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Chessom (ches'sum), 1. [Connected with of Asia 0.E. chessil, chesil, A. Sax. ceosel, gravel, Europi pebbles, sand.) A kind of sandy and clayey perhap

most o earth. Halliwell.

in Brit The tender chessom and mellow earth is the best,

Bacon .

its fru being mere mould

shire a Chess-player (ches' plā-ër), . One who

The cl plays chess; one skilled in the game of chess. Chess-tree (ches'trē), n. Naut. a piece of from & wood bolted perpendicularly on the

side, to called confine the clews of the main-sail. Chessylite (ches'si-līt), [From Chessy, a

is mor town near Lyons, in France, where the

See CA mineral occurs, and Gr. lithos, a stone.) Cheste Same as Azurite, 1.

sembl. Chest (chest), 1. [A. Sax. cyste, North. E.

plum. and Se. kist, from L. cista, Gr. kisté, a chest, Chest. a box.) 1. A box of considerable size, made

boat-1 of wood or other material. Specifically.. Chest2. In com a case in which certain kinds of

saw W goods, as tea, indigo, &c., are packed for Cheta transit; hence, the quantity such a chest contains.--3. A coffin.

spotti He is now dead and nailed in his chest. Chaucer. lengti 4. The trunk of the body from the neck to leopa the belly; the thorax.-Chest of drawers. See juba Chest (chest), v.t. 1. To deposit in a chest;

mane to hoard. 2. To place in a coffin. We chested our late commander.

used

[graphic]

leopa:

n.

back

A spe

herish. Spenser.

with an n. Cherubims and Cherubins as The laurel. plurals are improper. (Heb. kerub.] 1. One uns), n. An old of an order of angels variously represented of burned. brandy at different times, but generally as winged een steeped, and spirits with a human countenance, and dis is now termed tinguished by the knowledge from the

seraphs, whose distinctive quality is love. an-di), n. Brandy The first mention of cherubs is in Gen. iii. n steeped

24, where the figure is not described, but nēkt), a. Having their office was, with a flaming sword, to cheeked country keep or guard the way of the tree of life.

The cherubs, in Ezekiel's vision, had each n. A soft coal, four heads or faces, the hands of a man, and ire, Derbyshire, wings. The four faces were the face of a sgow, &c. Though bull, that of a man, that of a lion, and that does not cake in of an eagle. They had the bodily form of - cheerful bright a man. Ezek. iv. and x. In the celestial

hierarchy cherubs are represented as spirits ul-ėrd), a. Col next in order to seraphs. The hieroglyphi

cal and emblematical figures embroidered and-ear'd caps, and

on the veils of the tabernacle are called vith cherry.colour'd cherubs of curious or skilful work. Ex. ir'd ribbon.

xxvi. -2. A beautiful child: so called beFielding Cerasin.

cause artists have generally represented -1), n. The Eng

cherubs as beautiful winged children. (In

this sense the plural is always cherubs.] tro-cerasus, nat.

Cherubic (che-ryb'ik), Q. Pertaining to or Asia Minor. It but must not be

resembling cherubs; angelic. The cherubic

host.' Milton. et bay or other

Cherubical (che-ryb'ik-al), a. Same as e leaves yield by

Cherubic. oil, nearly iden

The cherubical angel.' Sheldon.

Cherubim (cher'ü-bim), n. The Hebrew bitter almonds.

plural of cherub. he leaves is used

Cherubimic (cher:ū-bim'ik), a. Of or beway as diluted It is poisonous Cherubint (cher'ü-bin), a. Cherubic; an

longing to cherubim. -ér), n.

gelic. Her cherubin look,' Shak.

cherubint (cher'ū-bin), n. A cherub. siforme), whose aped.

God in either eye has placed a cherubin. Dryden. À child's play, This form has been used as an equivalent thrown into a

of the Hebrew plural Cherubim.

Cherup (cherup), n. (A form of chitrup, erry-pil with Satan.

chirp.] A chirp or chirrup. (Colloq.] Shak.

Cherup (cher'up), v.i. To chirpor chirrup. Rum in which

Cherupping birds.' Drayton.

Cherup (cher'up), v.t. To excite or arge on n. A tobacco

by chirping. (Rare.] ng stems of the ed the reddish

He cherups brisk his ear-erecting steed. Cowper. ometimes these Chervil (cher'vil), n. (A. Sax. cerfille, a conas straight and traction of L.choerophyllum, from Gr.chaire

phyllon-chairo, to rejoice, and phyllon, , n. The seed leaf, from the agreeable odonr of their

leaves.] The popular name of plants of the n-ér), n. One genus Cherophyllum, but especially of C the stones from temulum. This is the only British species; omestic imple it is a hairy herb of the nat. order Umbellilucing a forked feræ, with longish grooved fruits, common g the stone out in fields and waste places throughout Brit

ain. - Garden chervil is Anthriscus CereA tree pro

folium.-Sweet chervil is Myrrhis odorata, is mostly given an aromatic and stimulant umbellifer forcees and to that merly used as a pot-herb.- Needle chervil is ild cherry. The Scandix Pecten-Veneris, a cornfleld weed ed for cabinet like chervil, but with slender-beaked fruits.

Chese, t v.t. To choose. Chaucer. 2. Wine made Chesible t (ches'i-bl), n. A chasuble.

