wrecks, and pick up waifs and strays
article of merchandise mentioned along such passive forms (of modern origin) as is of any kind.-2. A long wave rolling in from
with gold and precious stones (Gen. ii. 12). being written, was being written, which ex the ocean. (American.)
The opinion of the Rabbins, which Bockhart press an uncompleted action, being has the Beached (becht), p. and a. 1. Having a
supports, is that bedolach signifies originally sense of becoming. (6) It is used in forming beach; bordered by a beach; formed by, or
a pearl, and as a collective noun pearls, the perfect and pluperfect tenses of many consisting of, a beach. Upon the beached
which may be compared to grains of manna intransitive verbs expressing a change of verge of the salt flood.' Shak. [Rare.

- hence its secondary sense of a gum.] An place or condition, where the use of this 2. Run on a beach; stranded.
aromatic gum resin brought chiefly from auxiliary instead of have shows that what is Beach-man (bêch'man), n. A person on the
Africa and India, in pieces of different sizes looked to is rather the result of the action coast of Africa who acts as interpreter to
and figures, externally of a dark reddish or process expressed by the verb than the ship-masters, and assists in conducting the
brown, internally clear, and not unlike glue. action or process itself. This mode of con trade.
To the taste it is slightly bitterish and pun struction was formerly much more common Beach-master (bēch'mas-tér), n. Naul, a
gent; its odour is agreeable. In the mouth than it is now, but it is not by any means superior officer with plenary powers, gener-
it becomes soft and sticks to the teeth; on obsolete. Among the verbs so construed ally a captain, appointed to superintend the
a red-hot iron it readily catches flame, and are such as go, come, ride, flee, fly, steal disembarkation of an attacking force. He
burns with a crackling noise. It is used as away, rise, sink, fall, &c.; become, grow, generally leads the storming party.
a perfume and a medicine, being a weak turn, chance, escape, perish, fade, cease, Beachy (bēch'i), a. Having a beach or
deobstruent. Indian bdellium is the pro vanish.

beaches; consisting of a beach or beaches.
duce of Balsamodendron Roxburghii; Afri-

The heathen are perished out of his land (that is, * The beachy girdle of the ocean' Shak.
can, of B. africanum; Egyptian bdellium have perished and now no longer exist in his land). Beacon (bē kn), n. (A. Sax. been, bedcen, a
is obtained from the doum palm (Hyphene

Ps. X. 16.

sign, a beacon, whence beck, beckon. See
thebaica); and Sicilian is produced by Dau-
Sometimes even the perfect and pluperfect

BECK.) An object visible to some dis-
cus gummifer, a species of the genus to of the verb to be are construed with a par-

tance, and serving to notify the presence of
which the carrot belongs.
ticiple of such an intransitive verb.

danger; as a signal-fire to give notice of the
Bdellometer (del-lom'et-ér), n. [Gr. bdelló, The invalid moaned out a feeble complaint

approach of an enemy; a mark or object of
I suck, and metron, a measure.] An instru-
that the girl had been gone an hour. Dickens.

some kind placed conspicuously on a coast
ment proposed as a substitute for the leech, It forms, with the infinitive, a particular or over a rock or shoal at sea for the guid-
consisting of a cupping-glass, to which a future tense, which often expresses duty, ance of vessels; hence, in general, anything
scarificator and exhausting syringe are at necessity, or purpose; as, government is to serving a kindred purpose.
tached

be supported; we are to pay our just debts.
Bdellostoma (del-los'to-ma), n. [Gr. bdella, Where it is used only with its own infinitive

Modest doubt is call'd
The beacon of the wise.

Shad,
a leech, and stoma, mouth.) A genus of it often expresses mere futurity, as in the
cyclostomous fishes nearly allied to the glu colloquial expression that is to be for future.

No flaming beacons cast their blaze afar. Gay.
tinons hag (Myscine glutinosa). They are "My wife thai is to be.' Dickens.Been and, (Various hills in England get the name of
found in the Southern Ocean.

a common vulgarism introduced pleonasti Beacon from the fact of signal-fires having
Be (bē), v. substantive verb, pres. am, art cally into the perfect and pluperfect tenses been formerly lighted on them.).
(sometimes beest), is, are (sometimes be); of other verbs: often extended to been and Beacon (bėkn), 0.t. To afford light or aid,
pret, was, were; subj. be; imper, be; pp. gone and

as a beacon; to light up; to illumine; to
Fåte, får, fat, fyll; mé, met, her; pine, pin; note, not, move; tūbe, tub, byll; oil, pound; ü, Sc. abune; y, Sc. ley.

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used, under the name of a rosary, by Bead-moulding (bēd'mol Roman Catholics in numbering their prayers,

same as Bead, 5. se bead being passed at the end of each Bead-plane (bēd'plān), n. jaculation or short prayer; hence the

for forming a bead. pirace to tell one's beads, literally to num. Bead-proof (bēd'pröf), a. be one's prayers, but used simply in the

to spirituous liquors on tense of to say one's prayers.

being shaken, a crown of Ere yet, in scorn of Peter's-pence,

for some time.-2. A tere Asd number'd bead, and shrift,

which comes up to a cu Blaf Harry broke into the spence, And turn'd the cow's adrift. Tennyson.

strength, as ascertaine

BBAD, 4. 1 Any small globular body, as a small piece Bead-roll (bēd’ról), n. of metal on a gun-barrel to take aim by, a a list or catalogue of per drop of liquid, and the like.

of whose souls a certain Ricadi of sweat have stood upon thy brow. Shuk.

is to be said or counted ! In cherr, a glass globule for trying the

a chaplet rosary; a roll strength of spirits. Beads are numbered

hence, any list or catalog socording to their specific gravities, and

of her vicious tricks.' the strength of the spirit is denominated by

Dan Chaucer, well

Eng the number of that one which remains sus

On Fame's eternal bead-r pended in it, and neither sinks to the bottom bor inats on the surface. Beads, in deter

Beads-man (bēdz'man) mining the strength of spirits, are now for

ployed in praying, gene the most part superseded bythe hydrometer.

another. In this sense

in former times at the á In arch. and joinery, a small round soulding sometimes cut into short emboss

tions or letters to grea ments, like pearls in a necklace; an astragal.

servant' or 'humble The bead is of frequent occurrence in archi

Whereby ye shall bind tecture , particularly in the classical styles,

man for ever unto almight; and is used in picture-frames and other

2. One who resides in e tem carved in wood. Among joiners supported from its fu Hotel mare variously modified, as (a) Bead beggar.

(Scotch.11 and brett, framed work, where the panel is

more frequently Bede. Kush with the framing, and has a bead min

Bead-snake (bēd'sn: name of the Elaps ful of North America, grounds, especially p] potato, and burrowi is finely marked with

black. Though it po Fig. 2.

never seems to use t ou two elges in the direction of the grain

Beads-woman (bēdu only, while the ends are left plain (fig. 1).

ing woman: sometir $) Bead and flush, framed work in which a

to humble servar head is run on the edge of the framing (fig.

Honour done to yo 9. (9) Bead and quirk, a bead formed or

B. Jonson.-2. A w stuck, as it is called, on the edge of a piece Bead-tool (bēd'töl),

alms-house. of stuff flash with its surface (fig. 3). (a) Bead and double quirk, or return bead, a bead

has its cutting fac curve, so that it moulding when api Bead-tree (bēd'tre ach, nat. order Mel for beads in neckla especially in Spain name. See MELIA Beady (bēd'i), a.

Miss Crawley could Bute's beady eyes eag Beagle (bē'gl), n some conjectured and Gael. beag, 1 formerly kept to superseded by the is called by its na than the harrier, haired, and with est of them are dog

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Fig. 3.

Fig. 4

stuck on a piece of stuff, and quirked or
relieved on both surfaces (fig. 4). (e) Bead
belt and square work, when the panel has
leads on two of its edges on one side only,
and the other side is plain. ) Bead flush
and square, when the framing is beaded on
one side only
Bead (bed), 6. To distinguish or ortament

Fr.