Cheslip (ches'lip), n. A wood-louse. (ProGr. chersonesos vincial.] aated land, and Chesnut. See CHESTNUT.

a tract of land Chess (ches), n. (From O.Fr. eschecs, Fr. h is nearly sur échecs, chess, really a plural, meaning, lit. ed to a larger kings, from Per. shåh, a king, the principal thmus; as, the figure in the game, whence also check, checknd; the Tauric

mate,

It. scacco, D. schaak, Dan, skak, Icel. Thracian Cher skák, G. schach, chess.] An ingenious game western side of

played by two persons or parties with dif. itten also Cher ferent pieces on a checkered board, divided

into sixty-four squares. Each party has becomes a cherso. eight dignified pieces: a king, a queen, two Sir T. Herbert.

bishops, two knights, and two rooks or Celtic; comp. castles; also eight pawns. The pieces of ety of quartz, the parties are of different colours. The psilex, or Rock object of the game is to checkmate the mmon quartz; enemy's king. See CHECKMATE, 11. Edal and dull, Chess (ches), n. In New England, the

more or less Bromus secalinus, a grass which grows numerous and

among wheat, bears some resemblance to y amorphous, oats, and is sometimes ground up with ules. It occurs wheat, when it is said to produce narcotic allic, in primi effects if eaten. Called also Cheat. is also applied Chess-apple (ches'ap-1), n. A species of mstone. Thus wild service, Cratæqus terminalis. vhich occur as Chess-board (ches' bord), n. The board one rocks, like used in the game of chess. rt. The Derby. Chessel (ches'sel), n. (From cheese.) A

black chert to mould or vat in which cheese is formed. the hornstone Chessex (ches'seks), n. The boards used for

the

flooring of a temporary military bridge. c; full of chert; Chess-man (chesʻman), 12. A piece used in

[graphic]

E. Terry

in ac

keepe Cheste, t t. [A. Sax.ceast, strife.] Debate;

andr quarrel; strife; enmity. The sinne of con

and a tumelie or strif and cheste.' Chaucer.

ner, Chested (chest'ed), a. Having a chest of

is fou this or that kind: used chiefly in composi

Chett tion; as, broad-chested, narrow-chested.

tree 1 Chesteine,t Chesteyn,t n. (0.Fr. chas

& vei taigne, L. castanea.] The chestnut-tree or

from
its fruit. Chaucer,

Upas
Chestert (ches'ter). A town. See CASTER.

stryc
Chesterfield (ches tér-feld), n. A kind of

tetan top-coat, named after the polished Earl of

the p Chesterfield.

which
Chest-founder (chest'found-er), 1. Chest-
foundering (which see).

Chett
Chest-foundered (chest'found-érd), a. Suf gener

fering under chest-foundering: said of a meas
horse.

ter, o
Chest-foundering (chest'found-ér-ing), n. Cheva
A disease in horses. It is a rheumatic

chever
affection of the muscles of the chest and
fore-legs, impeding both respiration and the

ditio
motion of the limbs.

Cheva
Chest-measurer (chest'mezh-ūr-ér), n. In

chief
med. an instrument

for determining the Cheva
mobility of the chest. It is a sort of spring,
which, when applied to the walls of the suppe
chest, measures the modifications of its dia-
meters, and indicates, by the motion of the

See).

mand index hand on a dial, any movement of

arrari respiration to the hundredth of an inch.

roads
Chestnut (ches'nut), . (For chesten-nut, being
from 0.E. chesteine, chesteyne, &c., and nut,

mang
from 0. Fr. Chastaigne (Mod. Fr. châtaigne), sels :
from L. castanea, the chestnut-tree, from
Gr. lastanon, a chestnut (the fruit), from

Th

alry:

Russ

Emp

Castana in Pontus, where this tree alyounded.] 1. The seed or nut of the chestnut Cher tree (Castanea vesca). It is inclosed in a CHE prickly pericarp, which contains two or Che more seeds.-2. The tree itself or its timber. loo 3. The colour of the husk of a chestnut; a reddish brown colour.

Che His hair is of a good colour.--An excellent colour, your chestnut was ever the only colour,

Shak.

hot Chestnut (ches'nut), a. Being of the colour of a chestnut; of a reddish brown colour. His chestnut curls clustered over his open brow.

eno

ah

[graphic]

playing the game of chess. erubs (cher'- chessnert (ches'ner), 9. A chess-player. erubim is also

Yonder's my game, which, like a politic cketsmer, ral is written I must not seem to sce.

T. Middleton

Disraeli. Chestnut-tree (ches'out-tré), T. Castanea

2 3 as

BE

Chestnist (Castanea vesca). venca, a tree, nat, order Corylacem, which produces the chestnut. Probably a native

ibe, tub, byli;

oil, pound;

ü, Sc. abune; 9. Sc. fey.

ch, chain;

[graphic]

estern side of played by two persons or parties with di

of chert; Chess-man (chesman), n. A piece used in

CHESSNER To cherish. Spenser with an 1. Clorubins and Comiti ba), n. The lanrel. plurals are improper. (Heb. keral] 21 he ri-bonns), An old of an order of angels variutuhy RUESE isting of burned brandy at different times, but generally are had been steeped, and spirits with a human countenance, endo what is now termed tinguished by their knowledge inn

seraphs, whose distietive quality e'ri-bran-di), 3. Brandy The first mention of chembe i bilai ve been steeped 24, where the figure is not descrital a lefri-chekt), a Having their office was, with a family and erry-checked country keep or guard the way of the inte de

The cherubs, in Ezekiel's visan

, hal al kol), the A soft coal, lour heads or faces, the hands dama fordshire, Derbyshire, wings. The four faces were the health ur Glasgow,&c. Though bull, that of a man, that of a lie with al it does not cake in of an eagle. They had the Wäny hat out a cheerful bright a man. Ezek. iv. and 1 In the cente irring,

hierarchy cherubs are represented a mio dr-kul-erd), a. Col- | next in order to seraphs. The bieteni erise.

cal and emblematical figures his w roundear'd caps, and on the veils of the tabernacle are all ined with cherry perd cherubs of curious or skilful wat i clour'd ribbon ,

xxvi.-2. A beautiful child: esibile Fielding

cause artists have generally means im), Th. Cerasin.

cherubs as beautiful winged children, ly-rel), 7. The Eng.

this sense the plural is always chemie Lauro-cerasus, nat.

figure in the game, whence also cheddark 452 re of Asia Minor. It Cherubic (che-rybik), a Pertaining that rel, but mnst not be resembling cherubs; angelic "The dark sweet bay or other

host.' Milton The leaves yield by Cherubic. The cherubial angel' Mali

Cherubical (che-rubik-al) See ated oil, nearly idenum bitter almonds Cherubim (cher'übim), 2. The Belas n the leaves is used plural of cherub. me way as diluted Cherubimic (cher:ü-bîmik)

, a Wok cid. It is poisonous Cherubint (cher’ú-bin)

, a Mente

, e longing to cherubim. pep-ér), 1. A spe- Cherubint (cher'ü-bin), s. A chere

gelic. Her cherubin look' Shak trasiforine), whose -shaped

God in either eye has placed a cerdie Britt A child's play, This form has been used as an equivals are thrown into a of the Hebrew plural Cherubia

Cherup (cherup), 1. (A form el dim cherry pit with Satan.

chirp.] A chirp or chirrup. (Cole! ro . Rum in which "Cherupping birds.' Drayton,

Cherup (cher'op), c.i. To chirporain ), n. A tobacco- by chirping. (Rare]

Cherup (cher'up), at To excite Grunge ung stems of the ind the reddish

He cluetups brisk his ear-erectisg seed op Sometimes these Chervil (cher'vil), n (A 8a1, cerfil 1 40 ed as straight and traction of L.charophyllum, froti Orzesti

phyllon-chairo, to rejoice, and phy 1), 1. The seed leat, from the agreeable odour d that

leaves.] The popular name of plants et de in-er), 72, One

genus Chærophyllum, but espectally dc the stones from temulum. This is the only British gets omestic imple it is a hairy herb of the nat, order Intl lucing a forked feræ, with fongish grooved fruits

, creme g the stone out in fields and waste places throughent le

ain. - Garden chereil is Anthraus Cez A tree pro- folium-Sreet chervil is Myrrhis ordered is mostly given

ees and to that Id cherry. The

d for cabinet - Wine made Chesiblet (ches'i-b]), n. A chasuble Gr. chersonēsos vincial.] ted land, and Chesnut. See CHESTNUT. tract of land Chess (ches), n (From 0. Fr, escles. Le is nearly sur

to a larger kings, from Per, shåh, a king, the prioripal

échecs

, chess, really a plural, meaning i mus; as, the l; the Tauric

mate, It scacco, D.schack, Dan Shak, Icel racian Cher. skdk, G. schach, chess.) An ingenious par en also Cher

ferent pieces on a checkered hoard, dividal

into sixty-four squares. Each party bu omes a cherro 1. Herbert

eight dignified pieces: a king, a queen, te ltic; comp.

bishops, two knights, and two rooks go castles; also eight paws. The pieces d

the parties are of different colours 1 e, or Rock

object of the game is to checkmate the non quartz;

enemy's king. See CFLECKMATE, 11. re or less Bromus secalinus, a grass which grom nerous and

among wheat, bears some resemblance to morphous,

oats, and is sometimes ground up with It occurs

wheat, when it is said to produce narcotia in primi

effects if eaten. Called also Cheat so applied Chess-apple (ches'ap-1), n. A species de me. Thus wild service, Cratagus terminalis

. occur as Chess-board (ches bõrd), . The bound ocks, like used in the game of chess. he Derby. Chessel (ches'sel), 2. (From cheese chert to

mould or vat in which cheese is formed. Dornstone Chessex (ches'seks), 1l. The boards used for

the flooring of a temporary military bridge

playing the game of chess 3 (cher Chessnert (ches nėr), n. A chess-player

. m is also

written I must not seem to sec.

CHICK-WEED

and I

buke

"The Chick-weed (chik'wed), n. [That is, chickenweed; in Scotland it is often called chickenwort or chucken-wort.] The popular name chide

mour of Stellaria media, one of the most common weeds in cultivated and waste ground everywhere in Britain, flowering throughout the

Chide year. It has a procumbent more or less

chide hairy stem, with ovate pointed leaves, and

Chide many small white flowers. It is much used

Chau for feeding cage-birds, which are very fond

Chidi both of its leaves and seeds. -- Mouse-ear chickweed, the popular name of various

wave species of Cerastium. -Winter-green chick

of th weed, the common name of Trientalis euro

of th prea. Chicoraceous (chik-o-ra'shus), a. Cichora

poet ceous (which see)

by h Chicory (chik'o-ri), n. [Fr. chicorée, L cichorium, from Gr. kichorion, chicory.) The popular name of Cichorium intybus, & com- Chid posite plant common in waste places in Eng. or re land, and extending through Europe and Chie: Asia as far as India. It has a fleshy taper- the ing root, a stem from 1 to 3 feet high, with heao

ran! but!