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Pushers and proposed for to marry Miss

Thackeray.
- Let be, to omit or leave untouched; to let
alone

Leadhe, my prey. Dryden.
[It has been thonght better to exhibit the
ases of the verb in its various forms (am,
GTE, 18, 178, vene, &e.) here rather than in
fragmentary details at each individual

form.)
Be- (be), 2 prefis common to the Teutonic
languages, the same word as by. It has
various uses. (6) It changes substantives
and adjectives into verds; as, befriend, be-

night, becalm, belittle. (6) It changes in1

transitive verbs isto transitive, sometimes 2

modifying the root-meaning of the simple
verb; as, bezpeak, bethink, bezeeta, bequeath.
(c) It modifies also the root-meaning of cer-

tain transitive verbs; as, behold, bezeech, bed

fit. (d) It adds an intensive force to certain

transitive verbs, without modifying their y

root-meaning; as, bedaub, bepraise, besmear.
(@) It chauges the indirect object of the
simple verb into the direct, and vice verst;
thus, I strew the roses on the ground, but I

bestrew the ground with roses; I sprinkle 8

water on a dress, but I besprinkle a dress ly

with water. () It is the prefix of certain participles or participial adjectives, which have no fnite tenses, or whose finite tenses are very rarely

used; as, beloved, betroubled, bemused. (9) It enters into the composition of certain nouns substantive; as, denouns into adveròs and prepositions; as,

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signal. “That beacons the darkness of heaven.' with beads; to raise beads upon. Campbell

beaded with bubbles.' H. Smith. Beacon (bēkn), v.i. To serve as a beacon. Beaded (bēd'ed), a. Like a bead. W Not in vain the distance beacons, Tennyson. woolly breasts and beaded eyes.' Tennys

Bead-house (bēd'hous), n. Same as BC
Beaconage (bē’kn-aj), n. Money paid for

house.
the maintenance of beacons.
Beacon-blaze (bē'kn-blāz), n. A signal

Beading (bēd'ing), ns. In arch, a mould

in imitation of a bead.
light or fire. Tennyson.
Beaconed (bē'knd), a. Having a beacon.

Beadle (be'dl), n. (A. Sax. bydel or boe * The foss that skirts the beaconed hill. T.

from the A. Sax. beôdan, to bid, order,

command. See BID.) 1. A messenger Warton. Beacon-fire (bē'kn-fīr), n. A fire lighted up

crier of a court; a servitor; one who c

persons to appear and answer, Called as a beacon or signal; a signal fire. Beacon-tower (bē'kn-tou-er), n. A tower

an Apparitor or Summoner.-2. An office on which a beacon is raised. 'A beacon

& university whose chief business is to w tower above the waves.' Tennyson.

with a mace in public processions; a bed Bead (bēd), n. (A. Sax. bed, bead, a prayer, from

3. A parish officer whose business is to p

ish petty offenders; a church officer v biddan, to pray. Beads are used by Roman

various subordinate duties, as waiting Catholics to keep them right as to the num

the clergyman, keeping order in chui ber of their prayers, one bead of their rosary

attending meetings of vestry or session, being dropped every time a prayer is said;

And I, forsooth in love! I, that have been love's hence the transference of the name from

A very beadle to a humorous sigh, that which is counted (the prayers) to that A critic, nay, a night-watch constable, Sha which is used to count them. So in Sp. and Beadleism (bē'dl-ism), n. The acts, hat Pg. cuenta, conta, a bead, is from contar, to

language, &c., of beadles Dickens. count. The old phrase to bid one's beads

The office or ju means to say one's prayers. See BID.) 1.1 A Beadlery (bě dl-ri), n.

diction of a beadle. prayer. "Saying over a number of beads, Beadleship (bē'dl-ship), n. The office not understanded or minded on.' Injunc

beadle. tions to the Clergy, 1541.-2. A little perfor- Bead-mould (bēd' mold), n. A specie ated ball of gold, pearl, amber, glass, or the

fungus which attacks fruit-preserves. like, to be strung on a thread, the string

stems consist of single cells, loosely join thus formed being either worn round the

together, so as to present the appearand neck as an ornament, and called a necklace,

strings of beads. or used, under the name of a rosary, by Bead-moulding (bēd’mõld-ing), n. In a Roman Catholics in numbering their prayers,

same as Bead, 5. one bead being passed at the end of each

Bead-plane (bēd'plān), n.

In carp. арejaculation or short prayer; hence the

for forming a bead. phrase to tell one's beads, literally to num

Bead-proof (bēd'pröf), a. 1. A term apr ber one's prayers, but used simply in the

to spirituous liquors on whose surface, a sense of to say one's prayers,

being shaken, a crown of bubbles will'st Ere yet, in scorn of Peter's-pence,

for some time.-2. A term applied to si And number'd bead, and shrift,

which comes up to a certain standar Bluff Harry broke into the spence, And turn'd the cowls adrift. Tennyson.

strength, as ascertained by beads.

BEAD, 4. 3. Any small globular body, as a small piece Bead-roll (bēd'rol), n. In the R. Cath. of metal on a gun-barrel to take aim by, a a list or catalogue of persons for the re drop of liquid, and the like.

of whose souls a certain number of pra Beads of sweat have stood upon thy brow. Shuk. is to be said or counted off on the bea 4. In chem. a glass globule for trying the

a chaplet rosary; a roll of prayers or hyn strength of spirits. Beads are numbered

hence, any list or catalogne. The bead

of her vicious tricks.' Prior.
according to their specific gravities, and
the strength of the spirit is denominated by

Dan Chaucer, well of English undefiled

On Fame's eternal bead-roll worthy to be file the number of that one which remains sus

Spen pended in it, and neither sinks to the bottom

Beads-man (bēdz'man), n.

1. A man uor floats on the surface. Beads, in deter

ployed in praying, generally in praying mining the strength of spirits, are now for

another. In this sense the word was the most part superseded hythe hydrometer. in former times at the conclusion of 5. In arch. and joinery, a small round

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hest, dehalf, behoof. (h) It changes certain because, before, belowo, beside, besides. (1) It represents other Anglo-Saxon prefixes; as, believe =A. Sax, gelyfan, G. glauben. (Though a pure Anglo-Saxon prefix, it is frequently conjoined with Romance stems: comp. in addition to several of the above, the verbs becharm, besiege, betray.) Beach (bēch), 11. [Origin very doubtful. Perhaps Icel, bakki, a bank, the shore, with the k softened into ch. Comp. kirk, church; birk, birch, &c.] The shore of the sea or of a lake, which is washed by the tide and waves; the strand. It may be sometimes used for the shore of large rivers. - Raised beaches, in geol. a term applied to those long terraced level pieces of land, consisting of sand and gravel, and containing marine shells, now, it may be, a considerable distance above and away from the sea, but bearing sufficient evidences of having been at one time sea-beaches. In Scotland such a terrace has been traced extensively along the coast of the Western Highlands and elsewhere, at 25 feet above the present sealevel. Beach (bēcb), v. t. To run on a beach; as,

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tions or letters to great men as we nov moulding sometimes cut into short emboss

servant' or 'humble servant. ments, like pearls in a necklace; an astragal.

Whereby ye shall bind me to be your poor The bead is of frequent occurrence in archi

man for ever unto almighty God,

F2 tecture, particularly in the classical styles,

2. One who resides in a bede-house, and is used in picture-frames and other objects carved in wood. Among joiners

supported from its funds.—3. A privil

beggar. (Scotch.) In this last use sp heads are variously modified, as (a) Bead

more frequently Bedesman (which see)
and butt, framed work, where the panel is
flush with the framing, and has a bead run

Bead-snake (bēd'snāk), n.
name of the Elaps fulvius, a beautiful
of North America, inhabiting culti
grounds, especially plantations of the s
potato, and burrowing in the ground
is finely marked with yellow, carmine

black. Though it possesses poison-fa Fig. 1.

Fig. 2.

never seems to use them.

Beads-woman (bēdz'wy-man), n. 1. A ou two edges in the direction of the grain ing woman: sometimes used as equiv only, while the ends are left plain (fig. 1). to humble servant.' (See BEADS (6) Bead and flush, framed work in which a Honour done to your poor beads-wo bead is run on the edge of the framing (fig. B. Jonson. -2. A woman who resides 2). (c) Bead and quirk, a bead formed or alms-house. stuck, as it is called, on the edge of a piece Bead-tool (bēd'től), n. A turning tool of stuff flush with its surface (fig. 3). (d) Bead has its cutting face ground to a co and double quirk, or return bead, a bead curve, so that it may produce a c

moulding when applied to the work. Bead-tree (bēd'trē), n. The Melua AE ach, nat. order Meliaceæ. Its nuts ar for beads in necklaces by Roman Cati especially in Spain and Portugal; hen name. See MELIA. Beady (bēd'i), a. Bead-like.