Ar

2. P or a par ord ing cati

TI in the 3. stil chi

AN Thi sup in t

0 DO

Chicory (Cichorium intybus).

in-c

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the See first vita men Chie aut chic milf an per: tior

1 and

spreading branches and lobed and coarsely toothed leaves. The flowers are bright blue, The roots have been extensively employed 38 a substitute for coffee, or to mix with coffee, being roasted and ground for this purpose. Chicory is also cultivated for feeding cattle with its leaves, and the blanched leaves are sometimes used as a salad. Chide (chid), 0.t. pret. chid (chodet]; part. chid, chidden. (A. Sax. cidan, to chide; connections unknown.] 1. To scold; to reprove; to rebuke: with a personal subject

USE and object; as, to chide one for his faults; to chide one for his delay. Almost chide God for making you that countenance you are. Shak. Last chidden for being too slow. Shak. "Chid her and forbid her to speak.' Tennyson.

But Kirk was only chid for it; and it was said that he had a particular order for some military executions, so that he could only be chid for the manner of it.

Bp. Burnet, 2. To find fault with; to take exception to: with a thing as object, especially when regarded as an agent or having activity. Chid his truant youth.' Shak. When we have chid the hasty-footed time for parting us.' Shak. 'Tis not because the ring they ride,

And Lindesay at the ring rides well,
But that my sire the wine will chide,

If 'tis not fill'd by Rosabelle.
3. To fret or murmur against, as waves do ;
to chale. The sea that chides the banks of
England. Shak. (Rare.) --4. To drive or
impel by chiding.

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chi de 3. es si bi co th SE I

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Sir W. Scott.

V

CHICK-PEA

or trees, asafetida, liver Give me buf virtuous actions, and I will not quibble litory of Spain.

and chicane about the matter, Chesterfield. The twigs of Gou Chicaner (shi-kān'er), n. (FT. chicaneur.) ed in the West Indies

One who chicanes or uses shifts, turns, h, and also powdered evasions, or undue artifices, in litigation or

disputes; a caviller; an unfair disputant. aining to Chios, an isle

This is the way to distinguish a logical chicaner from a man of reason.

Locke. o on the Chian strand, ... Odyssey,

Chicanery (shi-kān'ér-i), n. (Fr. chicanerie ! e voicerul sea. Coleridge. Chicane; mean or unfair artifices to perplex nse compact kind of

& cause and obscure the truth; trickery: ed anciently in medi

sophistry. Irritated by perpetual chicanat and a cosmetic.

éry.' Hallam. Manors got by rapine and Cyprus turpentine, is

chicanery.' Lamb.--Syn. Trickery, sophisPistacia Terebinthus.

try, quibbling, stratagem, tergiversation. e of honey, clear, and

Chiccory (chik'o-ri), n. Chicory (which see). olour.

Chich,t Chiche, a. (Fr. chiche, poor, nigSee CHOUSE.) A Turk;

gardly, from L. ciccus, a trifle or thing of no

value.) Niggardly; sparing. Chaucer. -oscuro (ki-ä'ro-skö'. | Chich (chich), n. [Fr. chiche, It. cece, L n. [It., lit. clear-ob

cicer, the chick-pea.) A dwarf pea. Same clear, and obscurus, as Chick-pea (which see). 'Chiches, and the ur.) In the fine arts,

other pulses.' B. Googe. ainting which relates

Chicha (ché'cha), n. (Šp.) 1. Same as Chica, the art of judiciously

2. The seeds of Sterculia Chicha, a South

American tree. s and shadows in a

Chichevache,t n. [Fr., lit. a lean cow.) A

starved cow, supposed to feed on patient on acceptation of the ter 770-oscuro means not only

wives. Lest chichevache you swalwe in hir ed by light and shade, but entraille.' Chaucer. rences in brightness and Chichling, Chichling-vetch (chich'ling. Fairholt.

chich'ling - vech), n. Same as Chickling, (Gr. chiasma, from Chickling-vetch. figure of the Greek Chick (chik), v.i. (Perhaps from A. Sax the central body of cith, a germ or sprout.) To sprout, as seed I by the junction and in the ground; to vegetate. [Provincial.] ic nerves.

Chick (chik), n. (Shortened from chicken.) Same as Chiasm. Same as Chicken. it), n. [Gr. chiastos, Chick-a-berry (chik'a-be-ri), n. A corrup), and lithos, a stone.) tion of Chequer-berry, the fruit of the Gaulite family, generally theria procumbens. (American.) Tandalusite, and also Chickabiddy (chik'a-bid-di), n. A young stals are arranged in chicken: also used as a pet name.. (ProvinThe form of the crys cial.) ism, whose bases are Chickadee (chik'a-dē), n. In America, a e from squares.