Miss Crawley could not look without seei

Bute's beady eyes eagerly fixed on her, Tha Fig. 4

Beagle (bē'gl), n. [Origin unknown

some conjectured to be of Celtic orig stuck on a piece of stuff, and quirked or and Gael. beag, little.] 1. A small relieved on both surfaces (fig. 4). (e) Bead formerly kept to hunt hares, now a butt and square work, when thé panel has superseded by the harrier, which som beads on two of its edges on one side only, is called by its name. The beagle is s and the other side is plain. (1) Bead flush than the harrier, compactly built, sr and square, when the framing is beaded on haired, and with pendulous ears. The one side only.

est of them are little larger than ti Bead (bēd), 0.t. To distinguish or ornament dog.

we beached the ship. Beach-comber (běch'kõm-ér), n. 1. Nant.

a fellow who prowls about the sea-shore to plunder wrecks,and pick up waifs and strays of any kind. -2. A long wave rolling in from

the ocean. (American.) Beached (bēcht), p. and a. 1. Having a beach; bordered by a beach; formed by, or consisting of, a beach. "Upon the beached verge of the salt flood.' Shak. [Rare.)2. Run op a beach; stranded. Beach-man (bēch'man), n. A person on the

coast of Africa who acts as interpreter to siip-masters, and assists in conducting the trade. Beach-master (bēch'mas-têr), 2. Naut a superior officer with plenary powers, generally a captair, appointed to superintend the disembarkation of an attacking force. He generally leads the storming party. Beachy (bēch'í), a. Having a bench or beaches; consisting of a beach or beaches.

The beachy girdle of the ocean' Shak. Beacon (bē’kn), 1. (A. Sax. been, beácen, a

The po

Fig. 3

sign, a beacon, whence beck, beckon. See BECK.] An object visible to some distance, and serving to notify the presence of danger; as a signal-fire to give notice of the approach of an enemy; a mark or object of some kind placed conspicnously on a coast or over a rock or shoal at sen for the guidance of vessels; hence, in general, anything serving a kindred purpose

Modest doubt is call's The beacon of the wise. No Haming beacons cast their blaze afar. Gay. (Various hills in England get the name of Beacon from the fact of signal-tires having been formerly lighted on them.) Beacon (békn), 2.1. To afford light or aid, is a beacon; to light up; to illumine; to

ch, chair;

ch, Sc. loch;

g. go;

j, job;

i, Fr. ton;

ng, sing;

TH, then; t.

oil, pound; ū, &e sbane; , Scley.

BEAR

BEAM

238

the expenses must be borne.] state; as, the deed bore

• The letters -Sebagr down, to force dowu; fig. to over years ago.

was at hand.' Sir W. pe; to fanquish; as, to bear down all sposition. – To bear one hard, to cherish against. See above, 6. {grudge towards a person

(naut.), to change the cous

close hauled or sailing wit Though he bear me hard, I yet mast do him right.

B. Jonson.

make her run before the

with, to run or tend towaru -To bear of, (a)t to restrain; to keep from

in with the land: oppos

keeping at a greater dis Do yes suppose the state of this realın to be now s teebke that it cannot bear off a greater blow than on or upon. See above,

Sir. Hayward bear up, (a) (naut.) to cl 1) Sout to remove to a distance; to keep

of a ship when close haul clear from rubbing against anything; as, to

a side wind, and make he bar of a boat. (c) To gain and carry off;

wind. (b) To be supported Ey be bore of the prize. - To bear out, (a) to

to be firm; not to sink; as Eve support or countenance to.

afflictions. So long as ne

with this exercise.' Sha (espany only can bear a man out in an ill thing.

South.

to endure what is unpleas Oh To procure countenance for.

gent; to forbear to resent, Il cannot once or twice in a quarter bear eu! Reason would that I shoul doar against an honest man, I have but a very me cest sith your worship.

Shak.

| Bear (bār), n. (A. Sax. ber {ri To defend; to support; to uphold; to G. bär, Icel. bera, a shead: with a personal object; as, to bear word in Icel. Sw. and Dan I ferson out in his statement. To ened form björn.) 1. Ay Ema; to corroborate; to establish; to jus orous mammal of the ge By: with a thing for the object. ‘A simile Ursidæ. The teeth are for list bere out Meg's eulogium on his style of

as in the dog, but there digtersation.' Dickens. (e)t With a more

sectorial tooth, and then car less indefinite it for the object (1) to last tubercular character tha through; to endure.

vores. The eyes have a nic Love akers not with his (Time's) brief hours and

the nose is prominent ar La bears it out even to the edge of doom. Shać.

tail very short. The brow

Europe is the Urstis arcto if that the Turkish fleet ke set eashelter'd and embay'd, they are drowned;

almost all the northern liis impossible they bear it out.

Shak, To enable to endure; to render supportable 'For toming away, let summer bear it out.' Shak. – To bear through, to conduct

Manage. To bear through cazanlahip. B. Jonson. To bear up, (a) to

the
support; to keep from sinking.
Rescious hope bears up the mind under sufferings.
014 To arrange, contrive, devise.

Addison.
I have made him know

cas

are a servant comes with me along, That says epon me, whose persuasion is

Brown Bear (Urs I come about my brother. -'Tis

well borne up. Shak. -To bear a body, in painting, to be capable of

Asia, and was at one ti being ground so fine and mixed so entirely

British islands. It fee with the oil as to seem only a very thick oil

honey, ants, and, el the saine colour: said of a colour.–To bear

It is 4 feet Jon date, to have the mark of time when written

[graphic]
[graphic]

BEAR

the lighter scale of a balance does so as to Beam-filling (bēm 'All-ing), n. 1. In arch. strike against the beam when it becomes the filling in of masonry or brickwork beoblique; hence, to be very light.

tween beams or joists, its height being equal In these he put two weights,

to the depth of the timbers filled in.The sequel each of parting and of night;

2. Naut. that portion of the cargo which is The latter quick upiew and kicked the beam. stowed betwixt the beams.

Milton. ((?) The pole of a carriage which runs be. Beamful (bēm'fyl), a. Emitting beams; tween the horses. (C) A cylindrical piece of

beaming; bright." Beamful lamps. Dray. wood, making part of a loom, on which

ton. weavers

wind the warp before weaving; also, Beaming-machine (hēm'ing-ma-shēn), n. the cylinder on which the cloth is rolled as

A machine by which chains or webs are put it is woven.

on the beam. It is a kind of roller-mill.

Beamless (bēm'les), a. Emitting no rays of The staff of his spear was like a weaver's beam.

1 Sam. xxii. 7.

light; rayless. The beamless eye no more (1) The straight part or shank of an anchor.

with ardour bright.' Thomson. (9) One of the strong transverse pieces of Beamlet (bēm'let), n. [Dim. of beam.) A timber stretching across a ship from one

little beam, as of light. side to the other to support the decks and Beam-tree (bēm/trē), n. Pyrus Aria, also

called white-beam. retain the sides at their proper distance.

Its wood is hard, comFrom the beams extending quite across the

pact, and tough, and is used for axle-trees, vessel where it is broadest, the term is often

naves of wheels, and cogs of machinery. used to express the width of a ship; thus, a Beamy (bem'i), a. 1. Emitting rays of light; wide vessel is said to have more beam than radiant; shining: Beamy gold.' T'ickell, & narrow one.-On the beam, on a line with 2. Fig. radiant; joyous; gladsome. Read the beams, or at right angles with the keel. my pardon in one beamy smile.' J. Baillie. Abaft the beam, before the beam, are simi 3. Resembling a beam in size and weight; lar phrases. -On the weather beam, on the massy. His . . . beamy spear.' Dryden. weather side of the ship.-On the beam ends,

4. Having horns or antlers. Beamy stags.' a phrase indicating the position of a ship Dryden. which inclines so much to one side that her Bean (bēn), n. (A. Sax. bean, Icel. baun, Sw, beams approach a vertical position; hence,

böna, Dan. bönne, D. boon, G. bohne.) A fig. to be on one's beam ends, to be thrown name given to several kinds of leguminous or lying on the ground; to be in bad circum

seeds and the plants producing them. They stance; to be at one's last shift. (h) The belong to several genera, particularly to main piece of a plough, in which the plough

Faba, garden and field bean; Phaseolus, tails are fixed, and by which it is drawn.

French or kidney-bean; and Dolichos, tro(i) The oscillating lever of a steam-engine

pical bean. The common bean (F. vulgaris) turning upon a centre, and forming the me is cultivated both in fields and gardens as dium of communication between the piston.

food for man and beast. There are many rod and the crank-shaft. Called also Work varieties, as the mazagan, the Windsor, the ing or Walking Beam.-Beam centre, the

long-pod, &c., in gardens, and the horse fulcrum or pin on which the working-beam

or tick bean in fields. The seed of the vibrates. Called also Beam Gudgeon. -2. The

Windsor is fully an inch in diameter; the main stem of a deer's horns bearing the

horse-bean is much less, often not much snags or antlers. One of the snags them

more than half an inch in length and threeselves is sometimes called the beam antler.

eighths of an inch in diameter. Beans are 3. A ray of light, or more strictly a collec very nutritious, containing 36 per cent of tion of parallel rays of light emitted from

starch and 23 per cent of nitrogenous matthe sun or other luminous body. The middle ter called legumin, analogous to the caseray is the axis.

ine in cheese. The bean is an annual, from Yon silver beams,

2 to 4 feet high. The flowers are fragrant. Sleep they less sweetly on the cottage thatch For kidney-bean or French - bean, scarletThan on the dome of kings?

Shelley.

runner bean, tropical bean, see these entries Hence-4. Fig. a ray or emanation of splen and PHASEOLUS, DOLICHOS. - Bean ore, dour. Beams of majesty' Tillotson. brown iron ore occurring in ellipsoidal conBeam (bēm), v.t. 1. To shoot forth or emit, cretions. Ure. as beams or rays.

Bean (ben), a. Same as Bein. God beams this light into men's understandings.

Bean-caper (bēn'kā-per), n. Zygophyllum

South. Fabago, a small tree growing in warm 2. In weaving, to put on the beam, as a chain climates. The flower-buds are used as or web.

capers. Beam (bēm), v.i. To emit rays of light or Bean-cod (bēn'kod), n. 1. A bean-pod. beams; to give out radiance; to shine. 2. A small fishing vessel or pilot boat used A mighty light flew beaming every way. Chapman.

in the rivers of Portugal. It is sharp forMore bounteous aspects on me beam,

ward, having its stem bent above into a Me mightier transports move and fill. Tennyson. great curve and plated with iron.

Bean-feast (bēn'fest), n. A feast given by Beam-bird (bēm'bérd), n. 1. A name sometimes given to the spotted flycatcher (Mus

an employer to those whom he employs.

Brewer. cica pa grisola) because it often builds its

A beautiful fly of a

Bean-fly (běn'fli), n. nest on the projecting end of a beam or rafter in a building. -2. A provincial name

pale purple colour found on bean flowers, for the pettychaps or garden warbler (Sylvia produced from a maggot called inida. hortensis)

Bean-goose (bēn'gos), n. A species of wild. Beam-compass (hēm'kum-pas), n. An in

goose, the Anser segetum, a migratory bird, strument consisting of a wooden or brass

which arrives in England in autumn and
retires to the north in the end of April. It
is so named from the likeness of the upper
nail of the bill to a horse-bean.
Bean-king (bēn'king), n. The person who
presided as king over the twelfth - night

festivities: so called because the honour
Beam-compass.

fell to him who, when the twelfth-night

cake was distributed, got the bean buried beam, having sliding sockets that carry steel in it. or pencil points; used for describing large Bean-mill (bên'mil), n. A mill for splitting circles.

beans for cattle-feeding. Beamed (bēmd), a. Having beams or horns; Bean-sheller (bên'shel-er), n. A machine having all its antlers put forth, as the head for removing the hulls from beans. of a stag. There were many great beamed Bean-shot (bên' shot), n. Copper grains deer in it.' J. F. Campbell.

formed by pouring melted metal through a Beam-engine (bēm'en-jin), n. A steam. perforated ladle into warm water. If cold engine in which the motion of the piston is water is used flakes are formed, called transmitted to the crank by means of an feather-shot. overhead-beam and connecting-rod, as dís- Bean-stalk (bēn'stak), n. The stem of a tinct from a direct-action engine and a side bean, or the whole plant; as, Jack and the lever engine, in which the motion is com bean-stalk. municated by two side - levers or beams, Bean-trefoil (bēn'tre-foil), n. A small legubelow the level of the piston cross-head. minous tree, the Anagyris fætida, having Beamer (bēm'ér), n. In weaving, a person trifoliate leaves, and bearing a pod curving whose business it is to put webs on the inward at the extremity. beam.

Bear (bār), v.t. pret. bore (formerly and still Beam-feather (bēm'feth-ér), n. One of the in the archaic style bare) pp. born, borne; long feathers in a bird's, particularly a por, bearing: [A. Sax. beran, pret. bar, pp. hawk's, wing

boren, found in similar forms throughout Fáte, fir, fat, fall; mé, met, hér; pine, pin; nõte, not, move; tube, tub, bull;

the Teutonic languages; 0. Sax. beran, Goth
bairan, Icel. bera, Sw. bora, Dan. bære, to
bear, to carry, to bring forth; D. baren, G.
gebüren, to bring forth. In the allied families
of languages it is represented by L. ferre, Gr.
pherein, Skr. bhri, to bear, to support. From
this stem come birth, burden, bairn, barrow.}
1. To support; to hold up; to sustain; as,
a pillar or girder bears the superincumbent
weight. -2. To suffer; to endure; to undergo;
as, to bear punishment, blame, &c. - 3. To
endure the effects of; to be answerable for;
hence, to give satisfaction for.

He shall bear their iniquities. Is. liii. 11.
4. To support or sustain without sinking,
yielding, shrinking, or suffering injury. 'A
wounded spirit who can bear?' Prov. xviii.
14.-5. To admit or be capable of, that is, to
suffer or sustain without violence, injury, or
change.

Io all criminal cases the most favourable interpre.
tation should be put on words that they can possibly
bear.

Swift.
6. To suffer without resentment or interfer-
ence to prevent; to endure patiently.

It was not an enemy that reproached me; then I
could have borne it.

Ps, ly, I3,
7. To sustain, as expense; to supply the
means of paying. Somewhat that will
bear your charges.' Dryden. - 8. To support
and remove from place to place; to carry;
to convey * They bear him upon the
shoulders.' Is. xlvi. 7.

And down a rocky pathway from the place
There care a fair-hair'd youth that in his hand

Bare victual for the mowers. Tennyson.
9. To wear; to carry as a mark of authority
or distinction; as, to bear a badge, a name;
to bear arms in a coat. Hence-10. To carry,
as in show; to exhibit; to show. Bear
welcome in your eye.' Shak.-11. To render;
to bring forward; to give; to afford; as, to
bear testimony; to bear a person company.
Thou shalt not bear false witness against
thy neighbour.' Ex. xx. 16. – 12. To enter-
tain; to have in the mind : to cherish, as
love, hatred, envy, respect, and the like.
• The ancient grudge I bear him.' Shak.
" The reverent care I bear unto my lord.
Shak. "The great and guilty love he bare
the queen.' Tennyson. - 13. To possess,
as a property, attribute, or characteristic;
to have in or on; to contain; as, to bear
signs or traces; to bear an inscription; the
contents which the letter bears. The
wounds his body bears.' Shak. * And bear
the name and port of gentlemen?' Shak.-
14. To possess and use, as power; to exer-
cise; to be charged with; to administer:
as, to bear sway. She bears the purse.
Shak

Russia soon showed that she was resolved to bear
a part in the quarrels as well as the negotiations of
her neighbours.

Broughan.
15. To deal with; to carry on.
This conference was sadly borne, Shak.

Beware
of entrance to a quartel, but being in,
Bear't that the opposed may beware of thee. Shak.
16. To manage; to direct; to use (what is
under the immediate control of one's will).
Bear your body more seeming.' Shak.
Hence, with the reflexive pronoun, to
behave; to act in any character; as, he
bore himself nobly.-17. To bring forth or
produce, as the fruit of plants or the young
of animals; as, to bear apples; to bear
children. "Life that bears immortal fruit.'
Tennyson.