But name given to the black-captitmouse (Parus ved at its extremities atricapillus) and to other allied birds, from on, is obviously com their peculiar note. Erent substances, and Chickaree (chik'a-rē), n. The Sciurus hud. at of a black prism, sonius, or American red squirrel, so called through the axis of

from its cry. whitish. The term Chicken (chik'en), n. [A. Sax. cicen, cycen, f a distinct species, a chicken; cog. L.G. kiken, küken: Prov. G. Orisms only. It is a küchen.] 1. A young fowl; particularly a Al,Og . Si 0,).

young domestic fowl. -2. A person of ten(Gr. chiazo, to form der years: generally used of females and as

In surg. a bandage in the following quotation. Stella is no se from the temporal chicken.' Swift.-3. A child: used as a term cross or the Greek of endearment. Chicken hazard, a game

at dice. See HAZARD. - To count one's See CIBOL.) A small chickens before they are hatched, a proverFean. & Fl.

bial expression meaning to anticipate too shi-buk), m. [Turk.] confidently the obtaining of something that Eimes adorned with

one may never receive. e long chibouque's Chicken-breasted (chik'en -brest-ed), a. on.

Pigeon-breasted; having that form of breast m G. geschick, skill.] resulting from a kind of malformation Faculty of producing known as lordosis, or from carious disease idity and ease; great or spinal weakness, in which the vertebral ; grace. --3. Adroit

column is curved forwards, giving rise to ness.

projection of the sternum or breast-bone. he'cha), n. (Sp.) 1.A Chicken-grape (chik'en-grāp), ?.. An Amef in tropical South rican species of the vine, the Vitis cordifolia,

tribes to stain their or heart-leaved vine; also termed Winter. by boiling the leaves

grape. ater, decanting the chicken-hearted (chik'en - härt-ed), a. it to settle and cool, Having no more courage than a chicken ; Ils down which is timid; cowardly.

dried. -2. A fer Chicken-pox (chik'en-poks), n. A mild con. used by the natives tagious eruptive disease, generally appeared from Indian corn. ing in children. a Spanish dance, of Chicket t (chik'et), n. A fastening d cachuca may be

The green shutters and chickets are offensive. lifications.

Ford. Fr., from Per. chau. Chickling (chik'ling), n. (Dim. of chick. ayed on horseback; A small chick or chicken. es the game became

Chickling, Chickling - vetch (chik'ling. and was introduced

chik'ling-vech), n. [Dim. of chich, the chickunder the name of

pea.) A vetch or pea of the genus Lathyrus senses are: first the

(L. sativus), extensively cultivated in the keeping one's own

south of Europe for its seed, which is eaten vres, &c.) The art

in the same way as the chick-pea, but is said or discussion by the

to be of superior quality. as or mean and un

Chick-pea (chik'pē), n. (For chich-pen. trickery: sophistry; See Chon, n.) The popular name of Cicer

arietinum. It grows wild around the shores I propound it fairly to of the Mediterranean and in many parts of

Berkeley. the East, producing a short puffy pod with he campaign,

one or generally two small netted seeds chicane. Prior.

with two swellings on one side. It is much [Fr, chicaner.) To used in olios in Spain, and is an important hifts, cavils, or ar. article in French cookery. When roasted

it is the common parched pulse of the East.

Ichid Lucetta hence.
Find him, my lord of Warwick; chide him hither.

Skak.

Shak.

5. To strike by way of punishment or admonition. "Chidden by the dainty hand." Tennyson. --SYN. To blame, rebuke reprove, scold, censure, reproach. Chide (chid), v. i. To scold; to clamour; to

find fault; to contend in words of anger; sometimes followed by with. And Jacob was wroth and chode with Laban,

Gen. xxxiii. 3o. Wherefore the people did chide with Moses, and said, Give us water that we may drink.

What a beast was 1 to chide at him. Shak.
Fig. to fret; to chafe. 'As doth a rock
against the chiding flood.' Shak.
Chide (chid), n. Murmur; gentle noise.

Ex. xvii. 2.

tube, tub, bull;

oil, pound; ü, Sc. abune;

y, Sc. ley.

ch, chain; ch, Sc. loch; B.go; j, job;

[graphic]

troduced chik Ting-rech), 1 (Dim. of chich, the chick

CHICK-PEA

Cive me but virtuous acties, salvo and chane about the matter

Ver trees, asafetida, liver :icory of Spain.

n. The twigs of Gou- Chicaner (shi-kān'ér) 1 (1 diete ärd in the West Indies th, and also powdered evasions, or undue artifices, in line

One who chicanes or una sita taining to Chios, an isle

disputes; a caviller; an unkár daar

This is the way to distinguish a lugz ica 105 co the Chien grand,

from a man of reason. je vsucelal s2 Colierige.

Chicanery (shi-kån'er-i) (Ft

. chini

Chicane; mean or unfair artifices to people *Duse compact kind of à cause and obscure the truth; trake ed anciently in medí- sophistry. 'Irritated by perpetual din it and a cosmetic.

éry.' Hallam. "Manors get by mapas Cyprus turpentine, is chicanery.' Lamb.–STx

. Trkler Pistacia Terebinthus.

try, quibbling, stratagem, tergirersen e of honey, clear, and Chiccory (chik’o-ri), ni Chicory (vide mlour.

Chich, Chiche,ta. [Fr. chicke, poz, e CHOUSE) A Turk; gardly, from L eiccus, a trife or tag din

value.) Niggardly; sparing. Claw oscuro (ki-dro-sko. Chich (chich), 7 [En chicke, It , 1

[It, lit clear-ob- cicer, the chick-pea) A dwal pe is clear, and obscurius, as Chick-pea (which see)

. 'Chida, et te Ap.) In the fine arts,

other pulses.' B. Googe inting which relates Chicha (chê'cha), na {$p.) 1. Sane a chin le art of judiciously

2 The seeds of Sterculia Chicha, a and shadows in a

American tree.

Chichevache,t n. (Fr., lit a la ca? acceptation of the term

starved cow, supposed to feed ca puta Ty means not only

wives. 'Lest chicherache you spiral lirisht aad shade, but entraille.' Chaucer. aces in brightness and Chichling, Chichling-Fetch (bidin Fairholt.

chich'ling - vech), 11. Same as Chucking Gr. chiasma, from Chickling-vetch. gure of the Greek Chick (chik), u.i. (Perhaps from 1 e central body of cich, a germ or sprout.) To sprout

, 1. F. y the junction and in the ground; to vegetate. (Provided Derves

Chick (chik), 1. (Shortened from citus Same as Chiasm. Same as Chicken

ni (Gr. chiastos, Chick-a-berry (chik'a-be-ri), a. Acam und lithos, a stone.)

tion of Chequer-berry, the fruit of the file family, generally theria procumbens. (American) dalusite, and also Chickabiddy (chik'a-bid-di), s. puan Is are arranged in chicken: also used as a pet name (Praza form of the crys. cial.) , whose bases are Chickadee (chik'a-dė), 9h. In Armenia m squares. But at its extremities atricapillus) and to other allied birdi

, in is obviously com their peculiar note. substances, and Chickaree (chik'a-rē), th The Seture dans a black prism, sonius, or American red squirrel

, so call - ugh the axis of from its cry tish. The term Chicken (chik'en)

, n. [A. Sar cien, som listinct species, is only. It is a

Si 02) chiazo, to form m the temporal or the Greek

name given to the black-captitmouse (Part

3 chicken; cog. L.G, kiken, kuten, Prof. !
küchen.] 1. A young fow); particularita

young domestic fowl. -2 A person d ta surg. a bandage in the following quotation. Stella de De

der years: generally used of females and is chicken.' Swift.-3. A child: used as a tell of endearment. - Chicken hazard, a gente

at dice. See HAZARD). - To caust IBOL.) A small FL.

chickens before they are hatched, 3 porer

bial expression meaning to anticipate to k)

, n. (Turk.) confidently the obtaining of something that adorned with

one may never receive. 5 chibouque's Chicken - breasted (chik'en -brested} -schick, skill) resulting from a kind of malformatica

Pigeon-breasted; having that for et breast of producing known as lordosis

, or from carious disease ad ease; great

or spinal weakness, in which the vertetera --3. Adroit

column is curved forwards, giving rise ta projection of the sternum or breast-bone

. n. (Sp.) 1.A Chicken-grape (chik'en-grāp) . An der -pical South rican species of the vine, the Vitis cordifolia

, o stain their

or heart-leaved vine; also termed Pinter the leaves

grape. anting the chicken-hearted (chik'en - härt-ed), le and cool,

Having no more courage than a chicken which is tímid; cowardly. --2. A fer Chicken-pox (chik'en-poks), n A mild coa the natives

tagious eruptive disease, generally appear adian corn.

ing in children.
dance, of chicket (chik'et), n A fastening.
ca may be

The green shutters and chickets are offensive
Per. chau- chickling (chikling) a (Dim. of chich]
Lorseback; A small chick or chicken.
name of

pea.) A vetch or pea of the genus Lathymes first the (1. sativus), extensively cultivated in the ne's own

the skin great irriscold, censure, reproach. army or fleet, as commander of the army in

tation and even Chide (chid), v. i. To scold; to clamour; to the East, commander of the Mediterranean

troublesome sores find fault; to contend in words of anger: fleet; leader, the head of a party or faction,

are sure to result. sometimes followed by with. or one who conducts some special under

The insect must be And Jacob was wroth and chode with Laban. taking - the leader of the House of Com

extracted Chigoe (Pulex penetrans).

entire, Gen. xxxiii. 36. mons, the leader of the Conservative party,

and with great
Wherefore the people did chide with Moses, and
the leader of the storming party; head, ap-

1, Male, nat. size. 2, Male,
said, Give us water that we may drink. Ex. xvii. 2.
plied to the chief of a tribe or family or pro-

magnified. 3. Female, fuli care, as soon as its What a beast was I to chide at him. Shak

of eggs (nat. size), as taken presence is indi. fession, as the head of the House of Caven from a human toe.

cated by a slight Fig. to fret; to chafe. "As doth a rock dish, the head of the bar.

itching or tingling. against the chiding flood.' Shal.

Chief (chel), adv. Chiefly. Thomson. [Rare.] Written also Chegoe, Chigre, Jigger, &c. Chide (chid), n. Murmur; gentle noise. Chiefage, Chevaget (chētāj, ché'vâj), n. Chigre, Chiggre (chig'gėr), n. See CHIGOE.

south of Europe for its seed, which is eaten The art n by the to be of superior quality. and un-chick-pea (chik/), 2. [For chickpet phistry; See CRICH, s.) The popular name of Cicer

arietinum. It grows wild around the shores fairly to

of the Mediterranean and in many parts

in the same way as the chick-pea, but is said

a kdey

Prior.

the East, producing a short puffy pued spill one or generally two small netted seals with two swellings on one side. It is much used in olios in Spain, and is an important article in French cookery. When roastet it is the common parched pulse of the East

r.) To

or ar

ch, chain; ch, Sc. loch;

6. go;

j, job; , Fr. ton;

ng, sing;

TH, then; th, thin;

w, wig; wh, whig;

zh, azure.-See KEY.