And she conceived, and bare Cain, and said, !
have gotten a man from the Lord. Gen. iv. i.
18. Fig. to be the native place of.
Here dwelt the man divine whom Samos bore, Dryden.
19. To conduct; to guide; to take. "Bear
me unto his creditor.' Shak.-20. To drive;
to urge: with some word to denote the
direction in which the object is driven; as,
to bear down; to bear back.

The residue were so disordered as they could not
conveniently fight or fly, and not only justled and
bore down one another, in their confused tumb.
ling back, brake a part of the avant-guard.

Sir . Hayward
Confidence hath borne thee on, Milton.
21. To gain or wip : now commonly with
away or off': sometimes, formerly, witi an
indefinite it for the object
Some think to dear it by speaking a great word. Bacon,
(Bear, signifying to bring forth, has the past
participle when used passively spelled born,
but when used after the verb to have, borne.
Thus, a child was born; but, she has borne
a child In all the other senses both parti-
ciples are spelled borne; as, I have borne

mals.

unguent for the hair.

lives solitarily. The fat or executed; as, the letter bears date Sept. 30,

under the name of b 1700. - To bear a hand, (a) (naut.) to make haste; to be quick. (b) Colloq, to aid; to

bear is the Ursus ame asist; to lend a hand. - To bear in hand, shining hair, and rar to amuse with false pretences; to deceive.

length. The grisly bi Shak - To bear in mind, to remember. -

horribilis) is an inhal Te bear the bell, to be foremost in any trial

Mountains; it is a fe of skill or deed of glory; to carry off first

has a bulky and unwil

exceeding 9 feet in ler Bear (bar), o.s. 1. To suffer, as with pain.

less capable of great They dare as heroes but they felt as men. Pope.

The Siberian bear (Ura ? To be patient; to endure. (Rare.)

a variety of the browi I can not, can not bear.

white bear (Ursus mo

Dryden.
1 To produce, as fruit; to be fruitful, in

possessed of great st
opposition to barrenness; as, the tree still
Datinues to bear.-4. To take effect; to suc-
ceed

honours

Shak.

Having pawned a full suit of clothes for a sunt of
nimey, which, my operator assured me, was the last
beskould want to bring all our matters to bear,

Guardian.
61 To act in any character.

Instruct me
How I may formally in person bear

Uke a true (riar.
6 To lean; to weigh; to rest burdensomely;
as, the sides of two inclining objects bear
upon or against one another.

In the important matter of taxation, the point in
which the pressure of every government bears the

Polar Bear most constantly upon the whole people. Brougham. 7. To tend to be directed in a certain way,

It lives in the pola whether with or without violence; as, to

ice, and feeds on 1 bear away; to bear back; ('Bearing back ally is 7 to 8 feet fron the blows of their sable antagonist.' Sir W. Scott); to bear in; to bear ont to sea :

be seen frequently to bear upoz; to bear down upon (the fleet

droves, and will habitations of the

break in. The na Spinola, with his shot, did bear upon those within, who appeared upon the walls. Sir . Hayward.

Wales is the koala Lowa upon him bare the bandit three. Tennyson.

Phascolarctos.-2

stellations in the Hence-8 To relate; to refer: with upon; 14, it is difficult to see how this objection

called the Greater

tail of the Lesser bears upon the satject ander consideration, 3. Naut, a square

To be situated as to the point of the
Compase, with respect to something else;

are fastened son

used to clean a the land bore L.N.E. from the ship. - stone cannot be 19 Tr purport; to imply: to import; to

a portable punchit ch duin; ch. sc. Voch; 8.go; j. job; A, Fr. ton; 18,

bore down upon the enemy)

oil, pound;

ü, Sc. abune;

9. Sc. fey.

BEAR

BEAR

239

the Teutonic languages; 0 Sax. beran, Goth bairan, Icel, bera, Sw, bura, Dan. bære, tu bear, to carry, to bring forth; D. baren, G. geburen, to bring forth. In the allied families of languages it is represented by L. ferre, Gr. pherein, Skr. bhri, to bear, to support. From this stem come birth, burden, bairn, barrow.) 1. To support; to hold up; to sustain; as, a pillar or girder bears the superincumbent weight. -2. To suffer; to endure; to undergo; as, to bear punishment, blame, &c. - 3. To endure the effects of; to be answerable for; hence, to give satisfaction for.

He shall bear their iniquities. Is. liii. 11. 4. To support or sustain without sinking, yielding, shrinking, or suffering injury. A wounded spirit who can bear!' Prov. xviii. 14.-5. To admit or be capable of, that is, to suffer or sustain without violence, injury, or change.

In all criminal cases the most favourable interpretation should be put on words that they can possibly bear.

Swift. 6. To suffer without resentment or interference to prevent; to endure patiently. It was not an enemy that reproached me; then I

Ps. lv. 12. could have borne it. 7. To sustain, as expense; to supply the

means of paying. Somewhat that will
bear your charges.' Dryden. --8. To support
and remove from place to place; to carry;

to convey. They bear him upon the
| shoulders.' Is. xlvi. 7.

And down a rocky pathway from the place
There came a fair-hair'd youth that in his hand

Bare victual for the mowers, Tennyson.
9. To wear; to carry as a mark of authority
or distinction; as, to bear a badge, a name;
to bear arms in a coat. Hence--10. To carry,
as in show; to exhibit; to show. 'Bear
welcome in your eye.' Shak.--11. To render;
to bring forward; to give; to afford; as, to
bear testimony; to bear a person company.
'Thou shalt not bear false witness against
thy neighbour.' Ex. xx. 16.–12. To enter-
tain; to bave in the mind; to cherish, as
love, hatred, envy, respect, and the like.
"The ancient grudge I bear him.' Shak.

The reverent care I bear unto my lord.'
Shak. The great and guilty Jore he bare
the queen.' Tennyson. 13. To possess,
as a property, attribute, or characteristic;
to have in or on; to contain; as, to bear
signs or traces; to bear an inscription; the
contents which the letter bears. 'The
wounds his body bears.' Shak. 'And bear
the name and port of gentlemen!' Shak. -
14. To possess and use, as power; to exer-
cise; to be charged with; to administer:
as, to bear sway. She bears the purse.
Shak.

Russia soon showed that she was resolved to borr
A part in the quarrels as well as the negotiations of
her neighbours.

Drougkara.
15. To deal with; to carry on
This conference was sadly borne.

Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in,

the expenses; the expenses must be borne.) state; as, the deed bore to be dated - To bear down, to force down; fuy. to over years ago.

• The letters bore that succ come; to vanquish; as, to bear down all was at hand. Sir W. Scott. Το opposition. To bear one hard, to cherish against. See above, 6. To bear a a grudge towards a person.

(naut.), to change the course of a ship w Though he bear me hard,

close hauled or sailing with a side wind, I yet must do him right. B. Jonson. make her run before the wind.-To bea - To bear off, (a)t to restrain; to keep from

with, to run or tend toward; as, a ship be approach.

in with the land: opposed to bear of Do you suppose the state of this realm to be now

keeping at a greater distance. — To? so feeble that it cannot bear of a greater blow than

on or upon. See above, 6, 7, and 8.this?

Sir J. Hayward. bear up, (a) (naut.) to change the con (6) Naut. to remove to a distance; to keep

of a ship when close hauled or sailing v clear from rubbing against anything; as, to

a side wind, and make her run before bear off a boat. (c) To gain and carry off;

wind. (6) To be supported; to have fortitu as, he bore off the prize. - To bear out, (a) to

to be firm; not to sink; as, to bear up ur give support or countenance to.

afflictions. 'So long as nature will bear

with this exercise. Shak.-To bear u Company only can bear a man out in an ill thing.

South.

to endure what is unpleasing; to be in (6) To procure countenance for.

gevt; to forbear to resent, oppose, or pun If I cannot once or twice in a quarter bear out Reason would that I should bear with you. a knave against an honest man, I have but a very

Acts xviii. little credit with your worship.

Shak.

Bear (bār), n. [A. Sax. bera, a bear; D. b (c) To defend; to support; to uphold; to G. bär, Icel. bera, a she-bear, the com second: with a personal object; as, to bear word in Icel. Sw. and Dan. being the leng a person out in his statement. (d) To con ened form björn.) 1. A plantigrade care firm; to corroborate; to establish; to jus orous mammal of the genus Ursus, far tify: with a thing for the object. A simile Ursidæ. The teeth are forty-two in num that bore out Meg's eulogium on his style of as in the dog, but there is no carnassia conversation.' Dickens. (e)t With a more sectorial tooth, and the molars have a m or less indefinite it for the object (1) to last tubercular character than in other ca through; to endure.

vores. The eyes have a nictitating membra Love alters not with his (Time's) brief hours and the nose is prominent and mobile, and weeks,

tail very short. The brown or black bea But bears it out even to the edge of doom. Shak.

Europe is the Ursus arctos. It is a nativ If that the Turkish fleet almost all the northern parts of Europe Be not enshelter'd and embay'd, they are drowned; It is impossible they bear it out.

Shak, (2) To enable to endure; to render supportable.

For turning away, let summer bear it out.' Shak. - To bear through, to conduct or manage. To bear through

the consulship.' B. Jonson. - To bear up, (a) to support; to keep from sinking. Religious hope bears up the mind under sufferings.

Addison. () To arrange, contrive, devise.

I have made him know I have a servant comes with me along, That stays upon me, whose persuasion is

Brown Bear (Ursus arctos). I come about my brother.- 'Tis well borne up. Shak. - To bear a body, in painting, to be capable of Asia, and was at one time common in being ground so fine and mixed so entirely

British islands. It feeds on fruits, ro with the oil as to seem only a very thick oil

honey, ants, and, in case of need, on m of the same colour: said of a colour.-To bear

mals. It is 4 feet long and 24 high, date, to have the mark of time when written lives solitarily. The fat is in great requ or executed; as, the letter bears date Sept. 30,

under the name of bear's grease, as 1700.-To bear a hand, (a) (naut.) to make unguent for the hair. The American b haste; to he quick. (0) Colloq. to aid ; to bear is the Ursus americanus, with bi assist; to lend a hand. - To bear in hand, shining hair, and rarely above 5 fee to amuse with false pretences; to deceive.

length. The grisly bear (Ursus feroShak. - To bear in mind, to remember.

horribilis) is an inhabitant of the Ro To bear the bell, to be foremost in any trial

Mountains; it is a ferocious animal, of skill or deed of glory; to carry off first

has a bulky and unwieldy form, someti honours.

exceeding 9 feet in length, but is never Bear (bār), v.i. 1. To suffer, as with pain.

less capable of great rapidity of mot They bore as heroes but they felt as men.

The Siberian bear (Ursus collaris) is pert Pope.

a variety of the brown bear. 2. To be patient; to endure. [Rare.]

white bear (Ursus maritimus) is an ani I can not, can not bear.

Dryden. possessed of great strength and fiercer 3. To produce, as fruit; to be fruitful, in opposition to barrenness; as, the tree still continues to bear.-4. To take effect; to succeed.

Having pawned a full suit of clothes for a sum of money, which, my operator assured me, was the last he should want to bring all our matters to bear.

Guardian. 5. To act in any character.

Instruct me
How I may formally in person bear
Like a true friar.

Shak.
6. To lean; to weigh; to rest burdensomely;
as, the sides of two inclining objects bear
upon or against one another.

In the important matter of taxation, the point in which the pressure of every government bears the

Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus). most constantly upon the whole people. Brougham. 7. To tend; to be directed in a certain way, It lives in the polar regions, chiefly on whether with or without violence; as, to ice, and feeds on fish, seals, &c., and bear away; to bear back; ( Bearing back ally is 7 to 8 feet in length. It is sa froin the blows of their sable antagonist.' be seen frequently in Greenland in Sir W. Scott); to bear in; to bear out to sea : droves, and will sometimes surround to bear upon; to bear down upon (the fleet habitations of the natives and attem bore down upon the enemy).

break in. The native bear of New S Spinola, with his shot, did bear upon those within, Wales is the koala, of the marsupial who appeared upon the walls. Sir 7. Hayward. Phascolarctos. — 2. The name of two

Down upon him bare the bandit three. Tennyson. stellations in the northern hemisp Hence-8. To relate ; to refer: with upon; called the Greater and Lesser Bear. I as, it is difficult to see how this objection tail of the Lesser Bear is the pole-stbears upon the subject under consideration. 3. Naut. a square piece of wood on w 9. To be situated as to the point of the are fastened some pigs of iron ba compass, with respect to something else; used to clean a ship's deck when a as, the land bore E.N.E. from the ship. stone cannot be had.-4. In metal-wor 10. To purport; to imply: to import: to a portable punching-machine for iron p

The pole

[graphic]

Bear't that the opposed may beware of thee. Shat.
18 To manage; to direct; to use (what is
under the immediate control of one's will)
Bear your body more seeming.' Shak.
Hence, with the reflexive pronoun, to
behave; to act in any character; as, he
bore himself nobly.-17. To bring forth or
produce, as the fruit of plants or the young
of animals; as, to bear apples; to bear
children. "Life that bears immortal fruit.
Tennyson.

And she conceived, and tare Cain, and said, I
have gotten a man from the Lord.

Gen. iv, i
18. fig. to be the native place of.
leredwelt the man divine whom Sarzos bore. Dryden.
9. f To conduct; to guide; to take. "Bear
ne unto his creditor. Shak.--20. To drive;
Ourge: with some word to denote the
irection in which the object is driven; as,

bear down, to bear back.
The residue were so disordered as they could not
onveniently fight or lly, and not only justled and
re down one another, but, in their confused tumb
ng back, brake a part of the avant-guard.

Sir 7. Hayura:
Confidence hath borne thee on.

To gain or win: now commonly with
vay or off: sometimes, formerly, with an
definite it for the object.
me think to bearilby speaking a great word. Bacon.
wear, signifying to bring forth, has the past
rticiple when used passively spelled born,
it when used after the verb to brave, borne.
118, a child was born; but, she has borne
child. In all the other senses both parti-
ples are spelled borne, as, I have ourne
1, pound; ü, Sc. abune; . Seley.

[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

Written

BEAT
Emaining, to excavate: usually applied to music, (a) the beating or p
bard ground. - To beat back, to compel to from the joint vibrations
Mure or return. To beat down, (a) to break, the same strength, and a
destop, throw down, by beating or batter- () The rise or fall of the
in n a wall (o) To press down or lay flat, regulating the division of
as by treading, by a current of water, by shake or transient grace-
valent Find, &c. (c) To cause to lower a diately before the pote
ptics by importunity or argument; to sink ornament.
er lassen the price or value of; to make
lower, as price or value.

Usary teatr down the price of land, Bacon, ,
(2) To depress or crush; as, to beat down
opposition. – To beat into, to teach or instil
by repetition of instruction. To beat of,

Beat.
bo repel or drive back. - To beat out, (a) to
eitend by hammering; hence, ng. to work -Beat or tuck of drum
out fully; to amplify;
to expand.

sion of strokes on a dr A man thinking on his legs is obliged to beat out betonght for his own sake, if not for the sake of his

ferent ways for particul

regulate a march, to ca. () To perform or execute, as a piece of

arms or quarters, to dire music, by, or as by, beats with the hands or

treat, &c. - Beat of a stroke made by the action A clock is said to be in according as the stroke

equal intervals. Tennyson. Beat (bēt), p. and a.

with Beaten, but more

Cornhill Mag.

nouns, thus we never sa army. Specifically, exl

phrase.