-56

CHILLNESS

By died.

o a knight: comp. some Chiliagon (kil'i-a-gon),n. (Gr. chilia, a thouinfante in Spain and sand, and gonia, a corner.) A plane figure

of a thousand angles and sides. Fenting his desire,

Chiliahedron. See CHILIAEDRON. ary boldnesse went,

Chiliarch (kil'i-ärk), n (Gr. chilioi, a thou

Spenser. a. Furnished with a

sand, and archos, a chief.] The military as I fathered.' Shak.

commander or chief of a thousand men. Chil'dér-mas-dă ), n.

Chiliarchy (kil'i-är-ki), n. A body consist

ing of a thousand men. "The chiliarchies - mass, and day.) An urch of England, held

or regiments of the Lamb.' Dr. H. More. mber, in commemora

Chiliasm (kil'i-azm), r. (Gr.chilioi, a thouof Bethlehem slain by

sand.) Same as Millennium. Innocents'-day.

Chiliast (kil'i.ast), n. (Gr. chilioi, a thourăt), a. Pregnant. Syl

sand.] A Millenarian.

Chiliastic (kil-i-as'tik), a. Relating to the , n. (Child, and suffix

millennium; millenarian. a child, or the time in

Chilifactive (kil-i-fak'tiv). See CHYLIFAC

TIVE. hildren, including the -uberty; or, in a more

Chill (chil), n. [A. Sax. cele, cyle, cold, chill, state or time from in from celan, to cool, from col, cool; cog. D. Thus we say infancy,

kill, chill, killen, to chill; Sw. kyla, to chill: outh, and manhood. same root as in L. gelidus, cold, gelid. See hood shews the man,

COOL.) 1. A shivering with cold; a cold ft; - day.

Milton.

sensation of cold in an animal body; chilli

ness. p. and a. 1. Bearing

A sort of chill about his præcordia

and head.' Derham.-2. That condition of mother then,

the atmosphere or other object which proSouthey.

duces the sensation of cold; coldness such uitful. The childing

as that caused by the approach of ice; re in both uses. ]

chilliness; as, there is a chill in the air. -1. Of or belonging

3. Fig. anything that damps or discourages: Dod. 'Sweet childish

a depressing influence; a check to feelings -2. Like a child, or

of joy; as, a chill came over the assembly. dhood: with the dis The early chill of poverty never left my bones.

Sheil. iling; puerile; ignorildish fear. 'A child

4. In metal, a piece of iron introduced into ic pains.' Cowper.

a mould so as to rapidly cool the surface of

molten iron which comes in contact there), adv. In a childish

with. in a trifling way; in Chill (chil), a. 1. Cold; tending to cause ner.

shivering; as, the chill vapours of night. d'ish-mind'ed), a. Of Noisome winds and blasting vapours chill.' artless; undesigning;

Milton.-2. Experiencing cold, shivering

with cold. The many will be too chill and (child'ish-minded

tender.' Shak. ing childish-minded;

My chill veins freeze with despair. Rowe. acon. r-nes), n. The state

3. Fig. (a) depressing; dispiriting; discourdish; puerility; sim

aging

Chill penury repress'd their noble rage, reakness of intellect:

And froze the genial current of the soul. Gray. paraging sense.

(6) Distant; formal; not warm, animated, hou, boy: will move him more

or affectionate; as, a chill reception. (c) InShak.

sensible in death.
He is chill to praise or blame,

.

Tonnysar. -ing),n. Infanticide. at),a. Learned when

Chill (chil), v. t. 1. To affect with chill; to stition's child-learnt

make chilly; to strike or blast with severe

cold. * Chill'd my veins.' Dryden. When Pestitute of chil.

winter chilled the day.' Goldsmith.-2. Fig. m. xv. 33.

to check in enthusiasm or warmth; to diss-nes), n. State of

courage; to dispirit; to depress. "Chilling

his caresses by the coldness of his manResembling a child

ners.' Tennyson. - 3. In metal. to reduce co children; becom

suddenly the temperature of a piece of castbmissive; dutiful:

iron so as to cause a change of crystallizaing sense. 'Child

tion at or near the surface with the view of

hardening it. ce a child; acquired Chilled (child), p. and a. 1. Cooled; cold;

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CHILLY

(6) An unpleasant degree of coldness; as, the Chimb,

Chimbe chillness of the air.

bell. Chilly (chil'i), a. (Chill, and term. -y.) 1. Ex.

The sely periencing the sensation of chilliness ; chilled.

Chime

cymbal I'm as chilly as a bottle of port in a hard frost. Colman the younger.

bale foi 2. Disagreeably cold; chilling; cold, so as to

whenci produce the sensation of shivering

to toll. A chilly sweat bedews

or mus My shuddering limbs,

7. Philips

of sou Chilly (chil'li), adv. [Chill, and term. -ly.) i. 1,86 In a chill or chilly manner; coldly, with

chine. coldness; as, to receive a person chilly.