BEAT
BEARDED

240
ancient Egyptians, and frequently seen in unsupported span.--7, In mach. the part in Beasts of chase are the buck, the doe, the fox, the
their statues.
contact with which a journal moves; that

marten, and the roe. Beasts of the forest are the

hart, the hind, the hare, the boar, and the wolf. Bearded (bērd'ed), a. Having a beard in

Cowell.
part of a shaft or axle which is in contact

Beasts of warren are the hare and cony,
any of the senses of that word. Bearded with its supports.-8. In ship-building (pl.),
men.' Dryden. 'Bearded like a pard.' Shak. the widest part of a vessel below the plank

2. As opposed to man, any irrational animal,
"Torn out the bearded steel (an arrow) to sheer.-9. In her. the name applied to any as in the phrase 'man and beast.' 'A beast

that wants discourse of reason.' Shak.-
give me rest.' Dryden. 'Bearded barley.' single charge on a shield.-10. In geog. and
Tennyson.
naut. language, the direction or point of the

3. Fig. a brutal man; a person rude, coarse,
Beard-grass (bērd'gras), 1. 1. The common

filthy, or acting in a manner unworthy of a
compass in which an object is seen, or the

rational creature.
name of two well-known British grasses of situation of one object in regard to another, Beast+ (hēst), v.i. To hunt; as, 'Dian beasts
the genus Polypogon, given to them from with reference to the points of the compass.
the bearded appearance of the panicle. Thus, if from a certain situation an object is

with Cupid's darts.' Spenser.
2. The common name of plants of the genus seen in the direction of north-east, the bear-

Beast (vēst), n. A game of cards resembling
Andropogon.

loo.
ing of the object is said to be N. E. from the
Bearding-rine (běrd'ing-lin), 1. In ship situation-To take bearings, to ascertain on

Beastee (bēstē), n. Same as Beestie. building, a curved line formed by reducing what point of the compass Objects lie. The Beastings (bēst'ingz), n. pl. See BEESTINGS. the surface of the dead-wood to the shape term is also applied to ascertaining the situa Beastish (bēst'ish), a. Like a beast; brutal. of the vessel's body.

tion ordirection of any object estimated with It would be but a kind of animal or bea stish meetBeardless (bērd'les), a. Without a beard ;

Milton.

ing.
reference to some part of a ship, as on the
hence, of persons of the male sex, young; beam, before the beam, abaft the beam, &c. Beastliheadt (bēst'li-hed), n. (Beastly, and
not having arrived at manhood,

Hence, to make one's self acquainted with suffix-head=hood.) The character or quality
Beardlessness (bērd'les-nes), n.

The state the locality in which one is; to discover of a beast; beastliness: used by Spenser as
or quality of being destitute of beard. how matters stand; to get rid of bewilder a greeting to a beast.
Beardleted (bērdiet-ed), a. In bot. having ment or misunderstanding. - To lose one's

Sicke, sicke, alas! and little lack of dead,
little awns.
Paaton.

bearings, to lose all knowledge where one But I be relieved by your beastlyhead,
Beard-moss (bērd’mos), n. A lichen, U8 is, or how one is situated; to become bewil.

The Shepheard's Calender. nea barbata, which clothes our older forest dered or puzzled.

Beastlike (bēst'lik), a. Like a beast; brutal. trees with the shaggy gray fleece of its flaccid Bearingt (bār'ing), a. Solid; substantial.

Beastliness (bēstli-nes), n. 1. The state or threadlike fronds. It is the idle moss' of 'A good bearing dinner.' Beau. di Fi. quality of being beastly; brutality; coarseShakspere.

Bearing-cloth (bår'ing-kloth), n. The cloth ness; vulgarity; Althiness. Beardy (bērd'i), n. 1. The local name of the with which a child is covered when carried Rank inundation of luxuriousness whitethroat (Sylvia cinerea), one of our to church to be baptized. Called also Bear

Has tainted him with such gross beastliness.

Marston.
most lively and loquacious little birds. cloth.
2. A Scotch name of the loach (Cobitis

2. Absence of reason; stupidity. Beast

Thy scarlet cloth, as a child's bearing-cloth, liness and lack of consideration.' North.
barbatula), & small fresh-water malacop I'll use to carry thec out of this place. Shak.
terygian tish, family Cyprinidae, so called Bearing-rein (bār'ing-rān), n.

Beastly (bēstli), a. 1. Like a beast; brutal;

The rein by
from the six barbules which hang from tbe

coarse; filthy; contrary to the nature and
which the head of a horse is held up in
mouth. Written also Beardie.

dignity of man. 'Lewd, profane, and beastly
driving
A bier. Spenser.
Bearet (bēr), n.

B. Jonson. — 2. Pertaining to, or
Bearish (bár'ish), a. Partaking of the quali.
Bearer(vår ór), n. 1. One who bears, sustains,

having the form and nature of a beast;
ties of a bear.

animal. “Beastly divinities and droves of
or carries; a carrier. Bearers of burdens.

In our own language we seem to allude to this gods.' Prior.-3.1 The opposite of spiritual;
2 Chr. Ü. 18. The bearer of unhappy news. degeneracy of human nature when we call men, by natural.
Dryden. Specifically - 2. One who carries a

way of reproach, sheepish, bearish, &c. Harris
body to the grave; a pall-bearer. 'The king's Bear-leader (bār' lēd-ér), n. A person who

It is sowun a beestli bodi; it shal ryse a spiritual bodi,

Wicklife. body being by the bearers set down near the

leads about a trained bear for exhibition; place of burial.' Sir T. Herbert.-3. One who

SYN. Brutal, bestial, brutish, coarse, filthy. hence, applied to the tutor or governor ap- Beastlyt (bést'li), adv. In the manner of a wears anything, as a badge or sword; a

pointed to a youth of rank at the univer.
wearer. Thou (the crown) hast eat thy

beast; filthily, abominably. 'How beastly
sity or on his travels, or to one in a similar
bearer up.' Shak.-4. Any part of a structure

she doth court him.' Shak.
relation.
or machine that serves as a support to some

Beat (bēt), v.t. pret. beat; pp. beat, beaten;

Young gentleman, I am tbe bear leader, being
other part.-5. A tree or plant that yields

ppr. beating. (A. Sax. beátan; pret. beôt,
appointed your tutor. Colman the Younger,
fruit.

pp. beaten, Icel. bauta and bjata, O.H.G.
This way of procuring, autumnal roses, in some

Bearlike (bārlīk), a. Resembling a bear. pózan, to beat. Some of the meanings have that are good bearers, will socceed. Boyle. Bearnt (bårn), n. [A. Sax. bearn, from bear. no doubt been influenced by if pot directly 6. In printing, (a) type or furniture letter

See BAIRN.) A child; a bairn.

* They say borrowed from Fr, battre, to beat.] 1. To
high, to protect the face of the type in
bearns are blessings.' Shak.

strike repeatedly; to lay repeated blows
printing or stereotyping. (6) Same as Fris. Bear-pit (bār'pit), n. A pit prepared for the upon. He beat his breast.' Dryden.-2. To
ket.-7. In her. a supporter. -8. In old law,

keeping of bears in zoological gardens. In strike in order to produce a sound; to sound one who bears down or oppresses others by

the centre a stout pole, with cross-bars or by percussion; hence, to give notice of by beat vexatiously assisting a third party in main

steps at proper distances, is set up to enable of drum; as, to beat a drum or a tambourine: taining a suit against them; a maintainor.

the bear to indulge in climbing, of which it is to beat a tattoo; to beat a charge; to beat a Bear-iy (bårfli), n. An insect. Bacon,

fond. The pole must be at a distance suff retreat. [The last phrase often means simply
Bear-garden (bår' gör-dn), n. 1. A place

ciently far from the edge to prevent the to retire or retreat.}--3. To break, bruise,
where bears are kept for diversion, and for-
bear leaping from the pit.

comminute, or pulverize by beating or
Bear's-breech (bárz bréch), n. Same as
merly for fighting: Formerly called also

pounding, as pepper or spices.
Paris-garden and Bear's-college.

Brandeursine.
Bear's-colleget (bârz'kol-ej), n.

Thou shalt beat some of it very small. Ex. XIX. 36.

Same as
Hurrying me from the playhouse, and the scenes

Bear-garden.
there, to the bear-garden, to the apes, and asses,

The students in bear's-col

4. To extend by beating, as gold or other
and tigers.
Slillingfleet. lege.' B. Jonson.

malleable substance, or to hammer into
2. Any place of tumult or disorder.
Bear's-ear (bárz'er), n. The common name

any form; to forge.
Bearherd (bār'hérd), 16. A man that tends
of Primula auricula, given to it from the They did beat the gold into thin plates.

Ex. xxxix. 3.
shape of the leaf.
bears.
Virtue ts of so little regard in these costerinonger
Bear's-foot (bárz'fyt), n.

5. To force out from the husk by blows; to
A plant of the

thresh. Ruth ii. 17.-6. To mix or agitate
times, that true valour is turned bearnerd. Shad. genus Helleborus, I. fætidus. See HELLE-

by beating; as, to beat an egg.-7. To daslı,
BORUS.
Bear-hound (bárhound). n. A hound for
Bear's-grease (bārz'grēs), 1. The fat of

strike, or brush, as water or wind. Beat
hunting or baiting the bear.

with perpetual storms, Milton. - 8. To
bears, extensively used to promote the
Few years more and the Wolf-hounds shall fall
growth of hair.

lect 'The child's feet were busy beating
out the tane.' Cornhill Mag.