Wet Chilly, n. See CHILLI

2. A se Chilognath (ki'log-nath), n. A member of

to 3 m the order Chilognatha. Chilognatha (ki-log'na-tha), n. pl. Same

not by as Cheilognatha.

from 1 Chiloma (ki-lõ'ma), n. (Gr. cheilõma, a lip.] rising în zool. the upper lip or muzzle of a quad

lower ruped, when tumid and continued uninter

menta ruptedly from the nostril, as in the camel.

subdo Chilopod (ki'lo-pod), n. Same as Cheilopod. in gei Chilopoda (ki-lop'o-da), n. pl. Same as

lation Cheilopoda.

arran Chiltern Hundreds (chil'tern hundredz), or mi 11. A hilly district of Buckinghamshire

with which has belonged to the crown from time

chime immemorial. To this district a nominal

a stai office is attached, and the person holding it

the R is called the Steward of the Chiltern Hun- Chimi dreds. As a menuber of the House of Com ance, mons, not in any respect disqualified, can

moni not resign his seat directly, any member

Chill+ (chil), v. i. To shiver. 'Childly wont and

shivering. 2. Childish humour Priam's aged joints with chilled' fear did shake.

Chapman. gaiety of a child.

2. Dejected; discouraged. — 3. Hardened by

chilling; as, chilled iron; chilled shot.-4. In 1. of child (which painting, applied to the varnish of a picue, progeny.

ture when the cloudiness or dimness called ., n. A mineral sub

blooming appears on the surface. vall and in Devon Chiller (chil'ér), n. One who or that which e of alumina and chills.

Chill-hardening (chil'hard-n-ing), n. A les), a. Childless.

mode of tempering steel-cuttinginstruments

by exposing the red-hot metal to a blast of n. 1. A wife with cold air. E. H. Knight. eas; an over-young chilli, Chilly (chil'i), n. (Sp. chile.) The nan who has borne

pod or fruit of the Capsicum annuum or

Guinea pepper. See CAPSICUM. (Child, and wite, a Chilliness (chil'i-nes), n. The state or penalty on a bond. quality of being chilly: (a) sensation of shihild.

vering; painful or disagreeable feeling of LI.

coldness. A chilliness or shivering affects Lilias, from chilioi, the body.' Arbuthnot. (b) A degree of cold ad; a collection or

that causes shivering: chillness; as, the nd individuals or chilliness of the wind. thms of so many chilling (chil'ing). P. and a. 1. Cooling: bers.' Branded causing to shiver; cold; as, a chilling wind. housand years. 2 F'ig. tending to repress enthusiasm or of years; as, decads, warmth; cold; distant; discouraging: de

Holder. pressing; as, a chilling manner. on (kil'i-a-ė"dron, Chillingly chil'ing-li). adv. In a chilling Bilioi, a thousand, manner; coldly.

In geom. a figure Chillness (chii'nes), *. The state or quae.]

lity of being chill: (a) the feeling of coolness dron, or a body of a

or coldness; a shivering. figure may be very If you come out of the sun suddenly into the shade. nber be very distinct. there followeth a chillness or shivering in all the

Locke. body.

chim who wishes to resign may accomplish his

After object by accepting the stewardship of the

2. To Chiltern Hundreds, which, being held to be

with a place of honour and profit under the

chim crown, vacates the seat. This nominal place is in the gift of the chancellor of the Every exchequer, and the recipients usually resign 3. To immediately after appointment.

Hei Chimæra, Chimera (ki-mēra), n. L. chi but of mæra, from Gr.chimaira, a chimsera.] 1. In

4.1 T class myth. a fire-breathing monster, the

Chim harm with With And 2. To rhytt Let

Chim base. appe the 1. TH

the the

fort Chir

Chimæra-Lycian terra cotta, Brit. Museum. fore parts of whose body were those of a lion, the middle of a goat, and the hinder by t of a dragon; supposed to represent a volcanic mountain in Lycia, whose top was the resort of lions, the middle that of goats, and left the foot that of serpents. 'Gorgons, and hydras, and chimeras dire' Milton. HenceIn ornamental art, a fantastic assemblage

chit
of animal forms so combined as to produce chip
one complete but unnatural design. Such
chimæras are frequently seen on antique
engraved gems and bas-reliefs.--3. A vain or
idle fancy; a creature of the imagination,
composed of contradictions or absurdities
that can havenoexistence except in thought.
Chimeras, crotehets, Christmas solecisms.'
Tennyson.-4. In ich a genus of cartilagin-
ous fishes. The only known species is the
Chimæra monstrosa, which inhabits the
northern sens, and is sometimes called king CE

Chis
Chi-

lav th sa 01

id

Chimera monstrosa.

of the herrings, and, from its two pairs of large teeth, rabbit-fish. It seldom exceeds 3 feet, and produces eggs inclosed in leathery cases Chimæridae, Chimerida (ki-meri-dē),n.pl.

A family of cartilaginous fishes, distinguished from the other families of the cartilaginous order by possessing a single gillopening, by the head being furnished with appendages, and the tail terminating in a point. It contains the genera Chimera and Callorhynchus. Chimæroid (ki-me'roid), a. Relating to or

like a chinnera or the Chimieridae

tübe, tub, bull;

oil, pound;

ü, Sc. abune;

y, Sc. fey.

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