Perplext in faith, yet pure in deed,
At last he beat his music out.
-To beat up, to attack suddenly; to alarm
or disturb; as, to beat up an enemy'squarters.

less of an adjective, no Hence, to come upon a visit unexpectedly.

A distant relation left hird an estate in Ireland, where he had resided ever since, making occasional

mental or bodily; fatig Pads to the Continent and deating up his old quarters, toil. 'Quite beat and ta rately coming to England.

Lawrence

disappointed.' DickenTo beat time, to measure or regulate time

beat, thoroughly exhau in music by the motion of the hand or foot.

as to be incapable To beat the dust, in the nanege, (a) to

thoroughly baffled by th take in too little ground with the fore-legs, thoroughly defeated in sa horse. (6) To perform his curvets too Beaten (bētn), p. and précipitately or too low. — SYN. To strike, by beating or treading; pound

, bang, buffet, maul, drub, thump gold. Shak. 'A broa paste, thwack, thrash, pommel

, break, Milton. — 2. Conquered bruse , bray, conquer, defeat, vanquish,

I suppose everything is Beat (bēt), i. 1. To strike repeatedly; to

being conqueror and I the knock, as at a door. The men of the city

3. Exhausted; worn 0 . beat at the door.' Judg. xix. 22. — 2. To

the difficulty of a task, move with paisation; to throb; as, the pulse

cal.--5. Rendered trit beats . 'A thousand hearts beat happily.'

sion; as, a well beater Byrest.–3. To act, dash, or fall with force

practised, Beau, & I or violence, as a storm, flood, passion, &c.;

Beater (bēt'èr), n. O as the tempest beats against the house.

beats: applied specific Rolling tempests vainly beat below.' Dry

for pounding or com

also to parts of vari And the sun beat upon the head of Jonah that he

striking part of a th Jonah iv. 8.

chine. Beater-up (bētér-up)

'A most stealer of deer and bea Butler.

[graphic]

overcome, surpasa.

[graphic]

1

The

taisted, and wished in himself to die. 4 To be tossed so as to strike the ground for game. violently or frequently. Floating corps Le beating on the shore. Addison.-5. To give notice by beating a drum; as, the Beatht (běth), v.t. To drummers beal for the soldiers to advance;

tall young oake also to sound on being beaten, as a drum.

steele to be in sted.' Ex Linden saw another sight

Beatific, Beatifical When the drum beat at dead of night. Campbell.

al), a. (See BEATIFY 9 To ponder; to be incessantly engaged; to

happy; imparting bli be anxiously directed to something: to be strangeness of the be in agitation or doubt 'To still my beating Beatiically (bē-a-t mind'

beatific manner. Thy heaven is on carth; thine eyes and thoughts

Beatification (bē-at' lez! 01 3 town, the treasure of thy heart.

act of beatifying o Shak.

nouncing happy; th 7. Neat to make progress against the direc

blessedness. tion of the wind by sailing in a zigzag line

the rest of a Chris of traverse. --To beat about, to search by

tion of his spirit.' various means or ways; to try to find. 'To

R. Cath. Ch. an act find an honest man, I beat about.' Pope. - be declares a pers To beat about the brush, to employ much

[graphic]

tread, as a path. The unguents sold under

Pass awful gulls and suppressed, the Bear hounds, the Falconry.

beat my painful way.' Blackmore.-9. To Carlyle.

this name, however, are in a great measure Bearing (bár'ing), n. 1. The act of enduring, made of hog's lard or veal fat, or a mixture

scour with bustle and outcry in order to

raise game; to drive game in. To beat the of both, scented and slightly coloured. especially of enduring patiently or without

woods and rouse the bounding prey.' Prior. complaining; endurance. Bear-skin (bår'skin), n. 1. The skin of a

10. To overcome in a battle, contest, or The two powers which constitute a wise woman

bear.--2. A coarse shaggy woollen cloth for are those of bearing and forbearing. over-coats.-3. A cap made of the skin of

strife; to vanquish or conquer; as, one beats

another at play, Trans, of Epictetus. the bear, especially that worn by soldiers. 2. The manner in which a person bears or

The bearskins of the French grenadiers rose

Pyrrbus beat the Carthaginians at sea. Arbuthnat. comports himself; carriage; mien: beha. above the crest of the hill.

Yonge. 11. To surpass; to excel; to go beyond ; as, viour. 'I know him by his bearing Shak. Bear's-whortleberry (bárz-whorti-be-ri), he beats them all at swimming. (Colloq.) A man of good repute, carriage, bearing, n. Same as Bearberry.

There is something out of common here that its and estimation.' Shak.-3. The mutual re. Bear-ward (bảr' ward), n. A keeper of bears. anything that ever came in my way.

Decke lation of parts of a whole; mode of connec.

We'll bait thy bears to death, tion.

12. To be too difficult for, whether intellecAnd manacle the bear wand in their chains. Sunk. But of this frame the dearings and the ties,

tually or physically; to baffle: as, it beats The strong connections, nice dependencies, Bear-whelp (bár whelp). n. The whelp of me to make it out. The violin beat me. Gradations just, has thy pervading soul

& bear. An unlicked bear-whelp.' Shak. W. H. Russell. (Colloq.}–13. To harass; to Look'd through?

Pore. Beast (best), nt. (O. E. beest, beste, from 0. Fr. exercise severely: to cudgel (one's brains) 4. Import: effect; force. To change the beste (Mod. Fr. Déte); from L bestia, a beast,

So Whacum beat his dirty brains bearing of a word.' Tennyson.-5. The act whence also D. L. G. Dan. beest.) I Any

Tadvance his master's fame and gains.

Hudinis or capability of producing or bringing forth; four-footed animal, as distinguished from

Why should any one ... beat his head about the as, a tree past bearing. fowls, insects, Ashes, and man; as, beasts

Latin grammar who does not intend to be a critic!

Lecke In travail of his bearing, his mother was first dead. of burden; beasts of the chase; beasts of

RV Gloucester. the forest. It is usually applied to large 14. To fatigue utterly; to prostrate; as, the 6. In arch, the space between the two fxed animals. “The beasts, the fishes, and the long and toilsome journey quite beat him. extremes of a piece of timber, or between winged fowls.' Shak. "One deep cry of (Collog. 1--15. To flutter: to flap; as, to beat one extreme and a supporter; that is, its great wild beasts.' Tennyson.

the wings: said of a bird. - To beat aray, fite, fiir, fat, fall; mė, met, her; pine, pin: note, not, move; tube, tub, bull; oil, pound; ü, Se. abune; , Se. fey

after death. This verbiage before coming to the main point of

canonization or th Aquestion; to equivocate ; to dilly-dally.-- | dignity of a saint. To beat upon, to enforce by repetition; to fied till fifty years reiterate How frequently and fervently,

tificates or attesta doth the Scripture beat upon this cause,

miracles are exami Hakovill

. - To beat up for recruits or sol. diers, to go about to enlist men into the

of rites, and this

often for years, a immy; a phrase originating in the fact that a recruiting party is often preceded by a

decrees the beatit drummer with his instrument.--To beat up

and relics of the in

to the veneration und deren, in hunting, to run first one way

Beatification, Cand Beat (bět), n. 1. A stroke; a striking; a | Beatify (bē-at'i-fi),

TION. . blow, whether with the hand or with a

ppr. beatifying. He with a careless deat

care, to make bles Struck out the mute Cication with a heat. Dryder,

facere, to make.]

bless with the co A recurrent stroke; a pulsation; a throb; | joyment.

Beati , the beat of the pulse; the heart makes from sixty to seventy beats a minute.

2. To pronounce 8 The sound made by the foot in walking or

conferring happir running; a footfall The beat of her unseen

ceits and phrases Teet, which only the angels hear' Shelley.

TOW. (Rare.) Spee A round of course which is frequently

Ch. to declare by Love over: , a watchman's beat; a milk.

a person is receiv man's beat. Hence- A place to which

he reverenced as

ized, de habitually or frequently resorts – &. In | Beating (bēt'ing), ehi, chain; ch, 8c. lock; 6.90; i, job; 1. Fr, ton; ng,

and then another: said of a stag.

weapon.

VOL 1

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